Dell G7 17 7700 i7-10750H 16GB RAM 512GB SSD RTX 2070 Max P 144hz Display

For all of us that have bought this amazing laptop, here are some points that can help you set it up:

  • Change RAID to AHCI to avoid reinstalling Windows in the future if we use a second drive:
    Completely recommended to reinstall Windows from scratch as it will boost your battery life from 2 hours to up to 5-7 hours compared with the factory Windows.
    Youtube tutorial to change to AHCI

  • Mounting bracket, screws, and heatsink for secondary SSD: Thanks @PediatricLemon
    https://www.amazon.com.au/gp/product/B07RRNC5WD/ref=ppx_od_d...

  • To measure heat and wattage, use HWiNFO64 and RivaTuner server: Thanks @kml22
    Tutorial measure temp

  • To check the hardware inside, you can use CPU-Z:
    CPU-Z

  • Undervolting GPU guide for the Dell G7 17 7700: Thanks @Dipaty!

For some reason Dell has set in the BIOS of the GPU to automatically overclock up to 1900mhz when gaming (despite the GPU being rated at 1450mhz). However, when it does this it pulls obscene voltages through it, causing a lot of unnecessary heat with little to no real performance gain.
The solution? Limit the voltage that can be pulled through the GPU and thus, the maximum clock that it can push up to.

  1. Open MSI Afterburner.

  2. Press Ctrl + F to open the Volatge Frequency curvegraphic.

3.1. To limit the maximum GPU voltage to 0.8 and maximum clock to 1560mhz double click in the point and a yellow dotted line should appear like this:
https://imgur.com/a/Mu0ncSx

3.2. Select the point in the intersection of 1560 and 800 and click Ctrl + L, changing the curve to this shape:
https://imgur.com/L7xzHzf

A quick guide on how to use MSI Afterburner to limit the GPU voltage, view these video guides:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N2xABgzp_1w
https://youtu.be/rV0tWKLAprg

  • Undervolting CPU guide for the Dell G7 17 7700: Thanks again @Dipaty!

Thanks to reddit users VanGoghComplex and Snoozehead for finding the intial fix and their thorough troubleshooting.

Initially, the laptop has undervolting disabled in the BIOS, but there is a way to unlock it…

PLEASE NOTE: I take no responsibility for any damage you may cause to your system, this is an "Advanced" process so proceed with caution.

If you're using BIOS version 1.2 (or earlier) you can skip Step 1 and use the values 0x3e for CFG Lock and 0xda for OC Lock.
If you're using a different BIOS version (or a different Dell laptop altogether) please follow from Step 1.

Step 1: Finding the correct values to change in the BIOS.
a) Download this Python script to extract the BIOS files from the dell bios exe file. https://github.com/platomav/BIOSUtilities/blob/master/Dell%2...
You will need to also install Python for this section to work: https://www.python.org/downloads/

b) Download UEFITool from this link to search in the BIOS files for the location of the values we need to find. https://github.com/LongSoft/UEFITool

c) Download the Dell BIOS file from the dell website that you currently have installed (if you're using an old bios version and would like to unlock undervolting then install that BIOS version first).

d) Download Universal IFR Extractor from this link to search for the names of the values we need to set to 0 in the BIOS to unlock the undervolt. http://bios-mods.com/pub/donovan6000/Software/Universal%20IF...

e) Place the Dell BIOS exe file in the same folder as the python script and then run the script. The script should open a command-prompt looking window, you'll need to type out the exact filepath to the DELL BIOS exe file. This will then create a new folder with the content files inside.

f) Launch UEFITool and then open (open image file) the first file that was extracted by the python script (in my case it's called "1 — 1 System BIOS with BiosGuard v1.2.0.bin").

g) Go to Action>Search and then go to the "Text" tab and type in "CFG Lock" (without the quotation marks). In the bottom section of the window it should find 1 result. Double-click the result to navigate to it (in my case it took me to a line that says "PE32 image section". Right click this line and press "Extract as is". Save the extracted file.

h) Launch Universal IFR Extractor and navigate to the file that you extract in "g)". This will save a text document with readable information. YAY! A document that we can actually read and isn't just code…

i) Open the file that was created in "h)"and search (CTRL+F) for "CFG Lock". This should take you to a line that will look something like this: "0x74FAC Setting: CFG Lock, Variable: 0x3E {0..". The section we are looking for is what it says after Variable: (in this case 0x3E).
This is your CFG Lock code. This is the name of the section that we need to set to 0 in your BIOS. A few lines under this section you should see a section that looks something like this: "0x74FCD Setting: Overclocking Lock, Variable: 0xDA {0.." This is the code for your OC Lock (in this case 0xDA).

