Help Me Prepare!

Hi everyone

I want thank you in advance for reading through this!

So I had a job interview week before last week with the managing director of this company but my first impression wasnt really great. I came across really nervous but the positionI was interveiwing for needs regular interactions with internal and external people .As I was referred by my former manager from current job, I was given a second chance to be interviewed by the team leader and the manger for that position. I aced those interviews. However, he wasnt still convinced. Please note my current job requires a lot of interactions too and I am doing really great here. In my most recent performance review I have been told that I was the number one employee within our team for 2020.

Anyways, he called me up today and gave a week to prove him wrong that my nervousness will not cause an issue. Could you please suggest me some ideas what should I do now?

P.S. he didnt ask me to come for another interview or any just gave me week to find a way to assure him that I can do the job

Comments

  • +1 vote

    If you fake it now, don’t you think they’ll find out during your probation period, and let you go anyway?

    If you got what it takes, tell us what you’ll say and we could critique it.

    Btw. Welcome aboard ;)

    Member Since
    1 hour 38 min ago

  • what is the job? what brings you after you get the job?

  • Anyways, he called me up today and gave a week to prove him wrong that my nervousness will not cause an issue.

    I think you've blown it.

    If you've had two interviews for the same role and the hiring manager/recruiting officer/person in charge still doesn't want you, or even worse is coming up with even more convoluted ways for you to prove your "worth" to them, then you're not going to suddenly become a brand-new individual on attempt number three and absolutely floor everyone with some new-found charisma and charm that didn't know you had a week ago.

    Also, as much as I can't f__king stand HR Jedi mind tricks and their arbitrary selection criteria, it just looks bad at this point to be turned down twice already and it really doesn't pay to start a job where you desperately struggled to make it into the role in the first place and literally had to beg and plead to be accepted. They'd be dangling your tenuous standing with them over your head from the day you started there and more to the point, if you have any self-respect, it's pretty humiliating to be treated like a circus animal jumping through hoops to impress your betters.

    It sounds like your interview game was a little rusty on the first round and you just needed some more "practice interviews" before you were well and truly ready.

    If I'm job-hunting, I purposely apply for some bullsh*t roles I'm not interested in merely in the hopes that I can get an interview with them just to get some practice interviews out of the way and then be well-prepared for the ones I do care about.

    Who knows, you might have honestly dodged a bullet by missing out on this job. Any manager who comes up with any cute ideas like "I'll give you a week to prove that you belong here" sounds like an absolute power-tripping a**hole to work for and is most likely someone you should avoid.

    Could you please suggest me some ideas what should I do now?

    Just tell him what Jamie Foxx said to his boss in Collateral.

    • This. The manager sounds like a jerk, cut your losses,

      • +1 vote

        Maybe not. OP did say, the role requires regular interaction with external people. Visible signs of nervousness is not a desirable trait for such a role.

        • I bet the job is like a door to door sales person which obviously need a 10 on the charisma stat and preferably a matching intelligence stat too so you don't look like an idiot when they find out you've bee blabbing nonsense, smooth talking your way out of everything with nonfactual things or partial factual things….

    • A couple of things I would contradict there:

      If they are still talking after 2 bad interviews, it could be a sign that they really want it to work. A flat out no is easier for a hiring manager than having to deal with the follow up calls. They don't even need reasons to say no anymore - most don't give valid feedback for fear of saying something wrong and getting a discrimination accusation, just "you were in the final few, but the other candidate was better suited.

      Being turned down twice and still trying can be a sign of persistance and growth. I've been in that situation - overlooked twice due to others having better connections (not that they said that). Neither of those lasted 3 months and I got the job. Regional manager confessed 3 years later that he should have gone with me first time.
      I've also hired people that I rejected the first time. They came better prepared the next time, and they could explain things better than they could the first time.

    • If I'm job-hunting, I purposely apply for some bullsh*t roles I'm not interested in merely in the hopes that I can get an interview with them just to get some practice interviews out of the way and then be well-prepared for the ones I do care about.

      [End of interview]
      Interviewer: "You're hired!"
      Gnostikos: "Err, sorry I only came here to practice my interview so I'll decline the job offer - thanks anyways."
      Interviewer: ಠ_ಠ
      Gnostikos: "Well, bye!"

      Any manager who comes up with any cute ideas like "I'll give you a week to prove that you belong here" sounds like an absolute power-tripping a**hole to work for and is most likely someone you should avoid.

      What if it's the other way around where you offer to work for free for a week to find out if you're any good at the job or and if you like it? How would the hiring manager feel about that? That'd make you sound ….kinda desperate for a job to entice them?

