Gift Ideas for Primary School Teacher

Looking for gift ideas for a primary school teacher, female teacher if that helps. Occasion is child transferring to another school.

Nothing too extravagant, I guess under $20 would be appropriate?

Cheers!

Comments

  • +2 votes

    Sounds like a job for a Parker Pen.

  • +3 votes

    Slab of VB. Get the kid to take it into class.

    On a more serious note, best gift I received as a teacher was a Swiss army knife. I use it almost everyday.

  • +3 votes

    Officeworks voucher/giftcard? Show me a primary school teacher who DOESN'T love textas, coloured paper and stickers!

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    any idea on the particular teachers interests?

    they normally have a 'thing'.

    collecting donkeys, like to knit etc

    .

  • +2 votes

    Bottle of wine.
    No mugs and no candles

    • +5 votes

      Please no mugs!

      My mum works at a primary school and has lost count of the mugs, tea towels, soap and butter biscuits she has received over the years.

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    Piece of paper with your mobile number in it

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    Why do people buy teachers gifts?

    • +5 votes

      to show appreciation to them shaping your kid??

      • -2 votes

        I forgot to include my friend is a teacher and she says most of the gifts she gets just go to waste

    • +5 votes

      Um because they work tirelessly to help your child realise their inner potential, often under thankless and stressful working conditions…

      • -2 votes

        well they do get paid, quite well too (in WA), so unless they are volunteering it's not really thankless.

    • +2 votes

      See, this is why Australia's education system is so lacklustre. There's just so little respect for the profession, and so little reward (even pay aside), there's just no reason to get into it unless you either are that passionate about helping kids, or literally can't find anything better.

      Which leads to this:

      Coalition ‘alarmed’ after students with Atars as low as 17.9 accepted into teaching

      Figures released to a Senate inquiry show one student was accepted to a teaching course at a Victorian uni in 2018 with a score of 17.9 out of a possible 99.95, while the lowest score accepted at another institution was 22.1.

      An ATAR of 17.9 is crazy!

      •  

        It's not so crazy, the country needs teachers but the pay is so low that not many people are attracted to the profession.

        • +1 vote

          On the one hand, yes that's exactly what I'm saying - other than an actual passion for helping kids, there's really too little reason for anyone to go into it. No money, and certainly no prestige or respect like there is in other countries.

          But also - do you have any idea just utterly how crazily low an ATAR of 17.9 is? I'm almost fairly certain you could take someone who's been raised by wolves their whole lives at the beginning of Year 11 and tutor them to a point where they could get a higher ATAR.

    •  

      An excellent question.
      We have never been a tipping country - yet the tipping culture is still worming its way in through other insidious means.
      This is essentially what we are talking about. Buying a teacher a gift is essentially a tip in a non-monetary form.
      So, the obvious question is whether people buy gifts for everyone else who does something for them or their children? Do you buy a gift for the postie, the cross-walk attendant, the karate teacher, the garbos etc etc etc? If not, why not?

      •  

        I think there is a difference between a "tipping culture" where a tip (or a gift) is expected or pseudo-mandatory, and just tipping or giving gifts.

        I tip in restaurants all the time if the service is good, and it usually is. I've also given various teachers, instructors, tutors, etc gifts, because I appreciate that there's a baseline for what they have to do that they go above and beyond.

        Not everything has to be a cold, emotion-less monetary transaction. Tipping and gifts isn't just about the money or value of the gift, it's about just showing gratitude in a way more than just 'Thanks'.

      •  

        At Christmas the postie and the garbos were left out some beer.

        Gifts for postie, paper boy are mainly memories

        Remembering the Days of the ‘Garbo’

        Not sure what a "cross-walk attendant" is. Sounds like an insidious US term worming its way into our Aussie lingo.

  • +3 votes

    Bottle of booze. Stick of a photo of your kid on the bottle and write beneath it (speech bubble) "I'm the reason you're drinking"

  •  

    candle, hand cream , basket of fruit,..and just add a handwritten card made by your child to thanks her..i m sure she will appreciate

    •  

      So this is why I have 20+ candles and a basket of handcream XD
      P.S. I'd go for high end branded stuff, travel size is awesome too.

  •  

    A nice box of chocolates or a food basket at least they get to eat it

  • +2 votes

    Get something they can use in the classroom. I volunteer at a school and I am shocked at what the schools will waste money on and then complain about small things that teachers need. Happy to buy big, expensive double monitors and plush executive chairs for the office staff, but say there is no money in the budget for repairing/replacing broken pencil sharpeners.

    Find out what the teacher is running out of, such as whiteboard markers, coloured pencils, things like sports toys, balls and the like, and just get a bunch of them. The gift will last a lot longer than a box of chocolates or some flowers…

  •  

    No mugs, alcohol or chocolate (all the cliche teacher presents).

  •  

    I actually think it's better to get something personal and not related to school work. Maybe something to help her relax like bath bombs.

  • +1 vote

    Just remember we don't expect anything. I always appreciated everything (even soap, biscuits, mugs). I also loved gifts where the student themselves chose it (they all knew I liked food so I used to get chocolates etc).

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      Thanks for being a teacher, I think it's one of more difficult and one of the most under-appreciated ones especially here.

  • +4 votes

    I'm a primary school teacher and I don't expect, or in fact want, gifts. I think it is crazy how this expectation has developed over the years.

    Others have put in lots of great suggestions, but I would personally prefer a card above all of those things. Particularly if it made special mention of something the family has particularly appreciated from me. I have kept the really thoughtful cards from my whole career and would cherish those well above gifts of monetary value.

    • +1 vote

      Thanks for being a teacher!

      I think OP would be sending a card with the gift… that how we've always done it haha. Do people send gifts without a card?

      • +1 vote

        Most of the end-of-year teacher gifts I've received have been sans card. The most treasured have been just cards, or small gifts that came with an especially thoughtful card.

        Edited to add: I've very lucky, I really love my job.

  •  

    A gift set from The Body Shop - they are in the $10 - $20 price range: https://www.thebodyshop.com/en-au/gifts/gifts-under-25/c/c14...

  •  

    A well done sticker and a participation trophy

  • +1 vote

    A cane.

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    Stationary, because your children will probably end up stealing the teachers ones all the time.

  • +4 votes

    We have decided to make something, basically to customise something we bought from the store with some appreciation messages. As least it’s going to be unique and shows some thought went into it.

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