Australian citizenship interview and test

Hi,

Has anyone recently had their citizenship interview and test?

I have mine on Monday and was wondering if anyone had experience and or tips?

How long did the whole process take?
How long did you have to wait for your ceremony?

Thanks in advance

Comments

  • +13 votes

    or tips?

    Avoid using the words "bomb" and "jihad".

    • +1 vote

      what about god is great …

      allahhuakhbar !!!!!!!

      •  

        Depends, are you also suddenly reaching into a large puffy jacket/vest as you yell that out?

        (though less jokingly, I can see some people might have that reaction if they pass - in the same way as "thank the lord!" and it'd be totally innocent.)

  • +3 votes

    Learn Bogan, use slangs, have a can of VB in a stubbie near your side or in a pouch on your belt

    • +15 votes

      Interviewer: Q: "Do you want to become an Australian citizen ?"
      Applicant : "Nah, Yeah"
      Interviewer: Do you have any convictions past or pending in Australia or abroad ?
      Applicant: Yeah, Nah"
      Interviewer: You passed.

      •  

        Very true

      • +2 votes

        If you happen to meet an Indian interviewer, shake your head when you say yes.

      • +5 votes

        It used to be a requirement that you did have a criminal conviction to come to Australia. Things have changed.

    •  

      "have a can of VB in a stubbie"

      did you pass?

    •  

      here is a course I made with lots of practice questions.

      https://canvas.instructure.com/enroll/7CBGK6

      Hope it helps

  • +1 vote

    Strange. None of the people I helped ever had an interview - just the stupid test which is a waste of time as it is so easy.
    Is the interview new or does it only apply to people from certain countries?

    •  

      Interview is basically just a conversation held with a person to see how well you converse in English.

      •  

        Never happened with any of the people I helped. Maybe they were just lucky.

        •  

          Might be exempt if from a native English speaking country, or did secondary/tertiary studies in Australia/another English speaking country?

  •  

    What happens if you fail the test? Do you take it again when you are more "Australian"?

    • +2 votes

      Straight to Nauru.

  • +3 votes

    Try a practice test
    ABC, or
    2007 Test

  •  

    The test is something you should get 20/20 on - they tell you it's all from a booklet they give you. The interview is just "can you speak the english", barely there.

    The process is longer because they don't feel it's right if they are ready or competent - you should have to wait they think.

    And I've heard the wait for a citizenship ceremony has stretched out to silly levels (9 months plus) because of Dutton and his hard-on for still trying to change the law to his liking.

    •  

      Wait, weren't some councils forbidden from holding Citizenship ceremonies because they wanted to add additional stuff to it?

  • +9 votes

    I've been here for 50 years, thinking of becoming a citizen, I have permanent residency of course. Have a clean slate, not even a speeding ticket, cannot understand why people have problems assimilating, maybe this great country's not for them..

    •  

      When I was taking my test, there was a young woman who was making a scene because she needed a friend to sit with her to take the test, as she did not know a word of English.
      I do not know whether she passed or not. :)

      • +6 votes

        that should be an instant fail

      •  

        making a scene

        did not know a word of English

        That must've been rather amusing lol.

    • +3 votes

      Be aware that if you are convicted of an indictable offense, or fail the character test at any point you may be deported, 50 years of good behaviour will make no difference. And rightly so - if you are a guest in this country then you must abide by our laws, and it is our sovereign right to deport those that don't.

      A lot of New Zealand citizens have found this out the hard way.

      •  

        50 years of good behaviour will make no difference.

        They'd have to be what… 66 years old at least to have 50 years of good behaviour and a conviction yeah?

      • +2 votes

        a very real reason why people should considered naturalizing sooner rather than later if they plan on living in a country long term

    • +3 votes

      People don't have trouble assimilating…

      Its what other people determine is assimilating without knowing the person… which is often ignorantly wrong

      Often it comes down to migrants being of different colour, they can do nothing right,

      We forget the "wogs" had it way harder and way longer than the Asians and middle eastern migrants…
      They didn't assimilate over night, they didn't take 10 years to assimilate. They were only determined to have assimilated when society started picking on the Asians,

      People are ignorant of the fact that migrant communities are the norm has always been the norm.
      They're just easy scapegoats.

      Go to London… all the Aussies hang out together, come to Sydney… all the Kiwis and Brits hang out together

      • +3 votes

        all the Kiwis and Brits hang out together

        Sure but you can understand them.

