Suggest Me a Bike for General Use

Hi All,
We have never used a bike on Australian roads and still scared but we want to start riding soon.

Riding to work is not an option for me as it is too far. So, it will be for general use and mainly for going to the gym and back about 6 km in total, three times a week. My wife may ride to work but she is not sure.

I have seen this deal https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/491477 and missed it before I could decide if I want to spend $1000 for a bike.

I am happy to spend this much of the amount if it is worth it and get a better value of money but $250 seems realistic for a beginner.

If it is a unisex bike then we can share and buy a second bike if we use it more frequently. If not then open to see suggestion for individual bikes.

Comments

  • -2 votes

    Youll be the coolest couple on the block with this beauty - https://www.pushys.com.au/cruzee-two-12-aluminium-balance-bi...
    If you and your significant other are the same height one bike should be fine, but if one is shorter or has longer legs you will have to continually adjust seat height.

    • +1 vote

      ^ This

      Once you try an ebike you'll be hooked, and plenty come in unisex versions.

  •  

    I am happy to spend this much of the amount if it is worth it and get a better value of money but $250 seems realistic for a beginner.

    Gumtree? You can get a good 2nd hand bike for less than $250. Just make sure the tyres, brakes and chains are in relatively good condition.

  • +1 vote

    You probably don't want a road bike to begin with. I would either go with a mountain bike or a hybrid/commuter bike. They'll have a much more comfortable sitting position that a road bike.

    I would go to a few local bike shops and talk to them. Giant, trek, merida are good popular brands. If you're looking to get more bang for your buck, reid is a popular low cost bike shop but my experience is that they don't have the quality of the bigger brands work off selling a large number of bikes (bike mechanics aren't as good local bike shops). Anaconda and decathlon have okay quality bikes, but since they don't specialise in bikes they won't be as knowledgeable as a local bike shop. I would probably avoid online bike shops because you would want to try out your bike before you buy it.

    • +1 vote

      Forgot to add, definitely avoid the Target, KMart, Big W type bikes.

      • +1 vote

        This is good advice. If you want cheap, Decathlon may be a good bet if you have a store nearby. They often have sales on.

        •  

          Yes, Don’t buy a Kmart (target, big w etc) bike. Get a second hand brand name one if your budget is at Kmart levels. They are easy enough to fix if there is anything wrong and if you can’t service it yourself a bike shop will often tell you not to bother with your Kmart bike.

          Keep in mind that typically anaconda and decathlon bikes RRP are a bit optimistic. Their sale price is usually a better indication of true value.

    •  

      Look at that and recognise that it’s a folding bike and they are only suitable for riding if you actually need to fold them. Otherwise They have too many compromises to make a good bike to ride.

  •  

    Thanks for the suggestions guys. I got enough clues to begin.

  •  

    $250 is a bit too low for a decent reliable bike.

    I highly recommend one of the "Big Four" brand names: Giant, Trek, Specialized or Cannondale. All have extensive representation in the Australian market.

    Some specific models below. Within each model below is a range in price points from ~$600 to $1500 based on the level of 'features' on the same basic frame. The base model ~$600 from each one would be fine. You can't really go wrong.

    Trek FX
    Giant Advanced SL
    Giant Cross City
    Cannondale Quick

    • +1 vote

      $250 is a bit too low for a decent reliable bike.

      $250 is too low for a new bike. Second hand however, perfect price range.

      •  

        True, if you know what you are looking for. As they indicated they would be open to spending up to $1000, I would still advocate that a new bike sized and set up from a bike shop is the best way to go at that price point. This is what I always suggest to newbies as it's the least daunting. The bike will just work, feel comfortable and most places will usually give a free tune-up a few weeks into ownership to make sure everything is working properly. The alternative is someone picking up something second hand based on price alone, doesn't feel comfortable riding it every day because it's the wrong size or issues with the brakes and drivetrain so the person gives up quickly thinking this "cycling thing" is too difficult/uncomfortable. Sure it's possible to ascertain and fix these issues yourself but it's a lot to ask for someone new to cycling who are just trying to get used to the new activity of cycling on roads.

        •  

          Thanks for the suggestions. I get your points, a new bike is a way to go.
          I'll look at the bikes you suggested. We went to visit 99bikes over the weekend and the sales guy suggested some good bikes around $850 mark.

          I think that is the range we will aim for.

          However, my confusion starts from here, if I look at the range, there are plenty of the bike within $830-870 range and which one to pick is difficult. Moreover, they don't stock brands you suggested so I am going to find another store around Parramatta and try.

          https://www.99bikes.com.au/bikes?cat=622&price=-1000&product...

          •  

            @ggmm2013123: That’s a decent price range for a hybrid. Should get a good bike for that. At the end of the day, similar price bikes are very similar. They might have different parts mix as different brands target different parts eg better derailleurs on one brand, but better cranks on another. Pick one that fits you, feels good and looks good, that way you are more likely to ride it. The salesperson may steer you toward a special as better value, but if you think it’s ugly, you might not get the value because you don’t ride it.

            Merida is a good brand, the make many frame for other companies. Giant do the same, massive factory spitting out frames from lots of different brands.

            Apollo had its heyday a while ago but still make decent bikes, typically a little cheaper than the main brands.

  •  

    Hi There,

    My recommendations are Giant and Reid from my own experiences. There are a lot of other bikes brand out there that are just as reputable.

    From a brief search I would go for this:
    $400 - https://www.reidbikes.com/product/urban-x0/

    Because you and your wife probably have different body types, I would recommend learning how to fit yourself for the bike as well as choosing the right size frame. This can make you ride faster and more efficiently.

    Get yourself some riding shoes or shoe straps. A $500 bike can be faster with clip on shoes than a $3000 dollar bike with flat pedals.

    It's not worth spending 250 dollars on a bike because you're a beginner, you will outgrow it very quickly and regret it.

    There's no reason to go for a mountain bike with suspension because you will need to maintain those extra parts and they aren't that great at those price points. Fat mud tyres are also slower, which means you need more effort for your commute. A good commuter bikes is plenty comfy enough, buy some good road tyres and you'll be flying.

    •  

      Thanks, I'll certainly look at this bike over the weekend.

    •  

      I'd avoid anything with a freewheel, which most Reid entry level bikes have.
      I also am not a fan of the twist shifters or revo shifters. I'd avoid them too
      The Reid Urban X2 is a much better bike for the money than the X0.

      •  

        Thanks..I am going to check it out tomorrow. It is also on the sale for $599.

        Another question..Do I need mudguards?

      •  

        freewheel

        For the uninitiated a freewheel is generally 7sp or less. It has a bearing between the gears and the spokes, which is not at the end of the axle. It is inferior to a freehub to which a cassette is fitted over a splined part. The bearings are at the end of the axle on a free hub which reduces the chance of the axle bending. Freehubs come in 7speed and higher.

        Only need mudguards if you ride in the rain and don’t want to get the muddy stripe up your back.

  •  

    Thank you all for your help and suggestions.

    Bought the Urban X2 without mudguards. It would have been very difficult to decide without your assistance.

    Thanks.

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