expired Huggies Ultimate Jumbo 72 Pack $20 @ Big W

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Huggies ultimate nappies sizes 3-6 at big W $20 per box while stocks last

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  •  

    too bad this is not during the 10% storewide

  • +9 votes

    Thanks, bought some for my son jv

  • +1 vote

    Gee I'm glad I don't have to buy these things anymore. My kids grew older and eventually I stopped using them too.

  • +2 votes

    Do these have an expiry date? Mine is not due till 5yrs later but I don't want to miss out on a bargain.

    • +4 votes

      Usually around 3 years or so, but if you keep it in the freezer it should still be OK after 5

    • +3 votes

      Legitimately just asked a kinder teacher for you.
      She said they'll be fine in 5 years. They're Velcro and cotton which won't "go off" and they're sealed in plastic which will protect them from humidity.

      I personally would suggest investing the money elsewhere for 5 years, and saving the space in your house.

      Edit: not to mention, getting pregnant and carrying it all the way through isn't a sure thing (but hopefully it works out for you).

    •  

      We've had some left over from out first that we kept for the second. The glue seemed to deteriorate and weaken and change colour. I'm not sure if that was due to being stored in a plastic crate in the garage and heat/cold, or something else, but just something to be mindful of.

  • +1 vote

    It shows me $24 when I click on the link. Is there a coupen to drop it to $20?. Thanks for the post. Cheers

  •  

    Is it available instore and online?

  •  

    how this compared to costco?

    •  

      Costco cost $51.xx per box, for the 6-11 sizing you get 184 ultra dry nappies.
      Sometimes there are rebates of 10-15 dollars

  •  

    size 6 are so hard to find on sale its always 1-5

  • +1 vote

    these are on sale because theyre superseded; huggies have a 'new improved' unisex ultimate range now

    •  

      My kid was on the trial for the new ones, stuff all difference.

      Good discount especially with the 10%, bought enough to tie me over until the little one is potty trained.

  •  

    Bought 4 thanks OP

  •  

    Any free shipping codes ?

  •  

    That's gotta be the cheapest I've seen. I got a dozen. Ordered online first thing this morning and they were ready for pickup (Macquarie, North Ryde) within a couple of hours. Just fit in a trolley, and then the boot. Might now be done with purchasing nappies. Big w's price for these yesterday was $24, which is not too bad too - probably about as low as I've ever seen at Woolies.

  •  

    Just got this email:

    Unfortunately we are unable to supply the below items in your recent order.

    We apologise for the inconvenience caused. Your refund is expected to appear in your nominated payment option within 3-5 working days, depending on your financial institution.

  •  

    It's thousands of dollars cheaper over the life of a baby/toddler to use cloth nappies

    •  

      Really?

      •  

        Yep, $9,500 according to https://www.babybeehinds.com.au/store/pc/Cloth-Vs-Disposable...
        Even if you buy your disposable nappies at half the price, you're still ahead financially if you use cloth nappies instead.
        Also cloth nappies are a much better choice when it comes to the environment.
        australianscience.com.au says Australians use 5.6 million disposable nappies PER DAY, meaning over 2 billion nappies go into landfill around Australia each year. These can take up to 500 years to decompose. They report disposable nappies use 3 times more energy, 20 times more raw materials and twice the water than reusable nappies during manufacture.
        Sustainability Victoria says that it takes one cup of crude oil to make each disposable nappy.

  •  

    I was kidding. It is obvious to anyone who has kids and used disposables - of course I knew it costs thousands. But not $9,500 - dunno where you got that figure from. I checked your link, and it says $3250 - which is still inflated, given the biased source (a vendor of fancy cloth nappies).

    I am happy to pay the couple of grand per kid, to avoid having to wash shitty nappies, and have a bucket full of shit covered soaking nappies permanently residing in the laundry for a number of years. My mum went through that with my (much younger) sister, and only because she had a reaction to disposables.

