Air Asia Credit Card Chargeback - Possible?

  • as per their website, we can only get full credit or change flight

  • unable to contact Air Asia via live chat

  • no direct number to call Air Asia

I'm l supposed to fly out in 3 days time

Can I raise a credit card chargeback with my bank? Anyone done this? Was it successful?

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Comments

  • +1 vote

    I have raised requests for Charge for my flights also. The person from ANZ on the phone said it's likely I'll get it approved as the flights have been cancelled and I've not reqesuted their silly vouchers.

    Still waiting for my 28 Degress one, which I had to submit online.

  •  

    ask your bank. i'm sure they've already been asked the same question many many times already

    • +1 vote

      Bank said I can dispute the transaction. But I'm not sure if it will be successful given Air Asia is a budget airline and not good with refunds. I'm just worried the chargeback gets rejected and I lose the option of getting credit/change flight wirh Air Asia

      •  

        Bank said I can dispute the transaction.

        You can dispute every and any transaction. That isn't up to the bank.

        not sure if it will be successful given Air Asia

        The bank then send air asia a request, and its up to air asia to respond. If they don't respond in a certain time, it gets refunded.

        I'm just worried the chargeback gets rejected and I lose the option of getting credit/change flight wirh Air Asia

        If you put the charge back in, then yes air asia will most likely fight it, and void your booking.

        Just take the credit/change of flight. If you think you're getting a refund, then you're in for a rude shock. The ACCC has said many times now, airlines don't have to refund, only offer credit/change of flights.

  • +1 vote

    They have no legal obligation as per their terms to give you a refund
    they are offering credits/vouchers for canceled flights (as is their right)
    You can claim these through their website

    You want to charge back on your credit card so you can get around their terms which you agreed to when you bought your ticket.
    They will most likely fight the charge back with the bank and will be able to show you agreed to the terms when you bought your tickets.

    Even the ACCC have said repeatedly that the airlines are within their rights legally to issue credits and in some cases do not need to give full refunds.

    All you are probably going to achieve is a credit on your credit card now, a reversal of said credit later by your bank when Air Asia wins their chargeback appeal and you will also be prevented from flying Air Asia again.

    Everyone is being so entitled atm, at the end of the day they are acting within their legal rights, they do not have to fully refund the tickets and lets be honest if they refunded everyone this would cause already stuffed airlines a major cashflow problem.

    •  

      Because some people commented on Air Asia fb that we should raise a dispute to skip dealing with the airline. So I’m just wondering if anyone has disputed successfully without getting blacklisted etc.

    • +1 vote

      OP paid for a flight, and AirAsia could not deliver the service. So give the OP back their money, it's that simple.

      I had to get do a charge-back on a gym, because they took a fortnight of payment, knowing that the government was going to shutdown all gyms the next day. 28 deg sided with me, and I got my money back.

      I doubt the gym will blacklist me, that make money from commission bysigning people up, and will be desperate because it will be a few months of lock-down so that's no commissions for them

      • +1 vote

        They agreed to the terms and conditions when they purhcased their ticket
        they are entitled to a credit or voucher under those terms
        charging back is an attempt to get around the agreed terms and WILL 100% result in being Blacklisted by Air Asia
        The terms agreed to also state that a charge back will result in "refusal to carry in all future instances"

        As posted below…

        The ACCC COVID-19 Information states:
        If your travel is cancelled the ACCC expects that you will receive a refund or other remedy, such as a credit note or voucher, in most circumstances.
        However, if your travel is cancelled due to government restrictions, this impacts your rights under the consumer guarantees.
        You may still be entitled to a refund under the terms and conditions of your ticket.
        You should contact the business directly to request a refund or other remedy such as a credit note or voucher.
        The ACCC encourages all businesses to treat consumers fairly in these exceptional circumstances.

        You also just did the charge back i assume to the gym?
        As someone who deals with a bank as a merchant, you get your money back straight away when you do a charge back.
        The merchant is provided a chance to dispute it, we do and when we win (which Air Asia will in this case) they get their money and its again taken from the credit card (as per the chargeback system agreed to when you initiate one)

        • +1 vote

          You also just did the charge back i assume to the gym?
          As someone who deals with a bank as a merchant, you get your money back straight away when you do a charge back.
          The merchant is provided a chance to dispute it, we do and when we win (which Air Asia will in this case) they get their money and its again taken from the credit card (as per the chargeback system agreed to when you initiate one)

          Yep, so many think the bank agrees with them for allow them to do a chargeback. News flash people, the bank will let you do a chargeback on every single transaction.

          They also think they 'won' as they got their money back. Only time will tell.

      •  

        I had to get do a charge-back on a gym, because they took a fortnight of payment, knowing that the government was going to shutdown all gyms the next day

        and? At the time it was charged to your card the gym WASN'T shutdown, it was RUMOURED they might be shutdown. Maybe tomorrow, maybe the day after. Maybe never.

