Purchased a Lemon - 2004 BMW

My daughters partner purchased a second hand 2004 BMW in December from a car yard for $9000.

Problems started within 3 months and it’s been on going. He finally got them to agree on warranty cover that he paid $1000 extra for. They were 3 major oil leaks. They occurred a couple of weeks later along with something else (can’t remember what). They paid the oil leaks even though they said they weren’t covered as the other issue was covered so they fixed both however this was at a mechanics of their choice, not of his choice and it took weeks. Apparently They admitted in email that there were issues with the car when it was sold.

Now the electrics have gone. Another phone call made and they will cover as it’s included in the warranty.

However the problems have been one after the other. They clearly sold a dodgy car and he just waits for the next issue, which is completely unacceptable. The whole circle of waiting days to see if they’ll cover and then getting it fixed which also takes ages and the cost of hiring a car or Uber’s…

Is there anything he can do?

Any advice appreciated.

Comments

  • +337

    purchased a second hand BMW

    Sorry. I couldn't read past this part.

    • +15

      you missed out on this bit
      "The whole circle of waiting days to see if they’ll cover and then getting it fixed which also takes ages and the cost of hiring a car or Uber’s…
      Is there anything he can do ?"

      Umm, sell it ASAP.
      .

      • +54

        Ok. I've made a cup of tea, mentally prepared myself, confirmed my superannuation insurance status. I'm going in for the rest now.

        Edit: currently awaiting ambulance and air lift. I have split my sides open.

      • +6

        Umm, sell it ASAP.

        what, and make it someone elses problem? If he tried to sell it and was honest about the issues, he would never find a buyer who wouldn't buy it for more than parts.

        • +1

          I hate this part of used cars.

        • Send it to auction.

        • dchurch1 exactly my thoughts.

    • +53

      Unfortunately I managed to read upto the point where op said it was a 2004 model BMW

      You bought a 17 year old euro and wondering why? Cover your losses and sell ASAP

      • +2

        This is my daughters partner, not me…and at 26 I don’t imagine he had our wiseness.

        I have no idea why he purchased it.

        • -1

          Yep sell it pronto BMW's at that age are nothing but problems sooner he gets out the better

        • +6

          BMW at 26 ? I don't think the BMW is going to be his only problem. Please tell your daughter about pregnancy prevention.

        • +3

          I would hope at age 26, he would know better

      • No, they paid $9k for a 17 year old BMW…. 😳

    • +20

      purchased a second hand 2004 BMW

      Why?

      • +14

        A 17 year old (euro) car and expect to run without problems… (facepalm)

        purchased a second hand 2004 BMW
        Why?

        Inspired by the OP with an out of warranty TV because it cost a lot of $$$… therefore it shouldn't breakdown.

        • +3

          There's buying a glass hammer here
          .
          .
          Buying a 17 yr old BMW here
          .
          .
          .
          .
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          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          .
          That guy with he Samsung TV is in the reasonable space here with the rest of the fair trading complaints

      • +6

        https://www.canstar.com.au/car-insurance/lemon-laws/
        In most areas, these used-car statutory warranties provide coverage for defective vehicles sold by a licensed dealer. These warranties may be excluded in certain circumstances, such as if the car is more than ten years old or has travelled more than 160,000 km.

        Purchased a Lemon - 2004 BMW

        Only if we were in 2004… not 2021

        • I think in QLD now all cars sold at a dealer has to come with at least 1 month warranty or 1000kms.

      • +18

        To look baller in a 4 cylinder 1 series.

      • -2

        Thanks for your helpful comment.

      • Clout.

        Same reason why most people buy an old Euro.

        Unless theyre an enthusiast who can fix it themselves or are dumping the engine for a better one.

    • -30

      Rubbish there is nothing wrong with doing that but like with any used car doing your homework is important.

      Yes, euros can be expensive and have a bad reputation but they could have bought a shitty Toyota with similar issues easily.

      • Did they do their research about that era and what issues to look for? 4 cylinders from then weren’t the best. If it is a 325i or 330i that is a different story but is not the point of this thread. Mind you $9000 is pricey for even the top of the line one from that era.

      • Did they get an independent mechanical inspection done when purchasing the car.

      It’s great they got a warranty but this problem is not unique to BMWs. Any used car is normally sold “as is”. Some from dealers do offer a warranty and sometimes statutory warranty will help but getting a inspection should be done regardless. The idea that you’re going to be better off buying a Japanese car without doing any checks or anything is bullshit. They are cheaper to maintain but you can just as easily get a lemon.