      • [End of interview]
        Interviewer: "You're hired!"
        Gnostikos: "Err, sorry I only came here to practice my interview so I'll decline the job offer - thanks anyways."
        Interviewer: ಠ_ಠ
        Gnostikos: "Well, bye!"

        The days of being offered a job on the spot after an interview are long gone, at least in my industry, thanks to the wonders of bureaucratic HR recruitment processes and round and round after excessive interviews.

        Besides, turning down roles is something I usually have to do when I'm applying for jobs anyway, not because I'm so spectacularly in-demand but because I often find out after the interview that either the job description was incredibly deceptive and I'm actually no longer interested in doing the work they really want from the prospective candidate or because the company looked like a sh*tshow to work for.

        What if it's the other way around where you offer to work for free for a week to find out if you're any good at the job or and if you like it? How would the hiring manager feel about that? That'd make you sound ….kinda desperate for a job to entice them?

        That's what probationary periods are for; you stick around for 3 months and if you find out you're not suitable then you can leave no questions asked and with little notice. Everyone wins.

        If you're an unpaid intern doing work experience, that's one thing, but if you're a mature-age candidate with some experience in your field then there is no way in hell you should ever be working for free.

        That is doing a disservice to yourself, your industry and the entire workforce as a whole by normalising a ridiculous expectation of free labour that some managers actually do have; not to mention Australia already has one of the highest rates of unpaid overtime per capita in the world.

        • That's what probationary periods are for; you stick around for 3 months and if you find out you're not suitable then you can leave no questions asked and with little notice. Everyone wins.

          Yes, but the thing is how do you get to that if they won't hire you or try you out? Thus….

          If you're an unpaid intern doing work experience, that's one thing, but if you're a mature-age candidate with some experience in your field then there is no way in hell you should ever be working for free.

          as an incentive to get your foot in the door would be offer to work for free….he's losing nothing, except well maybe unless you do something wrong and they have to pay for it - for example trying to get an apprenticeship as a mechanic but you're not even an apprentice yet, just signed up to work for free(maybe you can chalk it down as "work experience" mature age or not and whether or not you have the experience in the field or zero experience and just wanted to try this out for yourself…) to prove you're fit for the role from both sides and then suddenly you fark up a service somehow and the employer has to pay for it and then promptly removes you from the before probation period if there's even a term for that….

          And what if you're not an intern and just happens to be a random passerby, with or without relevant skills and experience in the field?

          That is doing a disservice to yourself, your industry and the entire workforce as a whole by normalising a ridiculous expectation of free labour that some managers actually do have; not to mention Australia already has one of the highest rates of unpaid overtime per capita in the world.

          Wait, so everyone is not supposed to offer an incentive to work for free, either as "work experience" or to try out the place so that maybe….just maybe they might like you over some random internet (or even caller who cold calls rather than going in person) person submitting their resume and cover letter who've they've never met compared to someone who just walks in with all the papers and even offers to work for free for a week or however long they think is enough for them to decide of both parties? Shit…. I've been used….. What is this feeling I am having….?

  • +6 votes

    positionI
    interveiwing
    manger
    wasnt
    suggest me

    I’ve reread your post.

    Feedback for you, you may want to check over your written communication ( if this is the standard you’ve adopted ), especially dealing with external customers.

    There are other items that could be better, but I’ll leave that for fellow Bargainers to identify and share.

  • its an impossible task so just ring back. tell him that, and ask what he would have said when asked that question and then write it down, thank him and hang up.

  • Stay where you are given that you "have been told that I was the number one employee within our team for 2020"…. this makes you a valuable person and they treat you right….. Once you move you have to rebuild everything and the grass is not always greener on the other side….
    However, you current employer may be blowing smoke up your a#$ and pretending that you are awesome so that you leave the organisation which is what they want!

  • After two interviews giving you a week to prove yourself sounds like it could be some sort of weird power play. I’d probably just leave it.

  • Sooo… is this to be the next Defence Minister?

    Good Luck with that.

    • And what do we think is going to happen to the current incumbent in that position?

      Hardly gonna call her boss a "lying cow" methinks.

  • Sounds like a really toxic workplace.

    I'd avoid it. So many red flags.

  • Interviews are a two way street. What does the manager deciding to give you a chance instead of other candidates tell you?

    They would still hire people who are bad? Imagine their workplace on how they hire like that?

  • Anyways, he called me up today and gave a week to prove him wrong that my nervousness will not cause an issue.

    He wants you to bang his wife while he watches.