Now that we've got our CFG Lock and OC Lock codes we can proceed to Step 2…
.
.

Step 2: Changing the values of your CFG Lock and OC Lock in your BIOS.
a)Format a spare USB drive to FAT32 on a GUID partition map.
If you're unsure whether your drive is GUID or not, go to Disk Manager in windows, right click the USB drive and go to Properties>Volumes and it'll say it next to partition style.
If you're unsure of how to change to a GUID partition map, please follow these instructions: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/storage/disk...

b) Make a folder in the root of the USB (the main folder of the USB) called EFI.

c) Make a folder in EFI called BOOT.

d) Download this file (the one called grubx64.efi) and place it in the BOOT folder. https://github.com/XDleader555/grub_setup_var/releases/tag/v...

e) Rename the file to bootx64.efi

f) Reboot to your BIOS (spam F2 on your keyboard when booting up the laptop).

g) Disable Secure Boot in your BIOS. Save/Apply Changes and Exit.

h) Spam F12 when booting to load the One Time Boot Menu and select your USB Drive from the list of options. This will boot into the USB.

i) Once it has loaded, type in the following command (be very sure you type it in correctly): setup_var CpuSetup 0x3e 0x0
PLEASE NOTE: If you did Step 1 of this guide, then replace "0x3e" with the code you got for your CFG Lock. Make sure to keep the 0x0 there though as this is the command that turns the lock off.

j) Type in the following command (be very sure you type it in correctly): setup_var CpuSetup 0xda 0x0
PLEASE NOTE: If you did Step 1 of this guide, then replace "0xda" with the code you got for your OC Lock. Make sure to keep the 0x0 there though as this is the command that turns the lock off.

NOTE: All of the 0 in the previous points are actual zeros (the number, not the letter).

k) Type in the following command: reboot

l) Spam F2 whilst booting to load back into your BIOS settings and re-enable Secure Boot. Save/Apply Changes and Exit.
PLEASE NOTE: Some people have reported that they need to also reset the BIOS back to Factory Settings (not default settings) to make the undervolt unlock, but I personally didn't need to.

CONGRATULATIONS! You've just unlocked undervolting on your laptop! Give yourself a pat on the back ;)
Now please feel free to pick your favourite undervolting program (Throttlestop or Intel XTU), I personally used Throttlestop.

Here's a guide for Throttlestop: https://www.ultrabookreview.com/31385-the-throttlestop-guide...
Here's a guide for Intel XTU: https://www.notebookcheck.net/Intel-Extreme-Tuning-Utility-X...

Please remember to test your undervolts for stability using your favourite CPU intentive benchmarking software. I personally used Cinebench R20 and the built in tests of Throttlestop.

I personally have an undervolt of -100mv going right now, but I'm still in the testing stage.
You WILL have different results to me as this all relies on the good ol' silicone lottery - some people will be lucky and get laptops that can achieve a significant undervolt, and unfortunately some wont.

Good Luck!

PS: our eternal thanks to @kml22 for his efforts to clarify the 2070 Max P and all the info provided.

Comments

  • 1st comment - thanks for making the thread mate :D

    • Haha, come on man, I know you have discovered very useful info about the laptop, don't waste the first comment! Just kidding, thank you so much for sharing your research, it will save us a ton of time.

      Well, I will write my first impressions with the laptop:

      It is bloody awesome!!

      None of my fears about the thermals and the poor building construction, as shown in the youtube review and few comments in the thread, have come to be true. The quality is pretty good, sturdy, screen is quite nice, no wobbly trackpad, responsive keyboard, and beautiful lightning RGBs.
      Regarding the performance, that's the cherry on top of the cake. Played a little AC Odyssey, with the battery I get around 2 hours in maximum quality, and average 50fps and I couldn't hear the fans. Can't wait to rev it up and play at ultra plugged tomorrow!