      Sounds like the dealer is being helpful and are covering the issues. I would suggest they get a mechanical inspection done to see if anything else needs sorting.

      What exact model did they buy?

      • +2

        It's about probability/likelihood of an issue occuring.

      • +35

        Lemme break down (pun intended) a few things here…

        euros can be are expensive

        FTFY

        have a bad reputation

        For obvious reasons

        they could have bought a shitty Toyota with similar issues easily.

        Highly unlikely. That is why there are 750,000km+ Camrys used as taxis and not 3 series BMW's. And even if it was a shitty Toyota, it would be a 1/4 of the price to repair and almost anyone could do it. Asian and especially Japanese culture is to build something that is good as it is a reflection of self, and building shit cars would cause immense embarrassment. Germans don't give a (fropanity) about feelings, just look at how Toyota treat customers compared to how Mercedes Benz treats their customers. Very different customer outlooks.

        but this problem is not unique to BMWs.

        Nah, it isnt "unique", but a lot more BMW's suffer from issues compared to a $9,000 Hyundai/Toyota/Kia/Mazda/Honda/you get the point…

        The idea that you’re going to be better off buying a Japanese car without doing any checks or anything is bullshit.

        No one is suggesting that (if they are, they are an idiot), but I would sooner buy a sight unseen $9,000 Japanese car over a Euro.

        but you can just as easily get a lemon (Japanese car).

        Yeah, nah. It's much easier to get a lemon when you are buying Euro Scheissewagens. Again, it goes back to cultural beliefs. The Japanese have a reputation as being reliable and that's because they care about making a car of lasting quality. It's about their pride. Germans, Italians and French don't care, hence it's easier to buy a lemon Euro, because they are poorly engineered, made out of garbage with little care for longevity because "(fropanity) customers".

        What exact model did they buy?

        Irrelevant. All 17yo BMW's are expensive, unreliable shit heaps.

        • +24

          It's not really about pride or nationality. It's not that japanese workers are inherently more concerned with quality. But the japanese, in particular Toyota, developed some amazingly efficient manufacturing processes that prized quality and emphasised continuous improvement.

          Just one example, is that if anyone on a Toyota production line spotted a defect they were empowered to halt the production line and then the entire production line would stop and an audit in the fault would be conducted. This compares to euro and US practices which focus on rectification after a car is built.

          Don't forget that there were terrible quality japanese cars. And Korean cars. There are also japanese factories, overseas, that implement these production methods that are staffed by non-japanese workers that make excellent cars.

          This is well worth a read if you're interested. It's a bit dated now but it's a engrossing story of the development of car mass manufacturing and car production from Henry Ford up to the late eighties, where the Japanese hit the ball out of the park in terms of quality and value.

          https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/93903.Machine_That_Chang...

          • +2

            @huggsymersh: I would add that most base spec BMWs aren't even made in Europe

            It costs the same to maintain a 318i and a 335, only one is a sportscar

          • +3

            @huggsymersh: They developed those processes because they are proud and won't compromise on quality. Just like they built the best TV's, best Stereo systems, best just about everything that people could actually afford

            • +4

              @Jackson: I guess I'm reluctant to attribute it primarily to a cultural tendency to pride of workmanship because in my mind it diminishes the hard work, ingenuity and innovation of a few key individuals in Toyota that developed their manufacturing systems (which were in turn inspired by the innovations of Ford).

              But no doubt, there's definitely a concept of honour (for better, and for worse!) and pride of workmanship in japanese culture.

              But while Toyota were excelling, I think it was Datsun and Mitsubishi that were struggling with quality control equal to US and Euro car makers. I think Honda also were pretty poor. So their pride didn't help them so much in those examples. I'm not actually much of a car person, so I could be wrong on these examples, just interested in manufacturing history! But the existence of japanese lemons emphasises the brilliance of Toyota quality control, efficiencies + value.

              Also, I'm pretty sure it's in the book, but when Hyundai first entered car manufacturing they bought the tooling from old japanese factories, priced them low to capture market share, but didn't invest in decent processes. Which is why their first generations of cars were so poor. They caught up eventually tho.