        I'm an immigrant, and it seems to me most actual immigrants are in favour of immigrants assimilating more closely to Australian culture, and it's always Australian bleeding hearts who take the opposite view. Bleeding hearts, or second/third generation immigrants who grew up spoiled by Australia's great culture and environment and don't appreciate it compared to their 'home' countries.

        Go to any multicultural enclave, ask any hard-working immigrant and most of them will fight you if you said they and others shouldn't have to assimilate. The ones who came here and want to be here? They're here because of what Australia offers in terms of culture and environment.

        • +4 votes

          This point seems to ring true from my experiences, too. Immigrants who have done well to assimilate appear to hold quite a bit of disdain for those that don't, second only to the xenophobic 'super patriotic' types. When I've asked, the response has always been that they decided to come to a country because they believed it offers much better opportunities and quality of life, therefore trying to live in the new country like the previous 'lesser' country didn't make sense. On top of that, many flag a belief of laziness amongst those that don't assimilate, since they managed to do it and don't accept excuses for others failing to do so.

          I think an interesting point is that 'first mover' immigrants, from any given country with a different language or a significantly different culture, were forced to assimilate and adapt to their new country since they had to learn the new language and customs. Nowadays, immigrants are capable of moving here with a very weak grasp of language, so much so that I've interacted with many people that have lived here for over 15 years and can't hold a conversation in English that a 3 year old could. It's excellent that they have support in their community, but I have concerns that a divide may arise as these segregated communities become larger and more prominent, since not speaking the local language is a major determinant for your overall outcomes.

        •  

          @Strahany:

          ith many people that have lived here for over 15 years and can't hold a conversation in English that a 3 year old could

          Sounds like your exaggerating there… those people are the ones who come here as adults… they're not the future

          There are Italians from ww2 when they came that stil speak terrible english… their numbers are somewhat low

  •  

    I did mine two years ago.

    The interview was basically them just going through your application and asking you basic questions about the questions. The test was easy just do a few practice tests this weekend and you'll be fine.

  •  

    They'll go through the documents that you submitted, sight it against the originals, and make sure they are complete and in accordance to the requirements. That's basically the interview.

    They may ask you to fill in an additional declaration form, so it might be helpful to have details of your education/work/residential address history ready if they ask you to fill in the form.

    If all documents are in order, then they'll ask you to sit for the test right after the interview. If you pass then all that's left is for your application to be reviewed and approved.

  •  

    Hubby went for the interview on the 12th July. Don’t bother going early, they wouldn’t let us in till 5 mins before the appointment, You aren’t allowed to take anyone in while you have the interview.
    Hubby said they check everything you submitted when you applied and ask you questions and if you need any extra documents to submit.
    You can try for the test 3 times on the day, hubby failed the first time but got it the 2nd time.
    They asked for extra documents which I sent through the next day, now we are waiting for the ceremony which is in 6 months or so!
    Takes about 1 hour and half inside, depends on how many people are going in the same time as you’ hubby had about 10 people with him with the same appointment time.
    They have security guards at the door so you pretty much need to wait for them to open the door for you!

    •  

      Hi, thanks for your response.. What additional documents did your hubby have to provide? I was under the assumption that once you provided the documents for the application that they had everything they required…I'm going by the checklist I got from the email notification advising my appointment time.

      •  

        My husband was in the military overseas for 6 months in 2005 and I had to provide documents that he left. He also had to send the document with his passport photo and signature from the GP. I only sent the passport photo with signature the first time. Also his birth certificate

        •  

          Good luck by the way! Go to the building on the right, the one on the left is the passport office building. If you are coming by train get off central and go to the south concourse! I went through the north concourse and got lost !

        •  

          Thanks :-)

        •  

          @Lmwauuk:
          How did you go? Did you pass?

        •  

          Hi, thanks for asking, yes I did :-) happy days.

        •  

          @Lmwauuk: cool congrats!

  • -2 votes

    No. I was born here.

  •  

    The wait time for the ceremony is quite long, I believe they say 6+ months after the letter saying you're successful. Given the timing of your interview, there's a good chance yours will be on Australia Day… lots of councils hold their ceremonies then.

  •  

    There is a youtube page with practice questions for Aussie immigration. Its very easy. If you fail, they let you take the test again after few minutes.