How Many Hours a Day Are You Actually Working?

Take into consideration toilet breaks and smoke breaks etc,how many hours a day are you actually working?

Comments

  • +17 votes

    I'd say in a given week I probably only do about fifteen minutes of real, actual, work.

  • +15 votes

    Why do you want to know? Who are you working for? Will all comments be noted again haha.

    My ship is tight but I have enough time to go to get a car wash financially if that's what you really want to know.

  • +5 votes

    How many are you actually working?

  •  

    I'm a science teacher. First 5 years I'd put in 9-10 hours of full, solid work a day probably… if you include the time after school and weekends into a standard 5 day work week. Now, it's perhaps 8-9 hours that I'm more experienced.

    This is taking into account lunch breaks, being unproductive, not including the commute.

  • +1 vote

    All kind of depends, I've had weeks where I'm putting in 8 hours or more a day, with back to back meetings without lunch. Recently things have happily died down, and I've probably been putting closer to 5 effective hours, but I spend most of my other time doing online courses which could be used at work so at least I don't feel bad about relaxing. Though to be fair I also spend a lot of time refreshing ozbargain lol.

  • +2 votes

    I work 25 hours a day.

    Yes, please take note of that, as you did in previous forum posts.

  •  

    Oh it depends, but I think about 557 hours a day when busy?

  •  

    Solid work time? At least 8. When I was less efficient, 14.

  •  

    Contracted and paid for 40 hours a week. Working hours are usually 60, sometimes 70 although it's very flexible in terms of no rigid starting time or leaving time. Can even do it working from home or weekends. Actual working hours is near enough that, it excludes lunches already but includes occasional chit chats around office. No toilet/smoke breaks. If I don't like it, there's many people who would happily take my role tomorrow.

  •  

    probably 10

  • +1 vote

    In my mind, I usually have allocated Mon-Fri for work and never really get to switch off except when sleeping. There are days where it's 12-15 hours/day and there are days where it's 2 hours/day or nothing at all. My office is pretty flexible so we manage our time ourselves.

    I try my best to not touch or think about work on the weekend. That's MY time.

    • +1 vote

      Completely agree with this, exactly the same case during the week and weekend try to be completely devoid of anything work related. Monday morning showers, however, are never pleasant as it all comes rushing back and probably the time I spend most doing daily planning and actions lists.

      • +2 votes

        Monday morning showers, however, are never pleasant as it all comes rushing back

        This is the exact same feeling I get! I'm not alone!
        I also find myself taking a few deep breaths as I walk through the office doors on the Monday morning.

  •  

    My timesheet is anywhere from 38 to 50 a week. I just spend most time here when I can.

  •  

    I clock on for 36.5 hours a week, and probably only work for about .4 of it

  • +1 vote

    OP, I'll tell you mine if you tell me yours.

  • +3 votes

    Not as long or as hard as Women or gender neutral individuals work.

    And they get paid less for it.

    This is totally true guys people. Don't believe any facts that tell you different.

    Edit: Removed gendered language. I apologize to anyone who was offended. I will delete all my social media immediately.

  •  

    about 1-2 hours a day (on demand). 3-4 hours is study and reading. 7 hour 25 minute work days. the rest is ozbargain and aliexpress.

    I'll work 2-3 hours extra two days a week, with no extra pay or incentive.

    I love my job and work environment

  •  

    There may be some rare exceptions eg small business owner or startup (or perhaps times where it could be possible for short periods of time due to extraordinary circumstances), but any "white collar" office type worker that claims they work 100% of the time they are at work is kidding themselves.

    Even if you loved your job…someone like Steve Irwin or something. I doubt it.

    If one did, you'd likely be physically and/or mentally burnt out very quickly.

    •  

      Is a trauma surgeon considered white collar?

    •  

      any "white collar" office type worker that claims they work 100% of the time they are at work is kidding themselves.

      I agree, but also disagree. "Working" doesn't necessarily mean physically doing something. There's roles that are more idea and thought-based and not just sitting in front of the computer doing stuff.

      Cigarette time might seem like downtime, but im usually standing there trying to work out how where things are up to before the next meeting.

      So for me, "working" is when I'm not doing my own stuff.

  • +5 votes

    Some people I work with actually create more work than they do. So for them it would be more like negative 2 hours of work a day.

  • +1 vote

    White collar workers should consider reading the book Deep Work by Cal Newport.

    They also did a study of people that claim they work 60+ hours a week and what they found was people only do 40 hours of work but they are there for 60+ hours so they are wasting 20+ hours by just being there.

    IDK about you but I could think of better things to do with my time…

    •  

      so they are wasting 20+ hours by just being there.

      F-that! As soon as I'm not productive anymore, I'm out of there! I make sure my staff feel comfortable doing that too! No point sitting around watching the clock and pretending to work.

      I have never been able understand why some management insist on their staff clock-in and clock-out to the minute so that they "work" exactly 8 hours or whatever!

    •  

      then there's how much of the 40 hours was actually necessary. I've worked for quite a few companies and most of them have a lot of people doing stuff just because that's what they've always done.

    •  

      I wouldn't call it wasting, stuff like simple emails for example would get returned much quicker if you worked that 60+ hours.

    • +1 vote

      Haven't read the book, but the notion that every hour you're not actively working on a specific task is "wasted" is just flat out wrong. People aren't machines and need downtime in order to approach tasks from different angles. Especially white collar work which isn't a methodical, "Do A, then do B" kind of rote/memorized work like say, assembly line workers.

  •  

    I know one guy that the only hard work he does is when his working out ways to get out of work

  •  

    Zero hours a day.

  •  

    In a previous role on board a cruise ship I would do less than 10 hours a week. I would put my uniform on for about 2-4 hours a day. Walk around, look busy make sure I got seen doing stuff by people.

    I was hired to run a bunch of technical TV related systems. I was quite good at this job especially foreseeing and solving problems.

    Worst thing is I was on a ship and couldn't go home.

  •  

    There are a number of companies in the overly progressive areas in the States that have completely different working arrangements. Some will go with slight variations, such as 'do your 40 hours per week however you like' such that you can start/finish whenever you like, and work however many hours you like on a given day, so long as you reach 40 hours across the week. Other companies go a step further and make it project/milestone based, such that you have until [insert date here] to have XYZ done; it doesn't matter whether you work 8 hours per day for a month, or nothing for two weeks and then get it over the line for 15 hours per week in the final two weeks. Something like that might appear similar to contract work, but these employees are salaried employees with all the same perks of your 9-5 jobs.

    With how connected everything is, you will see a lot of workplaces pushing in this direction, IMO. Some people might like getting up at 4am, exercising, then starting work at 6 to skip traffic and being home by mid-afternoon. Some people might enjoy sleeping in and finishing late; maybe to grab dinner on the way home. Some people might prefer to stick to the 9-5 framework. If employees can work when and how is most appropriate for their own effectiveness, then it helps everyone and reduces the amount of lost productivity (sorry, Ozbargain).

  •  

    Who has time for work when there are arguments to be had on OzBargain?

  •  

    Not getting sucked into telling you this… boss could be listening

  •  

    I would like to quote Pooh Bear here, "People say nothing is impossible, but I do nothing everyday.."

  •  

    I work 12 days on 2 off, however 2 of the 12 are only 1-4hrs depending.

    Some days I'm at work for 11.5hrs, with a 30min break. Apparently this is legal because I have 3 sepperate contracts for the same employer.