TPG CSG Waiver

Im about to take over ownership of the TPG account from my housemate as she is leaving and they are asking me to sign a CSG Waiver form.
Seems really dodgy. Does anyone know about this?
What are the impacts?

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Comments

  • +4 votes

    You can decline to sign it. But TPG can decline to do business with you.

    If you don't have a voice service the waiver doesn't mean much. It mostly applied to voice lines.

    https://www.acma.gov.au/electrical-products-and-devices

    Fun fact. When I moved to iinet I made $600 in credit from the CSG as they didn't transfer my voice service within the CSG timelines. Someone at work put me onto it as Iinet obviously kept quiet about it.

    •  

      I had a $1911.80 refund for a delay in connecting a phone line with iiNet. Took a while though, TIO got involved.
      They would have just passed the charge through to Telstra or whoever the wholesaler was.

      These were the days prior to NBN when everyone had a POTS.

    •  

      If you don't have a voice service the waiver doesn't mean much. It mostly applied to voice lines.

      This.

      The waivers that ISPs make all subscribers agree to when signing up for their services relate exclusively to the bundled VOIP service (they should have a pre-recorded statement about this they'll play on the phone when you sign up), which is something they're mandated by law to provide (as there are no more analogue POTS services for landline phones in most areas) but ever since the MTM NBN roll-out, they've removed all technical support for VOIP services due to the costs involved and the fact that the usage of home VOIP phones has fallen to negligible levels.

      So essentially they agree to provide you a VOIP service/number, but if you have any issues with it, they don't care and they have no SLA/guarantees with regards to VOIP service quality/reliability. Normally, if your downstream Internet data speeds and line quality are fine then your VOIP service will also work without issue but for marginal customers on poor-quality lines with low sync speeds, their VOIP quality will be equally unreliable.

    •  

      Fun fact - when I signed up for iiNet many moons ago (pre-TPG buyout) I had to sign a CSG waiver.

      As you and Gnostikos point out, it's because there's things they can't guarantee with the voice service as it is VOIP. So you need to sign the waver for them to provide you a VOIP service that may not meet the CSG.

      As always but, make sure you read the fine print.

  • +1 vote

    Personally, I wouldn’t sign it, but I wouldn’t use TPG because they want me to sign it. It basically means you have no recourse if things go wrong, and no expectation of timely fixes.

  •  

    Yeah just make your ex housemate cancel and sign up with someone else.

  •  

    CSG is only applicable to landline phone services. If you have a Naked service, or some other service that doesn't have a physical phone service attached (like VOIP), then you aren't entitled to it anyway (because you haven't signed up for a landline). Nothing suss by asking you to sign it unless you have a landline.

    https://www.acma.gov.au/customer-service-guarantee

  •  

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