• out of stock

Ollee 11.6 Inch Celeron N3350/4GB RAM/64GB eMMC Laptop $198 + Delivery ($0 in-Store/ C&C) @ Harvey Norman

162

This laptop is considered a bargain by many users, and is back in stock with $100 off. Cheap, but a hi-res 1920x1080 Full HD screen, and a bay underneath that can hold an M.2 SSD, which are both unusual at this price. Add a 512GB SSD for say $80, and you have a surprisingly cheap, useful, lightweight, if not too fast, snowbook with more storage than laptops costing twice as much.

More details on the laptop and adding an SSD at

https://lloydwood.dreamwidth.org/16609.html

I am not associated with Harvey Norman, just a buyer and user.

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closed Comments

  • +13

    Gerry probably uses one of these with an Apple sticker on it

  • +2

    Did Gerry Harvey buy these in bulk in 1985?

    • +5

      Since its processor and graphics were released in 2016, I'm going to say no.

  • +1

    How would this be as a dedicated photo viewer/screensaver?

    • +2

      it's a laptop for general purpose computing. You can dedicate a tablet to viewing photos, and pass the tablet around a group more easily. Different use cases.

  • +1

    Would have been good with 8gb ram, not sure if this ddr3 can be replaced

    • +2

      Microsoft's pricing rules for Windows are likely involved in the memory choice. Memory is non-upgradable. Putting in 8GB would add cost, but could make Windows licensing much more expensive.

      https://liliputing.com/2016/09/dont-see-cheap-windows-device...

      Still, virtual memory on an SSD is not bad.

      • Keep in mind it's not a real SSD in this thing either and every bit of virtual memory eats away at your 64gb emmc drive.

        • you did read the top of this page describing the M.2 SSD bay and the linked HOWTO on how to switch to running Windows, C:\ and virtual memory off a real SSD in the M.2 bay?

          https://lloydwood.dreamwidth.org/16609.html

          Of course you did.

          My 512GB SATA M.2 2280 SSD is running Windows and virtual memory quite well. Not bad for $80.

  • +1

    I can't say the brand Ollee out loud without chuckling

    • +1

      YOLOeeeee

  • +4

    Burner laptop?

  • +3

    I don't think this would be a good buy for the vast majority of use cases.

    A product of similar specs made by the same company sold for $198 3 years ago https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/425100

    It's almost certain to be slow.

    From the link in your description they mention 2 hours of battery usage.

    https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/675251 lots of conversation in previous deal that seems to have started late last month at same price.

  • Getting netbook vibes.
    Nostalgia purchase incoming!

  • Good little battery backed home server to run pihole and other light duty serving, maybe a little USB NAS and VPN?

    • Why stop at home server use? This is probably suitable for SMB or even enterprise level.

  • +5

    Good little laptop to run windows based car tuning and diagnosis software via bluetooth and usb canbus cable to OBD2 port. Cheap enough as a knockaround

  • +8

    Friends don't let friends buy Celerons.

    It ain't called Cel-er-on for nothing…

    • +1

      That processor actually benchmarks errrm OK I guess… nothing I would want to use Windows 10 on for a sustained amount of time.

      I would prefer a low end AMD chipset as opposed to Celeron.

      • I've used a low-end AMD A4 machine, which is sub-Atom. The Celeron is a massive upgrade.

    • -1

      Celeron means swift, accelerated, turned on. That's marketing.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Celeron#Background

  • +3

    Who remembers the OP getting smashed the last time a deal for this model was posted here:

    https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/675251

    • Obviously very outdated hardware, but is there any other recommendations for around $200?

      • +2

        Refurb, but that market has gone up since Covid demand spiked

  • Can this covert into a Chromebook?

    • +2

      You'd probably be able to install Cloudready on it and get decent usage out of it, just no Android apps at this stage.

    • Maybe, but if it could, you wouldn't know (check your spelling).

  • +6

    I'll say it: isn't this basically eWaste?? Can't run more than a few tabs without running out of storage. I suppose an upgradable M.2 slot is a good thing, but 4GB of RAM surely makes this very short-sighted purchase? If $200 is your budget, then it would be far better to spend similar money on something used I would say?

    This laptop is considered a bargain by many users

    Yes…. and considered a terrible buy by many others too… : https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/675251

    • +7

      I'll say it: isn't this basically eWaste??

      Depends on your use case. The world is not full of power users. I know people that are still using an old netbook as their daily driver with WinXP, because it does the job they need of it. I still have my Dell laptop from 2008, which happily runs Win10. It runs just fine for what I want, and the 17" screen is a bonus. No need to buy something modern until it no longer does what I need of it. According to the few benchmarks I could find, this Celeron processor can easily keep up with it.

