Doctor's of Ozb: Help Me Interpret My Blood Type

Hi OzB doctor's

Can you help me interpret my blood type in layman's terms:

Pic here: https://imgur.com/jmSkXXb

Comments

  • -2

    I wish jv can chime in, just to be positively sure

  • +14

    B Positive.

    The left hand side is the type of test they ran, and the right hand side is your result.

    ABO and Rh(D) blood group -> ABO is testing if you are A, AB, B or O, Rh(D) is testing if you have Rhesus D antigen, which is the positive or negative.

    disclaimer: not a doctor (also avid Brooklyn 99 watcher)

    • +16

      Only B+?? This brings shame to our family. No dinner for you tonight until you get A+.

    • It's good to be positive.

      • +1

        Not necessarily, at the moment.

    • New Brooklyn out yet?

  • B+

  • +1

    You have the blood type that atracts falling trees from your neighbors backyard.

  • +1

    They're telling you to be more positive in life

    Source : am a love doctor

    • Can you cure me?

      • +1

        Doctors makes things go away.

        • apples do too

  • +1

    Next time ask the doctor or hospital or nurse who gives you the results as they will be the best to explain them.

  • +2

    Bikies +

  • +16

    OK, so your blood type is 'B+'.

    The 'B' relates to the 'ABO' system of blood typing, and the '+' relates to the 'Rhesus' system of blood typing—both of which have important clinical implications in certain contexts such as blood transfusions and childbirth. The two systems both refer to the presence or absence of different tiny genetically determined structures that are present on the surfaces of all of your red blood cells (RBCs). I'll explain each system in turn.

    ABO system

    You get one 'ABO' gene from your mum, and one from your dad. In somewhat simplified terms, if you get at least one 'A' gene your ABO blood type will include the letter 'A'. Similarly, if you get at least one 'B' gene your ABO blood type will include the letter 'B'. If you happen to get neither A nor B, then your ABO blood type will 'O'. Note that there is no tiny little 'O' protein structure on the surfaces of RBCs … 'O' refers to a lack of A or B structures.

    So, given that you are ABO-type 'B', you got at least one 'B gene' from one of your parents, and you definitely did not get an 'A' gene from either of your parents. On a genetic level, you could be 'BB', or 'BO' … (both yield ABO blood type 'B') but genetically you are definitely not 'AA', 'AB', 'AO', or 'OO'. This typing system is mainly known for its importance with regard to the capacity to donate and receive blood transfusions. If you want to know more about that it's relatively simple reading, but the basic gist is that if you don't have 'A' included in your blood type you cannot receive blood from someone who does (because your immune system will reject that blood), and the same holds for 'B'. So, type 'O' people are known as 'universal donors' and are highly sought after donors, because they can donate to anyone … whereas conversely, type 'AB' people can donate to the fewest people (only other 'AB' people). Type 'A' people can donate to type 'A' people; but they can also donate to type 'AB' people … because their blood contains nothing that will be identified as 'foreign/an invader' by type AB people's immune systems. Similarly, type 'B' people can donate to type B people, and type AB people for the same aforementioned reason. Thus, AB peeps are know as 'universal recipients', because they can receive blood of any ABO blood type.

    Rhesus/Rh system

    The Rhesus blood typing system is simpler, in that it just refers to the presence ('+') or absence ('-') of one tiny little structure on the surface of RBCs, the so-called RhD antigen. You are '+', so at least one (and possibly both) of your parents passed on a '+' Rh gene to you. Clinically, this blood typing system is very important with respect to a specific condition called 'haemolytic disease of the newborn'. I've said quite a bit above already, and I am often accused of writing long-winded 'essays' on OzB, so I'll leave it here I guess. I'm happy to respond to any specific question if you have one though.

    • +3

      often accused of writing long-winded 'essays'

      That's a bit unfair

    • Knarley dude

    • Thank you for that - never know the reason for blood type compatibility.

    • So, type 'O' people are known as 'universal donors' and are highly sought after donors, because they can donate to anyone …

      But don't they have to be Rh neg?

      • -1

        Technically, O- is the universal donor as they can donate to anyone. However you often hear people say O+ is the universal donor.

        O- is often in short supply. So O+ is often used in an emergency (life or death) situation. That is fine for a RH+ Person. However a RH - person can only receive +ve blood once. They will have adverse reactions after that

        When I had 2 Unit's of blood after a surgery where they nicked something, I made sure to check that the blood was O-

        • -1

          Sorry but your answer is incorrect!
          For emergency transfusions, blood group type O negative blood is the variety of blood that has the lowest risk of causing serious reactions for most people who receive it. Because of this, it's sometimes called the universal blood donor type.
          O negative donors are often called 'universal donors' because anyone can receive the red blood cells from their donations. Although about 8% of the population has O negative blood, it accounts for around 13% of hospital requests for red blood cells.

          O positive red blood cells are not universally compatible to all types, but they are compatible to any red blood cells that are positive (A+, B+, O+, AB+). … Those with O positive blood can only receive transfusions from O positive or O negative blood types.

      • suzley Correct-O negative donors are often called 'universal donors' because anyone can receive the red blood cells from their donations. Although about 8% of the population has O negative blood, it accounts for around 13% of hospital requests for red blood cells.