For The Yamaha Soundbar Owners

Or any soundbar really.
The Yamaha has upward firing speakers when it's sat on a TV unit which isn't ideal. I used some L brackets from Bunnings and the TV's wall mounts to fit the soundbar on top of the TV so the speakers face the listener.

Old news but discovered these things on Amazon,
https://www.amazon.com.au/Mounting-Dream-Universal-Detachabl...

Worthy of a thought if you haven't already done something similar.

Comments

  • Oh interesting I hadn’t really thought about that

  • Isnt the point of the upfiring speakers that they hit the roof and them immerse the listening in 3D sound?

    • You are correct, its a design feature, not a flaw.

      • Any flaw you can turn into a feature is a bonus :-)

        I had my skyscraper design rejected. Too many floors apparently.

    • Only when the audio source has that specific feature.
      My Yamaha doesn't have Atmos and the soundbar's wall mounts are on the underside when it's sat on a tv stand so when wall mounted the speakers face the listener.

      Atmos stuff is on an angle I believe so it reflects to the listener.

  • I have a Yamaha soudbar and it sounds 'louder' when i just tried it, but it doesn't sound right. I reckon you are losing the depth or 3d effect of the sound for a small gain in volume?

    Copy/pasted from here - first google result for me: https://thehometheaterdiy.com/mount-a-soundbar-vertically
    Can You Mount a Soundbar Vertically?
    In most cases, no. Soundbars are designed to put sound in certain parts of the room. When you rotate a soundbar 90 degrees to mount it vertically, your left and right speaker channels sound like they're coming from the ceiling and floor. In general, it isn't a good idea to mount a soundbar vertically.
    Soundbars are designed to put sound in certain parts of the room. When you rotate a soundbar 90 degrees to mount it vertically, your left and right speaker channels sound like they’re coming from the ceiling and floor.

    • "When you rotate a soundbar 90 degrees to mount it vertically, your left and right speaker channels sound like they’re coming from the ceiling and floor."

      That article you linked is talking about rotating the soundbar 90deg sideways and having running up the wall on one side of the TV, rather than rotating it fwd so the speakers are facing the listener.
      That would definitely be a bad thing unless you had a 2nd one on the other side doing L & R if you could separate out the channels.

      Soundbars that face forward have their wall mounts on the back so it maintains that orientation on the wall. Yamaha has the wall mounts underneath so you're meant to rotate it to wall mount it so it fires forward as per other soundbars.

      • Yes, you are right, that article does refer to tipping it sideways, which seems even more absurd than tilting it forwards 90 degrees - though the premise that a soundbar is designed to emit sound at certain angles was my point.

        You could just google yourself, as the top results all say the same thing. Sites that offer assistance and suggestions with installation options all refer to something along the lines of "The correct placement of the soundbar is necessary for optimal acoustical performance" or “Basically they send around different ‘beams’ of sound, so there’s a unique beam for each channel – front left, front right, centre, surround left and surround right. They are designed to bounce sound off the wall to give you a proper surround sound effect. They produce five discrete channels of sound rather than just a virtual sound effect.”

        Yamaha's own help hub talks about how sound is distributed from the FRONT of the soundbar at certain angles, and how far it should be from the side walls to bounce sound correctly.

        Yamaha's site even mentions when wall mounting to make sure the speakers face the front. Rotating it 90degrees and pointing the top firing speakers to the listener as you have done means that the front firing speakers are now facing down?

        Wall mounts for soundbars allow you to mount to the wall, BUT they are still positioned as standard. I have no issue you doing your own soundbar whichever way you want, but I'm not sure coming here and encouraging others to install it differently to the recommended method is a good idea…

        Each to their own I guess