      For someone on a tight budget that only wants to do e-mail and facebook, and view the occasional movie, this will do the job adequately.

      Having said that … I can only imagine what the plonkers at HN boast this is capable of doing.

      • +3

        If you just want to watch movies on it, I'm sure that would be fine. Good luck.

        For anything else… well, XP on 2GB is quite pleasant. So is Win 7 on 4GB. As is Win 10 on 4GB…. all of them, until you open up google chrome, or start to run onedrive for cloud files (syncing is highly CPU and disk intensive)… even basic modern things will cripple this machine. I don't know how you are saying that "this Celeron processor can easily keep up with it" … it gets the same single threaded score of 811 as a Core 2 Duo processor from 2008.

        • it gets the same single threaded score of 811 as a Core 2 Duo processor from 2008.

          Precisely. You seem to have glossed over the rather simple fact that my old laptop does all I need of it.

          You sound like your struggling to comprehend that not everyone needs a machine as powerful as you. I get it. I was absolutely appalled when I learned my brother had signed up to one of those 200mb ADSL plans all those years ago. Thing is, he never went over the limit, so turns out I was the one who didn't understand.

          Working in retail 20 odd years ago, I could never understand why someone would by a certain size HDD, when one double the size was only $50 more. I was schooled by a customer who told me he had saved for months to be able to buy the drive he had chosen, and that $50 would mean another 2 months of saving.

          Like you, I would be reticent to promote this machine to anyone without first doing a deep-dive into their needs. Sadly, this is something HN won't be doing. EVER.

          • +4

            @photonbuddy: As an anecdote, I gave my Dad an old Core 2 Duo laptop from a throw out pile at work. I threw an SSD in that I had lying around and installed Windows 10. The machine has been running fine for the past 2 years. For simple web browsing, email checking, it's fine.

            Like you, I would be reticent to promote this machine to anyone without first doing a deep-dive into their needs.

            +1

            • +1

              @ihfree:

              I threw an SSD

              I did this with my old Dell. I ain't gunna toss out a 17" laptop because some clown on the Internet thinks it's past it's use-by date.

              Funny how pinchies complains that this laptop is just ewaste, yet would have us create more ewaste because they don't understand not everyone needs the flash speeds of new laptops.

              My old Dell runs Office just fine. I can browse multiple tabs just fine. I can listen to music just fine. Here's the kicker - I can do three at the same time, just fine.

              Sure, my 3600x desktop craps all over it, but that doesn't mean I should toss it out and spend good money on something with a smaller screen that won't do anything more than I ask of my old Dell.

              • +2

                @photonbuddy: My comment started out, isn’t this basically e-waste: you guys have shown how this machine is equivalent in performance to products that many others are currently throwing away.

                You guys have provided several anecdotes about how a secondhand machine would be quite sufficient. I am 100% in favour of procuring and using a used machine for a purpose like this, rather than manufacturing a new device that is expected to have a short product lifespan. You could get a used machine with far better overall performance for far less money than this.

                The full HD screen is about the only thing that’s nice about this laptop, and I would be curious if that is even something of a decent panel.

                For the record, one of the machines I use is an old lenovo T430. With upgraded 8GB of RAM, Windows 10, and a 512 GB SSD.

                • +1

                  @pinchies: Don't disagree. However, this is a much more compact device and fanless. As shown here, there are uses for these machines.

                  Ex-corporate machines could definitely be a better option depending on the machines intended use. I would even argue they'd be better for most users.

                • -3

                  @pinchies:

                  that many others are currently throwing away.

                  And why are they throwing them away? Mostly because they are either broken, or they think they need something new. The vast majority of people could easily get by with a 10yo PC, and be more than happy.

                  Truth is, your a low-end snob. You think there is no possible way this machine could be of any use to anyone, and that's simply not true.

                  You could get a used machine with far better overall performance for far less money than this.

                  Possibly, but then you have a machine that has had a life of unknown hardship. I know several people who refuse to buy anything second hand. Why should they have to pony-up extra cash just because you think this laptop is ewaste?

                  • @photonbuddy:

                    Truth is, your a low-end snob

                    I disagree with your grand mis-characterisation. The right machine for the job. As I mentioned, I use an old T430 for a range of tasks, and it performs quite adequately. But I think it is important that people are aware to expect 2008-era performance when buying this machine.

                    You think there is no possible way this machine could be of any use to anyone

                    You may see my previous comment:

                    If you just want to watch movies on it, I'm sure that would be fine.