              I don't have a car. But after reading that book I linked too I started looking for excuses to go by a Toyota! But I don't need a car. I'll just have to sit back and enjoy listening to my 1981 Yamaha NS 690III speakers which still are amazing! So yes, big fan of the golden era of Japanese electronics and manufacturing here.

          • @huggsymersh: Six Sigma.

        • I wish I could upvote this comment multiple times, there's nothing else to add

        • Asian cars are still foreign anyway. Both euro and asian import cars are always going to be more expensive to run and maintain than locally produced cars. I don't know what cars are made locally anymore but there must be atleast one :) Seek and ye shall find!

          • +5

            @DisabledUser95808: We have a free trade agreement with Japan. Japanese cars are cheaper here than anywhere else,

            In the UK a Volkswagen Polo is £17,500, a Toyota corolla is £25,500

            In Australian the polo is 15k vs Corolla for 19,500. That's 12% cheaper than UK pricing.

            You are paying more and getting less by buying anything else - and lets not pretend Australian made cars were ever built better than Euros, they were just cheaper to fix when they did fail

            • -3

              @Shacktool: Local is always going to be superior to foreign. I still see plenty of locally produced old holdens and toyotas on the road. I don't see many old euro imports though sorry to say.

              • @DisabledUser95808: Toyota is foreign, most of them.

                Of course there are plenty of Holdens on the road, it was the best selling car in the country for decades. The reliability of a holden is about the same as BMW, but less people bought a BMW in the first place because they have always been terrible value in Aus.

            • @Shacktool: Even though your point holds, your numbers are a bit off. A base model Polo with manual gearbox is $21,490 D/A in NSW. A base model manual Corolla is $27,278 D/A in NSW. Prices have risen massively over the past couple of years.

          • @DisabledUser95808:

            I don't know what cars are made locally anymore

            Very short answer to this query, <1. (Apart from kit cars, and a few very low volume niche cars)

            Seek and ye shall find

            Only if you want an older car, not new.

        • @pegaxs

          Again, it goes back to cultural beliefs. The Japanese have a reputation as being reliable and that's because they care about making a car of lasting quality. It's about their pride. Germans, Italians and French don't care

          If you're quite finished indulging in your Weebophilia (quite ironic, considering you were bemoaning people for preferring Japanese cars over Chinese Haval sh*tboxes), you might want to take a moment to realise that Germany invented the automobile before Japan was even an industrial nation.

          Before Japan was known for anything internationally other than their insular, isolated feudal-age society that revolved around tribal warfare, Germany was a world leader in almost all scientific and industrial fields, not to mention renowned globally for their obsessive work ethic and ridiculously high standards of quality and craftsmanship (especially in blade-smithing, watchmaking, optics, engineering, metallurgy, firearms, construction/architecture and chemistry).

          German inventions that quite literally changed the world could fill a book. Just to name a few:

          • Printing presses
          • Nuclear fission
          • Telephones
          • First fully electromechanical & programmable computer
          • Jet engines
          • Helicopters
          • First true CRT television
          • First TV broadcasts
          • Modern refrigerators
          • First man-made object in outer space
          • First pocket camera
          • Airbags
          • Colour scanners
          • Painkillers
          • Bacteriology
          • Record players/magnetic tapes
          • Integrated chip cards
          • Contraceptive pill
          • Bicycles
          • Contact lenses
          • Grand piano
          • Electric trolley cars
          • Toothpaste

          And the majority of them happened before Japan even had any kind of heavy industry, let alone was known for making quality cars.

          But yeah sure, Germany doesn't care about quality and doesn't have a reputation for being reliable, lol. It just innovated most of the 20th century as we know it, single-handedly.

          Final fun fact for the day: Prussian military generals and officers were largely responsible for turning feudal Japan's ragtag military forces into the military behemoth that conquered so much of East Asia after WW1.

          Asian and especially Japanese culture is to build something that is good as it is a reflection of self, and building shit cars would cause immense embarrassment.

          I guess Takata didn't get that memo before they caused the largest automotive recall in history? (And killed 32 people/injured over 350 globally)

          • -1

            @Gnostikos: German inventions were generations ago though, and industrial manufacturing can go 180 very quickly. Don't think there's good link between the inventor and current-day.
            The ancient middle-east/ Arab Golden Age made significant contributions to mathematics, science and medicine for example, but now they're not known for much in STEM in modern day.

            • -1

              @Blitzfx:

              German inventions were generations ago though

              Lol, you mean either one generation ago or within the current generation?