    So, davebern, how many shitty nappies have you washed? Thousands? Was it worth the ~40cents per nappy, every 3rd or 4th one smeared with crap? Or is it really zero?

    My sister now has her own kid. She attempted to use cloth nappies (probably from a site like the one you linked). That didn't last long.

    •  

      sclyde2, the $3,250 figure you quoted from the website I referred to is only part of the story. It is not a fair comparison to just consider the costs of using disposable nappies for just the first 6 months of the baby. Of course you'll need nappies for much longer than 6 months for a baby/toddler. Therefore you should take into account the estimated cost of nappies for the whole period that the child needs nappies.
      The site I referred to says:
      A newborn will have an average of 6500 nappy changes from birth to toilet training ($3250)
      From 6 months, baby still has about 5000 more nappy changes to go ($2500)
      From 12 months, baby still has about 3800 more nappy changes to go ($1900)
      From 18 months, baby still has about 2500 more nappy changes to go ($1250)
      From 24 months, baby still has about 1200 more nappy changes to go ($600)
      If you add up all these figures (not just the first figure of $3,250), you will see how I got to the figure of $9,500.
      I accept that the site I quoted may have inflated some of the calculations as it is a vendor of cloth nappies, but even if you discount their estimate of $9,500 by 50% (ie down to $4,750), you are still spending thousands of dollars more using disposable nappies v cloth nappies.
      If you're happy to pay several thousands of dollars more per child if dealing with poo bothers you that much, that's fine, but my initial post was to highlight the substantial savings that you can make if you choose cloth nappies over disposable nappies.
      I understand that many people nowadays can't tolerate dealing with poo like our parents did.
      I have 4 children…we used cloth nappies with all of them, enabling us to save many thousands of dollars…so yes, it was worth it as I like to save as much money as I can. That's one of the reasons why we were able to buy our first home earlier than most others and eventually retire at the age of 55.
      We even travelled around Oz, camping all the way with our first 2 kids and both were in cloth nappies! I accept that most people nowadays could not do what we did.
      Personally washing dirty nappies didn't both me, but I know that most people nowadays can't tolerate this.
      I guess it all comes down to 2 factors in choosing cloth nappies v disposable nappies: Is saving many thousands of dollars per child important to you and do you care about the environment? For us, the answer is yes on both counts, so that's why we chose cloth nappies.

      •  

        davebern, up your comprehension skills. those numbers aren't additive. the 6500 nappies (or $3250 @ $0.50 per nappy) is from birth until toilet training, not just the first 6 months. it says "from birth until toilet training" right there. do you really think people spend $3250 on nappies in the first 6 months? if that was true, they'd be going through a nappy every 20 minutes the kid was awake. did your kids go through close to 36 nappies a day?

        and, on this caring for the environment thing, i think you are in a glass house throwing stones. so, what chemicals did you use to clean the nappies with? moreover, if you really cared so much about the environment, you wouldn't have 4 kids.

  •  

    Oh sorry sclyde2, I misread the article. Thanks for clarifying that. Yep, the article estimates that $3,250 would be spent on disposable nappies for a baby.
    My initial post that it's cheaper to use cloth nappies instead of disposable nappies is still valid (maybe just a couple of thousands of dollars per baby though), but not to the extent that I first thought.
    We didn't use chemicals when cleaning our nappies. We just rinsed off the poo from a tap and then washed our nappies in our washing machine. That's how our parents did it.
    When we had our kids many years ago, the environmental impacts of disposable nappies was not understood or even considered. We used cloth nappies like all our parents did.
    As this is an Oz Bargain site where people are interested in saving money, I thought it was appropriate to make them aware that there are cost savings if you use cloth nappies instead of disposable nappies, and also the environmental impacts so that parents can make an informed decision. At the end of the day, it's up to the parents to decide which way to go, but at least they're making an informed decision. I'm not telling parents what type of nappy to use, just pointing out that there is a cheaper option available, but I acknowledge that not most people can't tolerate cleaning cloth nappies like we did.
    Cheers