Smoke from Hyundai i30 Exhaust

I have a 3 year old Hyundai i30, goes great, only 30000km, no issues, serviced about 6 weeks ago.

My dad borrowed it on Tuesday, drove about 30min, all good. Stopped at grocery shop and did some shopping, started heading home, someone waved him down, there was smoke pouring from exhaust. Pulled over, lifted bonnet, nothing coming from there, just out the back. It settled and he drove the 2km to home, still smoky. Sat it there for about 30mins, took a drive around the block a few times, nothing. Took at 15min drive later that afternoon, nothing. Drove it yesterday, nothing.

I'm obviously taking it to get looked at, but any ideas?

Comments

    • +3 votes

      White smoke, unburnt excess fuel
      Blue smoke, burning oil
      Black smoke, burnt excess fuel
      Grey smoke, mix burnt/unburnt excess fuel

      White “steam”, coolant into combustion

  • +2 votes

    Might have been too much oil used during the service.

    • +1 vote

      Even if that was 6 weeks ago?

      •  

        Still possible. The oil has to heat up and expand before it overflows. Perhaps this happened when your father drove it? Was it particularly hot? Bad traffic?

  • +4 votes

    sort of reminds me of cheech and chong

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ovpwPgoutJk

    @1:18

  • +1 vote

    What colour?

  • +4 votes

    Petrol or diesel?

  • +1 vote

    are you sure your dad wasn't just rolling coal?

  • +2 votes

    Could be a couple of things, including oil or coolant leaking into the engine through a damaged gasket. You should check the fluid levels and see if either of these are low/look funny.

    •  

      Yeh we checked oil and coolant, all seemed fine. But gasket was one of the things I read also, so keen to get it all checked out.

      •  

        Hmm. Well one thing I would do if you haven't already would be to check the error codes. You need an OBD2 scanning tool for that. That will guide you in the right direction at least. If you don't have one, and don't know anyone that does, your options are to take your chances with an ebay cheapy, or take it to an autoelectrician and pay him $50~ to read the codes for you.

        Another thing you could do, is drive it around the block a few times like before, but then get a second person to rev it in neutral. Its possible that the gasket is only partially broken, so that under normal idle load it functions fine, but when the engine is warm and the pressure is high it gives way. Rev it a few times to 3-4k and see what happens.

        My guess at the moment though is either a dirty butterfly valve or a faulty Maf or oxygen sensor. With cars, the power is controlled by precisely matching the air going to the engine with the petrol injected into it. If something blocks the air, and more fuel gets injected than air, the burn is imcomplete, and you end up with a bunch of sooty fumes.
        The butterfly valve is what lets the air go through, the Maf (mass air flow) tells the computer how much air is going through, and the oxygen sensor tells the computer how much oxygen is in the air.

        If anyone of these elements is bad it will cause the smoke to happen.

  • +1 vote

    Sounds like he was doing an Italian tune up. Pity modern engines are designed for this.

  • +3 votes

    Doesn't matter what the issue is. Take it to Hyundai and tell them to fix it under warranty.

  •  

    One other things that does it is old fuel. I doubt this is your problem. If you store fuel for a while (say 6 months or more) or start a lawn mower that hasn't been used in ages - hooley dooley.

  •  

    Don't put diesel in it if it is a petrol.
    Don't put petrol in it if it is a diesel.

    • +1 vote

      I used to work in a servo. A lady came in and asked where the diesel was. I pointed the pump out to her, she filled up and drove off.

      Got a call half an hour later. "Why did you tell me to put diesel in it when it's an unleaded car? My car has broken down now!"

      "I didn't. You came into the store and asked where the diesel pump was which I pointed it out to you. We have it all on camera if you feel like taking it further."

      Never heard from her again.

  • +1 vote

    Common problem for Hyundai I30s, I have had the same problem several times on my I30, it is carbon build up in the the throttle body.
    It generally builds up when you drive your car for short distances and drive it too gently. It needs an occasional thrashing.
    Best product to clean the carbon is seafoam.
    Check out youtube videos on this product.

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