              A side-by-side comparison of German inventions and Japanese inventions is no comparison.

              One nation is a technological innovator, the other is a technological incubator.

              One nation innovated in fields and disciplines that never-before existed, the other built upon existing scientific/technological achievements.

              That tends to be the case when one of those nations (Japan) only left the feudal era at around the beginning of the 20th century.

              Don't think there's good link between the inventor and current-day.

              Lol… yes Germany is only the largest economy in Europe, 4th largest economy globally, 3rd largest exporter of goods globally, 4th globally in number of patent applications per GDP and 53 of the world's Fortune 500 companies are German.

              There's definitely no continuing tradition of absolutely unmatched work ethic, obsessive pursuit of high standards of quality and incredibly strong industrial output continuing into the modern day /s.

              Literally most of the technology you can find in your house today has a German forefather somewhere in its lineage.

              • @Gnostikos:

                Lol, you mean either one generation ago or within the current generation?

                lol you gonna be semantic now

                Printing presses
                Painkillers

                I'm not disputing German work ethic, but infinite factors play into a nations economy and is no indicator for it's work ethic. There's no reputable scientific journal / papers linking the two, or everything else you listed.

                Feel free to keep the strawman about me implying Germans have no work ethic though.

                • @Blitzfx:

                  lol you gonna be semantic now

                  You're attempting to portray all German innovations as ancient history. The jet engine was developed 84 years ago by Hans von Ohain. Nuclear fission was discovered 83 years ago by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman. The Zuse Z3 was completed 80 years ago by Konrad Zuse.

                  These are moments of history within living memory.

                  We still use all of foundational theory of those discoveries to this day. Nuclear fission still happens in precisely the same manner that Otto Hahn described in 1938. Modern jet engines are still fundamentally identical in principle and function to the one Hans von Ohain created in 1937.

                  They're still innovating to this day.

                  You ever been to a mine site in Australia? Guess what drives one of the lifeblood industries of this nation?
                  German corporations like BASF, Bosch, Liebherr, Siemens AG, ThyssenKrupp, Rheinmetall AG, Schaeffler, Zeiss, Winder Controls, etc.
                  These companies continually fly in staff to remote mine sites across Australia because there are no qualified personnel in this country who can maintain, service and effectively operate some incredibly complicated mining heavy machinery and processing equipment.

                  How about the health industry? Bayer, Merck & Boehringer Ingelheim are some of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world. Without Bayer's contributions to the field of modern medicine and pharmaceuticals, millions of people wouldn't be alive (the first anti-biotics).

                  I won't bother touching upon the automotive industry, because German achievements in that field should be fairly self-evident (i.e. inventing the entire industry in the first place) but the Volkswagen Group overtook Toyota as the world's largest car manufacturer in 2016.

                  Why do people like the OP obsess over having a German badge on their car if German-made cars are supposedly good-for-nothing these days? Why is "Made in Germany" the most coveted country of origin label for white goods, electronics and other household appliances? As they say, all stereotypes are based on some truths.

                  but infinite factors play into a nations economy and is no indicator for it's work ethic. There's no reputable scientific journal / papers linking the two, or everything else you listed.

                  So what exactly is your arbiter and burden of proof for why Germany supposedly isn't innovating anymore, but Japan is? Nintendo and anime?

                  I would say remaining a dominant world power in key scientific and technological industries for a century now, along with being one of the foundational members of the Western world and one of the wealthiest, most productive nations in the world, are all pretty good indicators for why a nation is to be regarded as having a consistently strong work ethic and high standards of quality in their work but according to you and Pegaxs, a crappy example of a 2004 BMW is enough to sway you that the Germans are a bunch of unreliable bums who're resting on their laurels, lol.

                  • -1

                    @Gnostikos:

                    You're attempting to portray all German innovations as ancient history. The jet engine was developed 84 years ago by Hans von Ohain. Nuclear fission was discovered 83 years ago by Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassman. The Zuse Z3 was completed 80 years ago by Konrad Zuse.
                    These are moments of history within living memory.

                    Did you just conveniently omit the other half of what I said? Generations-ago isn't ancient history. That isn't before 900AD.

                    I can play purist and say everything is derived from maths -> physics / eng-> chemistry -> medcine, to undermine your argument that Germans aren't even technological innovators. They incubated abstract concepts of numbers and applied that understanding into physics.