      • Hahaha
        I just wanted to reserve it for later use :P
        I've decided to play around with undervolting now instead of waiting a week, so I'll put up a full guide with my personal results in that first post when I've finished testing :)

        The laptop is amazing, far beyond my expectations

      • +1 for battery! I had it unplugged most of the day yesterday before I started playing with undervolting in the evening and its amazing! I got an Acer Nitro from a previous deal and it lasts no more than 1.5 hours even with light use :|

        • Idk why I'm replying to myself but I'm totally stoked with the battery.

          Last night at 12:50am I unplugged the charger. 100% battery, 40% brightness, Balanced power profile, Screen 'always on' and sleep disabled and Wifi/Bluetooth turned on.

          It is now 1:45pm the following day and the battery still has 10% remaining. ETA is 1hr 44m remaining and I'm inclined to believe it.

          I must admit that at 15 or 20% remaining it changed its power profile to Battery Saver but the Wifi and screen have still been on 100% of the time.

          I have literally never had a laptop with such a good battery on idle. Well bloody done Dell!

          • @drakarn_123: Final comment on battery, I promise. Lasted just over 14 hours with the screen on at 40% brightness with Wifi and Bluetooth on, with Balanced profile

          • @drakarn_123: Do you have any tricks to share with us? I have unplugged it to watch a film, and it doesn't get longer than 2 hours with brightness 3 levels down from the highest.
            Weird thing is that it lasts the same as playing games.

            • @catchthemall: Oh wow, that's exactly what it was like with my old laptop… No, I don't have any tricks really, but have you installed much onto it? And do you notice whether the fan spins up at all when watching a movie? When mine lasted for 14 hours I literally didn't hear the fan spin up once as there was so little running.

              • @drakarn_123: Even worse than my old one which lasts 4 hours with the same capacity.

                Nop, haven't installed crazy amounts of software, checked in ccleaner that there are not programs that run at startup and no software is draining power in the task manager.
                Couldn't hear the fans. Also I undervolted the CPU to -0.8, so the wattage is around 5W with the Turbo disabled. And not using GPU…. I need to find what is off in my settings.

            • @catchthemall: Try doing a fresh install if you are up for it, i've noticed my battery life has improved dramatically, before the laptop wouldn't even last 90 mins on 50% brightness and just web browsing.

              • @clokeyyy: Nice, so it may be that dell has put a ton of bloatware in the background.
                How much time are you getting now? Just weighting if it worths reinstalling. Thanks!

  • Anyone knows how to keep the rgb lights stay on?

  • i'd want to know what undervolt settings people used

  • I was initially planning to put this in the first comment but unfortunately it wont let me edit the post anymore, so here it goes…

    An undervolting guide for the Dell G7 17 7700

    Thanks to reddit users VanGoghComplex and Snoozehead for finding the intial fix and their thorough troubleshooting.

    Initially, the laptop has undervolting disabled in the BIOS, but there is a way to unlock it…

    PLEASE NOTE: I take no responsibility for any damage you may cause to your system, this is an "Advanced" process so proceed with caution.

    If you're using BIOS version 1.2 (or earlier) you can skip Step 1 and use the values 0x3e for CFG Lock and 0xda for OC Lock.
    If you're using a different BIOS version (or a different Dell laptop altogether) please follow from Step 1.

    Step 1: Finding the correct values to change in the BIOS.

    a) Download this Python script to extract the BIOS files from the dell bios exe file. https://github.com/platomav/BIOSUtilities/blob/master/Dell%2...
    You will need to also install Python for this section to work: https://www.python.org/downloads/

    b) Download UEFITool from this link to search in the BIOS files for the location of the values we need to find. https://github.com/LongSoft/UEFITool

    c) Download the Dell BIOS file from the dell website that you currently have installed (if you're using an old bios version and would like to unlock undervolting then install that BIOS version first).

    d) Download Universal IFR Extractor from this link to search for the names of the values we need to set to 0 in the BIOS to unlock the undervolt. http://bios-mods.com/pub/donovan6000/Software/Universal%20IF...

    e) Place the Dell BIOS exe file in the same folder as the python script and then run the script. The script should open a command-prompt looking window, you'll need to type out the exact filepath to the DELL BIOS exe file. This will then create a new folder with the content files inside.