                    Let me reiterate:

                    1. There are many used machines out there that would be able to fill the jobs that this machine does. Buying one of those would be better from am sustainability perspective, and would help save a machine from landfill. Yes, some people may refuse to buy used. For sure, fine, that is their call. However:

                    2. The fixed and limited RAM will severely limit the range of present and future uses for this machine, increasing the likelihood that it will have a short lifespan.

                    • -2

                      @pinchies:

                      I think it is important that people are aware to expect 2008-era performance when buying this machine.

                      That's totally different to your initial comment of "This is ewaste!!!!!"

                      Face it, you made an idiotic post, have been called out for it, and now your backtracking to save face.

                      Epic fail!

    • think of purchasing as a signal to the market.

      I like small laptops; they're not that common. I like this form factor. Buying encourages more development in this size.

      I understand Microsoft gives Windows licenses for free for low-end laptops, just to prevent Linux getting a foothold, which is the only reason I can think of for a laptop having 4GB at this point. This Celeron supports 8GB RAM.

  • +6

    Upvoted, mainly to mess with Wiffy. My neg on the last deal was in a large part due to eMMC storage.

    In my opinion, installation of a M2 is important if you buy this device. This takes a M2 SATA ssd. This is different from the standard M2 SSDs posted - this does not support NVME ssds. It would be worth confirming the key of the m2 this device uses.

    This is a decent laptop IF you know what you're buying. It's perfect for travel and fanless. If you don't know what you're buying, it's worth reading about what such a machine is capable of before making a decision.

    If you read the last thread, for the love of god, please ignore Wiffy's advice regarding security updates.

  • +1

    This probably could be a decent alternative to a Raspberry Pi, if you were looking to run home assistant. Eg built in UPS, screen.

    • Mmm, was just wondering that. Want to get into Home Assistant. Load with Linux and run up HA?

      • Personally I use a Hyper V image on Win 10, which of course is not the ideal method on a PC like this one.
        I reckon the best bet would be the installation method at this link, it is a linux based image ready to go.
        https://www.home-assistant.io/installation/generic-x86-64

        Big fan of Home Assistant. I spend 10x the amount of time messing with it, than the time it gives me back through automating things.

        • Hahaha that's what I'm worried about. Really only have a few lights and power plugs all running under Tuya. Probably HA is overkill for my requirements, but why? Because I can 😂

          • @Limbot: Being able to turn lights and power points on from the HA interface is one thing, but the real value is in the automations.

            Eg simple stuff like setting rules so that the lights come on when you are 100m away from home AND it's dark outside. Or having the A/C & TV turn off if you leave the house and forget to manually turn them off. Having the pool filter pump come on based on a sunrise/sunset offset (so it automatically adjusts for winter/summer daylight running). Smart alerts that send pictures from security cameras, but only when you are not home.

            Nothing particularly amazing or groundbreaking automations, just simple stuff.

  • +1

    I think this would run a lot better with Linux Mint or some similar lightweight Linux distro for some computing on a pinch.

    • I'm running Ubuntu under the Microsoft subsystem for linux, Xming for X display. Ideal for applications and not having to deal with drivers.

      • I wouldn't be running that stack on this thing.

    • Would certainly run better than Win10

    • Zorin OS Lite or Cloudready (Chrome OS) would do pretty well.

  • Slower than a 2009 Core i3. Nice.

  • Thanks OP, I've been looking for something like that, to use as lightweight Ubuntu or Debian laptop. This one is fan-less, FullHD, has 5Ghz WiFi and an SSD slot (and I just happen to have a spare SSD drive). Not concerned about the CPU power for my use cases.

  • +1

    While this model still out of stock, the larger clunkier Ollee model (only 1366x768 display, one USB 3.0 port, other 2.0) has now been reduced to $199 at Harvey Norman.

    That one is still not a bargain by comparison imo. pay a dollar more, get a lot less - in a bigger case!

    • Got the small one and it runs Ubuntu perfectly. My only complaint at this price point, it could have a type C PD charging (and so they could also have saved a few bucks by not including a proprietary charger at all).

      • I've spent a few years dealing with Hewlett Packard laptops where USB-C charging simply doesn't work reliably. I finally gave up on waking up an Elitebook plugged in and charging overnight whose previously full battery was dead, and now I only use a coax DC charger (since that port is also there).

        continuous BIOS upgrades, driver fixes… the complexity of USB-C is somewhat at odds with 'cheap reliable commodity laptop'. USB-C charging is a minefield.

        Or maybe HP is just really bad at it? Still, coax DC is one less thing to worry about - when it stays plugged in.

    • Today that larger clunkier older model is back to its original price of $348 —- and it's definitely NOT a bargain. If that one ever got reduced to S99 I might be interested…

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