                    So what exactly is your arbiter and burden of proof for why Germany supposedly isn't innovating anymore, but Japan is? Nintendo and anime?

                    Because I don't have one, and yet to see one, I don't insinuate outlandish claims that there is a direct causation between an arbitrary list of inventions and continued innovation into modern day.
                    That would be a life-time career of research. But here you are just making up metrics and indicators, with infinite exceptions, undefined impact of said indicators, why it even matters compared to what other nations have discovered, just to list a few questions academics will surely ask.

                    It's very clear to me you just want to straw man your way to the moon. No where did I suggest or claim that Germany is NOT innovating.

                    but according to you and Pegaxs, a crappy example of a 2004 BMW is enough to sway you that the Germans are a bunch of unreliable bums who're resting on their laurels, lol.

                    Yeah totally. You're right. Perfect reading and comprehension. /s

                    Not gonna keep writing essays to counter your every single deliberate attempts to fabricate hyperbole and claims that which isn't there

                    unreliable bums

                    *Citation needed.

                    • -1

                      @Blitzfx:

                      Did you just conveniently omit the other half of what I said?

                      You mean the other sentence you wrote?

                      You compared German innovations to the Islamic Golden Age polymaths from 700 to 1,300 years ago; implying both were relics of long-lost history when most of the German innovations I listed happened from the 1900s onwards.

                      Your comparison was invalid. Stop backtracking your words. It's clear you had no idea most of those German innovations occurred so recently because you and Pegaxs are too caught up in your hysteria and haven't read a history book.

                      I can play purist and say everything is derived from maths -> physics / eng-> chemistry -> medcine, to undermine your argument that Germans aren't even technological innovators. They incubated abstract concepts of numbers and applied that understanding into physics.

                      I don't think we've discovered an ancient Babylonian jet engine have we?

                      There's a fine line between standing on the shoulders of great thinkers and inventing an entirely new "wheel".

                      Because I don't have one, and yet to see one, I don't insinuate outlandish claims that there is a direct causation between an arbitrary list of inventions and continued innovation into modern day.

                      Right, so you have no argument, but you know I'm wrong yet you can't prove why?

                      I'm overwhelmed by your genius logic.

                      That would be a life-time career of research.

                      Lol… for the feeble-minded with incredibly biased and ignorant viewpoints.

                      Yes it takes much life-long study to determine that Somalia is one of the poorest, most technologically-backwards and least innovative countries on the planet; just like it does to figure out that Great Britain, Germany and the United States have contributed more significant scientific and technological innovations than any other nations in the last few hundred years.

                      You're one of those people that needs a peer-reviewed journal citation for the sky being blue, aren't you?

                      But here you are just making up metrics and indicators,

                      Yes, I "made up" the fact that Germany is the largest economy in Europe, 4th largest economy globally, 3rd largest exporter of goods globally, 4th globally in number of patent applications per GDP and 53 of the world's Fortune 500 companies are German.

                      I also "made up" all of those German corporations who are industry and market leaders in their respective fields and pioneering various scientific and technological disciplines.

                      And I definitely "made up" the list of German inventions that changed the world.

                      What low-effort argumentation from you. Are you just substituting posting on OzBargain as an outlet for social interaction or do you actually have anything worthwhile to say?

                      with infinite exceptions, undefined impact of said indicators, why it even matters compared to what other nations have discovered,

                      Because Germany was the first to discover all of those things I listed, without which modern civilization would not resemble what it is today. Not other nations and not Japan.

                      You do realise they don't give out Nobel Prizes for "Attempted Physics"? Or were you always accustomed to getting participation trophies in your youth?

                      It's very clear to me you just want to straw man your way to the moon. No where did I suggest or claim that Germany is NOT innovating.

                      Thanks for conceding defeat. Don't let the door hit you on your way out.

                      • -1

                        @Gnostikos:

                        You compared German innovations to the Islamic Golden Age polymaths from 700 to 1,300 years ago; implying both were relics of long-lost history when most of the German innovations I listed happened from the 1900s onwards.

                        Your comparison was invalid.

                        That's not what I'm implying and it's literally not invalid. It's derivation upon derivation upon derivation of the works. It's like your tiny head cannot wrap around the concept, and you continuing to make the claim that x-nation's invention at x-date is an indicator of work ethic.

                        Right, so you have no argument, but you know I'm wrong yet you can't prove why?

                        That's like claiming god physically exists and asking me to disprove it, the premise of which is objectively wrong to begin with lmfao.