    f) Launch UEFITool and then open (open image file) the first file that was extracted by the python script (in my case it's called "1 — 1 System BIOS with BiosGuard v1.2.0.bin").

    g) Go to Action>Search and then go to the "Text" tab and type in "CFG Lock" (without the quotation marks). In the bottom section of the window it should find 1 result. Double-click the result to navigate to it (in my case it took me to a line that says "PE32 image section". Right click this line and press "Extract as is". Save the extracted file.

    h) Launch Universal IFR Extractor and navigate to the file that you extract in "g)". This will save a text document with readable information. YAY! A document that we can actually read and isn't just code…

    i) Open the file that was created in "h)"and search (CTRL+F) for "CFG Lock". This should take you to a line that will look something like this: "0x74FAC Setting: CFG Lock, Variable: 0x3E {0..". The section we are looking for is what it says after Variable: (in this case 0x3E).
    This is your CFG Lock code. This is the name of the section that we need to set to 0 in your BIOS. A few lines under this section you should see a section that looks something like this: "0x74FCD Setting: Overclocking Lock, Variable: 0xDA {0.." This is the code for your OC Lock (in this case 0xDA).

    Now that we've got our CFG Lock and OC Lock codes we can proceed to Step 2…
    .
    .

    Step 2: Changing the values of your CFG Lock and OC Lock in your BIOS.

    a)Format a spare USB drive to FAT32 on a GUID partition map.
    If you're unsure whether your drive is GUID or not, go to Disk Manager in windows, right click the USB drive and go to Properties>Volumes and it'll say it next to partition style.
    If you're unsure of how to change to a GUID partition map, please follow these instructions: https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-server/storage/disk...

    b) Make a folder in the root of the USB (the main folder of the USB) called EFI.

    c) Make a folder in EFI called BOOT.

    d) Download this file (the one called grubx64.efi) and place it in the BOOT folder. https://github.com/XDleader555/grub_setup_var/releases/tag/v...

    e) Rename the file to bootx64.efi

    f) Reboot to your BIOS (spam F2 on your keyboard when booting up the laptop).

    g) Disable Secure Boot in your BIOS. Save/Apply Changes and Exit.

    h) Spam F12 when booting to load the One Time Boot Menu and select your USB Drive from the list of options. This will boot into the USB.

    i) Once it has loaded, type in the following command (be very sure you type it in correctly): setup_var CpuSetup 0x3e 0x0
    PLEASE NOTE: If you did Step 1 of this guide, then replace "0x3e" with the code you got for your CFG Lock. Make sure to keep the 0x0 there though as this is the command that turns the lock off.

    j) Type in the following command (be very sure you type it in correctly): setup_var CpuSetup 0xda 0x0
    PLEASE NOTE: If you did Step 1 of this guide, then replace "0xda" with the code you got for your OC Lock. Make sure to keep the 0x0 there though as this is the command that turns the lock off.

    NOTE: All of the 0 in the previous points are actual zeros (the number, not the letter).

    k) Type in the following command: reboot

    l) Spam F2 whilst booting to load back into your BIOS settings and re-enable Secure Boot. Save/Apply Changes and Exit.
    PLEASE NOTE: Some people have reported that they need to also reset the BIOS back to Factory Settings (not default settings) to make the undervolt unlock, but I personally didn't need to.

    CONGRATULATIONS! You've just unlocked undervolting on your laptop! Give yourself a pat on the back ;)
    Now please feel free to pick your favourite undervolting program (Throttlestop or Intel XTU), I personally used Throttlestop.

    Here's a guide for Throttlestop: https://www.ultrabookreview.com/31385-the-throttlestop-guide...

    Here's a guide for Intel XTU: https://www.notebookcheck.net/Intel-Extreme-Tuning-Utility-X...

    Please remember to test your undervolts for stability using your favourite CPU intentive benchmarking software. I personally used Cinebench R20 and the built in tests of Throttlestop.

    I personally have an undervolt of -100mv going right now, but I'm still in the testing stage.
    You WILL have different results to me as this all relies on the good ol' silicone lottery - some people will be lucky and get laptops that can achieve a significant undervolt, and unfortunately some wont.

    Good Luck!
    • Added at the beginning of the post! Thanks, mate great job!

