What Are My Options for Adding a Bathtub to a Rental?

About to rent a studio/1bedroom with the missus. A bathtub is absolutely a must, but recently we've seen very compelling units, without a bathtub.

So off to Google I went, to look for carry-in and rental-friendly options. So far I've found the inflatable ones at ~$60, and cheapest freestanding ones at ~$550+freight(unknown, probably $100-$200 or more).

Are there any reasonable in-between options?

Comments

  • +15 votes

    This sounds like a recipe for disaster. You're going to flood your apartment and maybe your neighbours too.

  • +13 votes

    Find an apartment to rent with a bathtub, or adjust your expectations on having one.

    I can sorta understand why you would need one for a small child/baby but we got by in an apartment with a baby using a pastic clamshell container in the shower.

    •  

      We actually want the bathtub for ourselves… =/

      • +2 votes

        Nothing like a hot bath on a hot Brisbane summer's day

      •  

        I would be lucky to use my bathtub 3 times a year in Brisbane. Just too hot for most of the year to be able to use it.

      • +2 votes

        Can't you just do it on the bed, kitchen table, balcony or Uniqlo change rooms like everyone else?

        •  

          Don't do anything on a balcony - they're always collapsing according to the media.

  •  

    Have a better look for apartments, there should be plenty with combined shower/bath

    If you don't mind spending a lot you can always ask the REA to ask the owner if he would be willing to put in a bath if you paid for it

  • +5 votes

    If it's for a baby bath, use the laundry tub or a plastic baby bath instead. Heaps easier on your back. If it's for toddlers/kids, they can shower fine, just get a non slip floor mat for the shower. Sure it's not as much fun as a bath, but it gets them clean.

    If you must soak yourself/partner rent a place with a bath, popping a few hundred kgs of bath and water where it isn't designed to be could go horribly wrong. The floor might not be made to take it.

    •  

      That's a good point with the floor load capacity… hmm…

      •  

        floor load capacity

        You'll be fine.

        •  

          So you're a builder or structural engineer? Have seen instance on TV where they wouldnt let a bath be installed until the floor was reinforced (timber joists). Maybe it depends on the construction of the unit. Slab on ground won't be a problem.

        • +1 vote

          @Euphemistic:
          Keep it under 1.5kpa and it'll be fine.

        •  

          @Euphemistic:

          Have seen instance on TV

          Don't believe everything you watch on the idiot box.

        •  

          @whooah1979:

          Don't believe everything you watch on the idiot box.

          nor what you see on the internet without some form of acknowledgement that the person stating actually has the knowledge to make the statement - the reason I asked what you do.

          For the layman, what does 1.5kpa represent?

        • +1 vote

          @Euphemistic:
          150kg/m2.

        •  

          @whooah1979: Thanks, that makes it much easier to work out.

          Are you a builder/engineer?

          Edit: A big, full bath could exceed that.

        •  

          @Euphemistic: Or just a large, tall person! Or a normal person with some heavy furniture! E.g. standing next to a bookcase full of books. Or even just the bookcase full of books on its own. If that's all an apartment floor can support I wonder why you don't hear about apartment floors collapsing all the time :-/

  • +2 votes

    Find one with the shower over bath? Very unlikely you'll find an apartment (of any size, letalone a one bedder) with a seperate shower/bathtub arrangement.

    • +1 vote

      This is pretty common scenario (shower + bath in one) - i find it surprising that you haven't seen one yet

      •  

        I've seen a few with the bath+shower combos. But at a similar price, I've also seen a few that are vastly more modern in all forms of design and furnishings, some are even much more spacious, but they just don't come with a pre-installed bathtub.

        I'ts like, do I want to live in the 90s for a bathtub, or in the 2010s without one?

        • +3 votes

          You said bathtub was a necessity, didn't you? So I would assume the former. Unless it's not really a necessity.

  • +3 votes

    Go nuts with a few tubes of silicon, seal your whole unit up and fill 'er up. Live Kevin Costner's Waterworld

  • +1 vote

    I have to ask, why must you have a bath tub? Do one of you have a handicap and are unable to use a shower? If we understand your needs more then we can probably suggest some suitable alternatives.

    •  

      I find it hard to imagine a type of handicap that would make it easier to use a bath than a shower. If you were paralysed for example there would be a danger of falling beneath the water and drowning and a lot of work for your partner to lift you in and out. Easier with a shower chair or shower wheelchair. Maybe if you had some sort of vertigo type thing where you can't stand up for longer than 1 minute

      •  

        I'm fine, I just really like being partially submerged.

        • +3 votes

          Stand in a bucket in the shower.

    •  

      Because Lush ;)

  •  

    Spa at local gym/pool?

    •  

      It’s illegal to have sex in public, mate.

      •  

        Spa at local swinger’s club?

    •  

      No longer welcome as we threw in 6 bath bombs…

  •  

    WEll….try to find an agrement with ur landlord maybe. sometimes they help u out with some money (it happened once with me) so you can make better options, or maybe he can buy it for you and raise the rent a bit. otherwide go for the better quality ones.