                        Lol… for the feeble-minded with incredibly biased and ignorant viewpoints.

                        That's incredible you can call tens of thousands of professors and academics across these related-fields feeble-minded. Empty vessels make the most noise absolutely applies to you

                        You're one of those people that needs a peer-reviewed journal citation for the sky being blue, aren't you?

                        lol, continue to show your ignorance. "it's so obvious (in my shitty opinion), so it must be true"

                        Yes, I "made up" the fact that Germany is the largest econ

                        Strawman reaching pluto now.

                        a dominant world power in key scientific and technological industries for a century now
                        one of the foundational members of the Western world
                        one of the wealthiest, most productive nations in the world, are all pretty good indicators

                        These are your unsubtantiated indicators and metrics I am referring to, with no descriptors, arguments as for why they should be treated as such etc. Can you read? Apparently not.

                        What low-effort argumentation from you. Are you just substituting posting on OzBargain as an outlet for social interaction or do you actually have anything worthwhile to say?

                        My worthwhile thing to say is you pulling shit out of your ass and you suggesting I disprove you as a form of counter when you've shown nothing. Exactly the low-level logic of the god doesn't exist example.

                        If it wasn't obvious enough, it doesn't matter what Germany did and when, it doesn't matter what Japan did / didn't do and when, it doesn't matter about your fixation on BMW and pegasx.The only thing that matters is your shit x-nation + x-past-inventions + x-past-date = good correlation into modern day

                        but according to you and Pegaxs, a crappy example of a 2004 BMW is enough to sway you that the Germans are a bunch of unreliable bums who're resting on their laurels, lol.

                        Ignoring this? How about something easy like 1+1 and prove where I explicitly said this.

      • You start by saying "Rubbish there is nothing wrong with doing that" but then the entire rest of your post explains why there is in fact quite a lot wrong with doing that.

      • +3

        Never seen a shitty Toyota do this, not once

      • +2

        Mate, I own euros, but I can work on them myself. If you buy a 2004 BMW and expect trouble free motoring, you are either an idiot or ignorant.

        I'd you know you are going to have issues, and can do the work yourself, go for your life.

      • -2

        Oh the gullible lot. Shitty Toyota's because they are engineered better, last longer, costs much less to repair and service during their lifetime, honest to goodness mechanical engineering vs electronic shortcut doodads. BMW's are terribly engineered cars, its not super hard to make an engine deliver a gazillion horsepower but its harder to make it do that reliably. If there is any shit which should be flushed, it is BMW here.

      • Thank you, you at least are trying to be helpful 🙏
        He had bought it just before my daughter met him, I have no idea why.
        It’s certainly not something she would have done.
        I don’t know the model, but I’m thinking he clearly didn’t think a mechanical check was warranted buying from a car yard 🤷‍♀️

        • I remember sending one of those car inspectors to a car yard while I inspected another car - private sale (same day).
          He told me it was leaking oil in 3 places 0_o

          I went with the private sale.

        • It isn't unreasonable to assume a used car from a yard is trouble free when you buy it, that's why the dealer must give a statutory 3 months warranty. If the son in law bought warranty cover, it would start after the 3 months

          It would be worth paying for an independent inspection (ask for a pre inspection) at an independent BMW specialist, then take the report and get all issues fixed under warranty.

          If you have proof there was preexisting issues, ask for your costs refunded at small claims - after the car is fixed. Can't claim compensation for waste of time though

          • +4

            @Shacktool: 3 month statutory warranty doesn’t apply to vehicles older than 10 years, or, with 160000+ KM.

      • out of every other manufacturers out there you chose toyota? really?

      • Ok.

        I am buying a used car.

        Is it Euro?

        Yes—- Do NOT buy.

        No—Next step

    • +8

      lol didn't even need to read past the title. Shouldve done the research beforehand. There's no such thing as a 2004 BMW that isn't a lemon

    • +8

      Let's lock this in "there is nothing more expensive than a cheap BMW"

      I think there's needs to be a hit song with those lyrics.

      • +1

        They shoulda phoned a friend

  • +25

    Apparently They admitted in email that there were issues with the car when it was sold.

    Buying a cheap Euro is illogical, buying one with disclosed issues is another. Sorry, but this is entirely self-inflicted.

    • +10

      My interpretation is that the issues were disclosed after it had been sold.