    • I've been trying to follow this guide today but I can't get the system to boot from the USB drive. It's definitely GUID, and formatted to FAT32 with the correct folders and the file renamed, but it won't boot when I select it from the bios. I've tried reformatting the disk multiple times, and I have turned safeboot off. Any ideas?

  • nice job guys. title description, its a max p not a super.

  • Hello G7 peeps

    Anyone who bought this Dell G7 and need Microsoft Office 365?
    I will be purchasing a 12 month Family account for up to 6 users. There are 3 spots left..
    $19 per user for 12 months.
    You can extend after 12 months aswell.
    Link here https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/559384

    https://www.officeworks.com.au/shop/officeworks/p/microsoft-...

  • Can anyone recommend a decent case/sleeve for the G7? My old laptop bag won't fit it.

  • Has anyone managed to find a screw / bracket for the second drive yet? I've installed a second drive and currently have the heatsink from the main drive holding it in (as I saw another member do). But would prefer to put the heatsink back if possible to find something for the second drive.

    This machine is a beast though. Played a few games at max settings and the frame rate was silky smooth. Runs a bit hot but im hesitant to undervolt it.

    • What temperatures have you been experiencing while gaming ?

      • I have a laptop cooling pad setup. Only tested the temperatures in MX vs ATV All out.

        I wasnt sure which temp was which for CPU and GPU. Pretty sure though GPU was the higher. Hitting 85 at one point. Fans kicked in and it hovered around 80ish.

        While the other was hovering around 75 and went up to 80ish. Given the OSD didnt show which was which I could have it back to front. But in 1080p on max settings it never dropped below 100fps and was nearly always at 144fps or just under.

        I did play other games to test performance. But they were all before installing the OSD for temperature in games.

    • I ordered these (m2x4mm) on eBay based on the screws list of the manual

      M2 Wafer Head 3-12mm Laptop Notebook Back Cover Screws Phillips Black Oxide
      Item Description:

      Screw Type: Wafer Head Screws, Low Profile Head
      Material: Black Oxide Steel
      Drive Type: Phillips Head
      Thread Diameter: M2 - 2mm
      Thread Pitch: 0.40mm
      Average Head Thickness: 0.75mm
      Average Head Width: 3.9mm - 4.2mm
      Screws Available as 2/5/10pcs

      • Nice. Keep us updated. If it works i would think a few in here will be grabbing them.

      • Thanks for sharing

      • How'd you go with this? I'm assuming they've arrived by now?
        I'm close to purchasing these as I don't think Dell will provide screws and the brackets etc based on other comments here.

        • Yes they arrived yesterday. The screws are the right size under the assumption at the time that Dell has included or will be providing the additional bracket. But as it turns out they do not (see the response I got from Dell Technical Support) so these will end up being additional screws if ever I lose any from taking this laptop apart.

          I've since found a screw in my collection of parts that's seems to work.

          https://imgbb.com/Mn1SJGL
          https://imgbb.com/M1T8hBw

          Will post if I find a standoff that would be suitable.

    • Has anyone tried to locate the mounting bracket part number using the service tag id on the support page?

      I spent 30min being transferred from Customer Care to spare parts sales to technical support, then another 10min listening to the guy tell me they need the laptop’s service tag to identify the part. They won’t try to look it up based on the model number either.

      • Even with the service tag, I'd be very surprised if they provide the part #. On reddit another guy was trying to find out the same thing from Dell support and they told him that it's not for sale, wont be for sale in the future and they will not provide the part#.
        Hopefully someone here will have better luck?

      • Just buy another G7, rip out the mounting bracket and return the laptop, screw dell.

    • I've dropped an email to their sales/support to ask why these weren't shipped with the bracket and heat spreaders. The service manual clearly states it should be included. So not sure why it didn't ship it. I included a pic of it and a snippet of the diagram from the service manual as reference..

      See what they come back with. These aren't exactly "off the shelf" parts.

      • Received this reply from Dell today:

        "Based on our higher engineer's advise, with regard to your inquiry regarding a 2nd SSD bracket and screws, this option is only available for G7 models specifically ordered with 2 SSDs.

        As your specific order only came with 1 SSD, the only SSD bracket that was included is the one securing the current Solid State drive, as per your order.