        Regardless, if you bothered to read past the headline of the shutdown, you would see any unused gym membership fees would be 'credited' and rolled over to when they open again. You hadn't been missing out. So that days you paid for unused, would be credit to when they open again. All memberships had been 'paused'

        I doubt the gym will blacklist me

        Most likely not, but they'll think you're scum and make you pay what is owing etc when you try to return next.

    •  

      You want to charge back on your credit card so you can get around their terms which you agreed to when you bought your ticket.

      It depends. An airline’s compensation policy operates in addition to the consumer guarantees under the Australian Consumer Law and cannot exclude them. Otherwise it might constitute an 'unfair contract'.

      https://www.accc.gov.au/media-release/airlines-need-to-compl...

      • +1 vote

        Thanks for linking the ACCC release from 2017

        The ACCC COVID-19 Information states:
        If your travel is cancelled the ACCC expects that you will receive a refund or other remedy, such as a credit note or voucher, in most circumstances.
        However, if your travel is cancelled due to government restrictions, this impacts your rights under the consumer guarantees.
        You may still be entitled to a refund under the terms and conditions of your ticket.
        You should contact the business directly to request a refund or other remedy such as a credit note or voucher.
        The ACCC encourages all businesses to treat consumers fairly in these exceptional circumstances.

        So.. Air Asia are within their rights to offer a credit or voucher.
        They are acting within their rights, charging back is trying to get around the terms agreed to when the ticket was purchased, my point stands.

        https://www.accc.gov.au/consumers/consumer-rights-guarantees...

  •  

    I'm l supposed to fly out in 3 days time

    Has your flight been cancelled or you just no longer want to fly?

    If it hasn't been cancelled, then you'll be a no show.

    Can I raise a credit card chargeback with my bank?

    You can, but if its not successful you will be charged a fee

    Was it successful?

    Why would it be? As you said

    as per their website, we can only get full credit or change flight

    They are offering a credit or a change of flight. They are 'delivering' the product as per the terms you purchased against.

    Keep trying to contact them or can you change it via the booking request?

    •  

      It’s cancelled. Air Asia is hibernating their fleet. Plus there’s travel ban on both departure and arrival countries.

      The credit only lasts for 1 year (365 days) or change flight (up until oct 2020). If covid19 is still serious, not sure what happens to the credit.

      Their customer services are hopeless. No one is there to answer except for a virtual bot that guides you to do credit/change flight.

      • -1 vote

        It’s cancelled

        ok then, if its cancelled, then you won't be doing this

        I'm l supposed to fly out in 3 days time

        You'll get a credit and move on.

        The credit only lasts for 1 year (365 days)

        Its basically a 'gift card' arrangement, so yes the credit expiries in 1 year, but that doesn't mean you need to fly in that period.

        So a few days before the credit expires, book a flight thats 6-12 months away. So you basically have anything up to 2 years from today to book a flight.

        Their customer services are hopeless.

        You booked the cheapest flight around with a BUDGET airline and then complain about the lack of 'service'. WOW who would have thought that might happen.

  •  

    I suggest using their refund/chat at
    https://support.airasia.com/s/article/How-do-I-submit-my-ref...
    I get a reference from there, wait a week or so, & then I go to their facebook and post it there. It seems to work for me.

  • +2 votes

    As far as I'm concerned the T&C's should only be applicable when I make the request to cancel or change a flight. If the airline decides to cancel then a full refund should be offered.

    But of course what I think and what the law states are 2 different beasts.

    I've made chargebacks against SIA (Amex), Air India & Malaysia Air (ANZ), with the last one a confirmed success. All non-refundable business tickets.

    I hope sometime in the near future Australia will follow European & American rules concerning airline cancellations. If you had booked under their terms, you would be automatically entitled to a refund.

    Under Aussie terms, there's nothing stopping airlines cancelling a flight, giving a voucher, then making you rebook at a higher fare price.

    • +1 vote

      We (kind of) do. Australian Consumer law still applies to airlines and quite a few have come unstuck in the psat. Jetstar was a larger recent one where they were found to be in breach of ACL. 'Non refundable' doesn't necessarily mean you can't get your money back, regardless of it being a cheaper fare or budget carrier.

      The issue that often comes up for airlines is you are dealing with foreign companies who have no real appreciation of this and don't realise that Aus consumer guarantees are in addition to rights under their policy. It gets worse when you add in a third party booking site who pick and choose their application of their own and the airline's T&Cs. Credit card chargebacks can sometimes be the best way of forcing a discussion as many will stand their ground despite being in breach of ACL and rely on you not willing or being able to push it to formal legal action…

      With that being said, a chargebacks also get used when people don't get their own way or for flat out fraud so use it wisely and sparingly (and when you're in the right - which is actually pretty often with airlines).

      https://www.accc.gov.au/media-release/jetstar-to-pay-195-mil...

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