      But I agree, this seems self-inflicted as anyone looking for a reliable car wouldn't buy a 2004 BMW from a car yard… Maybe the first 3 months were worth it?

      • +3

        Exactly our thoughts but that’s what he did and so now paying the consequences.
        A helpful solution is what I’m after for him.
        He can’t very well sell a lemon to some poor soul can he.

        • +2

          It's not a lemon. Its been driven for 17 years.

        • -1

          Yes he can it's up to the buyer to do his research. You can't expect a 17 yr old car not to have problems

  • +21

    If you don't have the money, don't buy a BMW. Go a cheap as shit Corolla or something.

    • I think the general advice is if you don't have a lot to spend you are very off buying a quality cheap item than a cheap luxury item. A 9000 Kia is going to be a world better than a 9000 BMW.

  • +5

    a second hand BMW

    There's threads here and all over the Internet about the perils encountered when buying an older second hand Euro.

    Doubt if you'll get any sympathy.

    • +4

      It’s not me, it’s my daughters 26 year old partner and it’s not sympathy he’s after.

  • +15

    The thing is that this experience is common… I would say that it's widely known that secondhand BMW's, Mercs and most euro cars are dodgy and faulty after 100,000kms. I don't even know that much about cars but this I know.

    • +1

      Agreed. European cars are overrated

    • +1

      I had a 2001 Merc C320 from new once. It had its first electrical issue after 3 and a bit years, but only 23000 km on the clock!!! Sold it with 70000km on the clock when things started to fail one after another, severe oil leaks, electrical gremlins with the lighting and boot opening issues. Never again…

      • it's really like they're engineered to fail, it's a disgrace they keep exploiting people that know nothing about cars

  • +33

    My daughters partner purchased a second hand BMW..

    So was your daughter impressed when he rocked up in a BMW? 😁

    • +3

      Nailed it! 🔨

    • This car looks good outside, but the inside it really hurts you.

  • +23

    BMW

    2004

    You don't need a crystal ball to predict the problems with this one

  • +11

    2004 BMW. At a guess, a 4 cylinder? Known for oil leaks and being generally crap. You likely have no recourse, and I'm honestly surprised that they have repaired what they did. Sell it and buy a lancer or corolla.

    • +4

      at that price, he could have bought a CJ lancer

    • Sell it to who ?

      • Someone who will buy it? I buy vehicles with issues like this, though not something this old. Failing that, and the easiest option, is to send it to an auction house like pickles, Manheim etc.

  • +23

    Get rid of the BMW, then get rid of the partner. Best early learning lesson in life

  • +5

    purchased a second hand 2004 BMW

    Now that was the mistake - right there

  • +35

    Reminds of this 'story' from The Betoota Advocate - 19-Year-Old Thinks He Got The Deal Of The Century After Buying A 1994 BMW 318i For $800

    BMW = Bavarian Money Waster.

    • +3

      That is a deal, I sold a 20 year old 318i, with hail damage, for $1400…

      • Oh dear…

  • +22

    Bought old euro
    Didn't get a 3rd party inspection
    Bought dodgy extended warranty

    Strike 3.

  • +4

    I have to re-post this guy's lemon video

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5sVmoOZRypk

  • +16

    Even ignoring the fact it is a BMW, the car is 17 years old. It is almost certain to have some problems.
    Who pays $9k for a 17y.o. car?

    • But..But…It's a BMW - Freude am Fahren (When not on a tow truck…)

    • Some BMWs are very, very expensive new.

      • Expensive, sure. But there is still a lifespan for a mechanical vehicle that is probably less than 17 years.
        There must be a tipping point when the original purchase price of a vehicle is no longer relevant.

      • +6

        Yes they are expensive to buy brand new but the moment they are out of warranty depreciation will hit really hard and as a result you can buy 10+ yo Euros for a fraction of their original price. Reason being the expensive maintenance and repair costs so not many buyers would want to touch an old Beamer unless you are able to do DIY.

        Just look at the depreciation curves for a BMW X5 and a Toyota Rav4 which are two popular cars in the same category (Note these are US stats but can't be any different here in AUS and also I would have compared with a Kluger but unable to find any depreciation info with a quick google)

        https://www.autopadre.com/depreciation-curves/bmw-x5
        https://www.autopadre.com/depreciation-curves/toyota-rav4

        Can't say much without knowing the model but I got a feeling $9k is a bit too much to pay for a 17 yo car.

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