        Dell will not be able to send you a 2nd SSD bracket if your system was only ordered with 1 SSD, however, if you would liek to add a 2nd SSD pucrashed from a 3rd party source, we can provide you with a billable quotation for the 2nd SSD bracket and screws.

        If you would like to receive a billable quotation from us, simply reply to this email thread with your preferred service address, and we will send you the quote within 24-48 business hours."

        • If you get a quote from them please report back and let us know how much they want.

          • @schmuppet: I second this, my primary SSD which doesn't have the bracket covering it anymore is getting really hot under load reaching a temperature of 78c degrees

        • Yes.. I am getting this as well.

          Also putting in an official complaint too.. channeling the inner "Karen" on this one because it really isn't fair nor is it feasible to get it from a 3rd party source. I'd rather they jack up the overall cost of the unit by ten bucks to include something as required as this. Honestly, the cost to make these parts will only be around 3 bucks to be frank.

          See what they come back with.

        • Maybe we should all go to Dell’s Facebook page to complain about this. This might raise some awareness to get them do something.

        • Ah as I suspected. The manual can be read in that way that the mounting bracket can be moved when you "replace" the existing SSD.
          I wonder if something like this then will be worth purchasing:
          https://www.amazon.com.au/dp/B07RRNC5WD/?coliid=I3NB8N50UHMN...

          Was one of the first ones that came up. Probably other options available.

        • Lol.. Don't bother with the quote from Dell. Got an email like this:

          "I was following up on your case and I wanted to update you that we have submitted a request to generate a billable quotation for an additional Solid State Drive bracket and screws, however, we have been advised that our Spare Parts team can only process quotations for minor parts with Labor costs included. Unfortunately we do not have an option to quote a "parts only"quote. As the reason for requesting a quote for a 2nd SSD bracket is to install a 3rd part Solid State drive, then even the option for labor to install a part is not covered as installation of 3rd party parts is Out of Scope for Dell.

          In this case, the best option, should you intend to upgrade the storage capacity of your system using 3rd party parts, is to order the bracket externally."

          Note the part of the quote that says no parts only. Means that the quotation that are sending includes the labour required for a Dell engineer to come onsite to your home and put it in for you. LOL..

          This is very sad.. honestly.

          • @bchliu: This is terrible on Dell's part, why the hell would the laptop only ship with one M.2 mounting bracket in the first place where it has two SSD bays!
            Its like buying a four door car but the car only comes with one seat!
            so stupid, only having one 512GB SSD is not enough for a gaming laptop in my opinion

            • @clokeyyy: Ok.. here's more of the struggle:

              My Response:

              "Hi Joaquin / Dell Support,
              I am really not happy with this situation and unable to find a suitable source for this part. I will NEED this to be able to use my laptop as intended.
              If Dell is not willing to supply this part because you do not see it as a service you offer, then can you please inform me of:
              1. Part number (of the actual bracket / mount)
              2. Where I can order it from

              Unless this is fulfilled, I will make a formal complaint to both your customer complaints AND file an official complaint with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. I am really NOT happy that I cannot use this laptop to it’s capacity as designed and intended. No other laptop manufacturer will make their customers look for an obscure part that costs them $2 to make"

              Dell's Response:

              "Good Day!

              The part number for the 2nd SSD bracket is KKCTR.

              We will not be able to provide you with information as to where you may be able to order it from outside of Dell.

              If you still believe that this system is not fit for purpose as you have indicated in thread below, then we can only offer you a refund for this order."

              My Response:

              "Hi Dell Support,

              I’m sorry.. this is the most incredible thing I have heard from “Customer Support”. Dell would rather lose the money on me returning a laptop with couriers and other expenses such as refurbishing and restocking than to send me a $2 part from their parts catalogue? Or even helping a customer with finding a third party channel to obtain this part? Do you realise the brand damage this does?

              I honestly only need the screw bracket for me to screw the SSD down to the chassis. Thats it. I am not even chasing up for the heat spreader anymore because I can probably find 3rd party ones of those reasonably easy. This part is just impossible to find and just need Dell to just send me.

              BTW.. KKCTR doesn’t even come up with any valid parts for any systems out there."

              I am truly wasting my time here I think.. Sigh..
              Am I asking for too much here?

        • Never did get a response, then got this today from Dell. Disappointing indeed. I responded to their suggestion to just use a screw with the issue there is no standoff without the adapter to screw into. I also would expect a laptop with 2 SSD slots easily accessible, to be able to actually use them. I can see on my support case the parts requested (no part numbers), but Parts just refuse to supply them. Anyone have a 3D printer to try making the adapter?

          "I am very sorry for the late update. I wanted to update you that we have submitted a request to generate a billable quotation for an additional Solid State Drive bracket and screws.

          However, we have been advised that our Spare Parts team can only process quotations for minor parts with labor (installation technician) costs included. Unfortunately we do not have an option to quote a "Parts Only"quote for only the bracket and screws as these are considered minor parts. As the reason for requesting a quote for a 2nd SSD bracket is to install an additional Solid State drive, then even the option for labor to install a part is not covered as installation of 3rd party parts is Out of Scope for Dell.

          In this case, the best option, should you intend to upgrade the storage capacity of your system using non-Dell parts, is to order the bracket externally; or otherwise you can install the m.2 SSD without any brackets, which you can just screw it in place using any M2x4 screws."

          • @RockmanRock: I've ordered the kit from Amazon as per OP's post and link.
            https://www.amazon.com.au/gp/product/B07RRNC5WD/ref=ppx_od_d...

            Looks like you can screw it in without the mount. Dynamite459 has managed to screw it in using a particular type of screw:
            https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/554619?page=8#comment-9205...

            Got the kit to get the heat spreader as well. I'm sure if I can find my box of computer screws and stuff I will be able to find something that will fit. But don't want it to overheat (even though the second stick I am putting in is the lower clocked SATA 2TB one). I'm waiting for the Black Friday sales and grabbing another 2TB NVME as the main drive to replace the 500GB in there now.

            • @bchliu: Looks good, I'll try the same. I have a samsung evo 970 plus 1TB in the original slot now without a spreader, the larger drives seem to run a lot cooler - I was surprised when I opened up and felt how hot the 500GB was to the touch.

              • @RockmanRock: The original stick is NVME and is running at pretty high clocks, hence why it will overheat if not heat sinked properly. Gets worse when the laptop's ambient heat builds up because of heat from the CPU and GPU..

                • @bchliu: Yeah, and it all comes back to the Dell response "you don't need any bracket at all" - so you just put it on the first one for the hell of it Dell lol?

            • @bchliu: Didn't work for me with that kit, tested it today.

              See image https://imgur.com/a/kcmkwPC
              Still no depth in the green area for the standoffs to screw into without the adapter, without cutting the chassis at the red areas and raising it, or getting a tapping bit.

              At least the additional heatsink has fitted so far.

              I'm done taking this laptop apart now because I will break something soon, so that's probably it from me unless anyone has any other ideas.

              • @RockmanRock: Wait. did your kit already arrive? I'm still waiting for mine. Just re-reading Dynamite459's description - they had had to "Tap thread" the existing hole so that the screw can be held on properly. This final pic looked like this:

                https://ibb.co/M1T8hBw

                (Used a special screw and not the mounted screw like what is included in the SSD heat sink kit). Not sure how he did this though.. I'll PM him and ask.

  • I've received mine and have done some brief temperature testing on a few games..

    I've found less graphics intense games like Valorant have the GPU at 60 and CPU ~80 degrees while something like Battlefield V on ultra settings with RTX on and found the CPU hitting 100 degrees at times, FPS was hovering around 50-60 which I thought was quite impressive for a laptop on these settings. Max TDP I recorded was 95W on the GPU.

    It looks like the GPU cooling solution does better than the CPU as mentioned in the main thread, will be interesting once some more undervolting results from those looking into it!

  • Hello everyone, I am going to be trying this today, could anyone just confirm that they have tried it and that it actually works (I am on newest BIOS update from Dell)

    • Undervolting the CPU?
      I've tried it and it worked for me haha
      So have a few others that private messaged me about it :)

      • Thanks mate, I just sat down with my bro and we will be going through these instructions and see how we go.

        • No worries, feel free to let me know if you have any questions. It can seem daunting at the start but it's actually pretty easy. Just make sure you write down the commands in Step 2 exactly as they are written in the guide and everything should go really smoothly