Discussion about The Quality and The Price of The Cordless Tools Specially Ozito VS Ryobi

Hi Ozbargains,
I need to buy some cordless tools for DIY projects around the house. Appreciate if you can share your experience with me and others to see which one is the better brand (Ozito or Ryobi or etc), specially I'm looking for the 5 or 3-pieces kit such as:

https://www.bunnings.com.au/makita-18v-3-piece-brushless-cor...
https://www.bunnings.com.au/ryobi-18v-one-2-5ah-4-piece-kit_...
This is my favourite, and I don't know how I missed it: https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/610528

Thanks in advance,

Comments

  •  

    much of the same, although i think ryobi has more tools.

  • +6 votes

    Ozito PXC range is up to the task for any general home DIY project. Much cheaper than Ryobi. If you need something more powerful for the odd tool, the Ozito corded electric range which are cheap will out perform any Ryobi battery tool. The range of tools is a consideration but I think ozito pxc range has pretty much the main things covered.

    If you need an example, I was able to cut 90x90 hardwood posts with the Ozito pxc circular saw no problems with the 2.5ah battery.

  • +1 vote

    Ozito is the cheapest and “best-buy” IMO. 5 year warranty, easy to go through warranty through them, have had 2 tools replaced by them on the spot so far including a polesaw and something else I can’t remember right now. And the batteries actually go on sale a couple times a year so you can get high amp batteries for a decent price. All the tools I have by them which is about 10 now work perfectly well and have no complaints apart from that build quality seems very plastic-y but all other tools I’ve seen that are wireless at the shop seem pretty much the same. The more expensive ones have nicer finishes.
    Edit: not too happy with the nail/staple gun hybrid, it isn’t really powerful enough for much at all.

  •  

    My experience with Ozito brushless has been great for many-many DIY jobs at home. Before I bought anything, I really wanted to get Ryobi tools but I just couldn’t justify the price for my requirements. I didn’t feel like I was getting a whole lot more compared to Ozito for the extra dollars.

  •  

    I agree with happyadventurer and most of you guys, I have already few corded Ozito tools and there are fine for all my tasks but I'm getting tired of running 30Meters power cable all around the area I'm working.

  •  

    My experience with most Ozito tools has been very good. (Except the mitre saw).

    •  

      Mind me asking what the issue either the mitre saw was?

      •  

        At a guess when you are using a mitre saw you need precision so everything lines up without gaps. All the Ozito stuff I have used including the circular saw are good enough for most jobs but I wouldn't even attempt to use them for joinery, allthough it could be a problem with the operator.

  • +1 vote

    I’m in the Milwaukee, Ego, Ryobi and Ozito PCX ecosystems. To be honest Ozito does seem for home care and DIY. Their tools are significantly cheaper and the 5 year replace on the spot warranty is fantastic.
    Ryobi is a step up in quality and power, just depends on your budget and need.
    The only Ozito tool i wasn’t a fan of was the hot glue gun. I returned it and purchased the Ryobi glue gun and it’s a lot better, but it’s also double the price.
    Don’t forget that the Ozito PCX 18v line (red and black) is rebadged Einhell whereas the 240v grey Ozito products aren’t.

  •  

    I think Ryobi generally has better build quality/more powerful tools if you are prepared to spend a bit more. They offer more brushless tools in their range than Ozito so should have more grunt and last longer.
    For example their higher impact driver is rated at 270Nm where Ozito tops out at 180Nm. Which may seem high for an impact driver but it's the same with the impact wrenches, 270Nm for the brushless Ryobi, 215Nm for the Ozito where you might need that extra grunt.

    On the other hand, Ozito has the upper hand in the rotary drill department where they offer one with 1.2J and another with 2.2J vs just the smaller 1.3J for Ryobi.

    Ozito's will come on sale more often as they price match ALDI. Not many of the Ryobi products are comparable so don't usually drop in price much unless they're being superseded.

    Either will be fine for most DIY and if you have any issues in that sort of environment, you can quickly and easily swap them over at Bunnings. If they fail after the warranty period, I think for the price you pay, you should have well and truly gotten your money's worth in that time.

    I use a Bosch hammer drill and impact driver as they see the most work out of all my tools and Ryobi for pretty much everything else these days. I do have some DeWalt stuff but it's getting on in age now.

  •  

    I've had some Ozito corded and many similar "no name" tools from various sources over the years. If you need a tool for a one off job they can be the way to go but if you see a tool as an investment and intend to use it semi regularly or more, it's worth taking a step up and IMO Ryobi are definitely a step up. Ryobi also have far more tools in their line up and longer warranty.

    •  

      Ryobi has a 4 yr warranty vs 5yr Ozito… not sure about longer warranty

      • +1 vote

        Most of the Ryobi 1+ come with an additional 2 years if you register it online, so 6 years in total.

        • -1 vote

          Oh right, sorry, missed that bit about the extra on the site.

          Ozito is still 5 years if you just want to keep/scan the receipt and not hassle around with the registration though.

  •  

    Have quite a bit of ozito 18v stuff, a variety of batteries, drill, impact driver, recip saw. for most home situations they work well. Just make sure you get good bits to go with them - a good philips head driver, drill bits, recip saw blades etc - those make the job easier and safer usually.

  • +3 votes

    I've given up on Cordless.. As I see it if you rarely use them the batteries die or stop holding full charge…
    As you shouldnt leave them on charge endlessly, so unless you dig them out monthly and charge em, I've found for me Im better off with corded. Screw pissing around with warranty etc.. I'd like it to work when I need it, not when you wait weeks for a warranty claim

    YMMV

    •  

      You sure that's nit the old chunky ni-cad system? Some of my batteries are easily 5 year old and non has given me the trouble, even the 36v mower that go hibernate for 6 months in winter but still managed to do the half the lawn when i took it out for spring clean.

    •  

      This ↑. I bought a Li-ion rechargeable Ryobi multi-tool. Battery dies after 3 years of infrequent use. Replaced with a corded Ozito multi-tool. Still reliable after 10 years of infrequent use. YMMV.

    •  

      If you use reasonably often it’s worth going cordless for convenience of no cords.

      I have ryobi lithium batteries over 6yo still going strong. I probably use them fortnightly on average though. Have two not holding gages anymore, but they’ve had a pretty hard life.

    •  

      That's because manufactures promote convenience and capacity over correct storage.

      Li-ions are best stored long term 3/4 full give or take. I only use my tools pretty sporadically and use the same battery in each (by coincidence thanks to deals, they are all different brands) until it basically goes flat, then I charge it back to full. If my task isn't done there's plenty of run time left in the spares sitting 3/4 full.

  • +1 vote

    If you're someone who loves a bargain the Ozito Power X Change range is fantastic with the price matching mentioned here already - I have a saved search here on ozbargain for ozito so hear whenever one of the range is on a huge saving. I've been gradually building up my kit over the last couple of years that way grabbing tools on my wish list as they're discounted - it's been quite rewarding :-)

    Every tool I've bought from the range has been great, especially the brushless impact and drill drivers. The garden vac/blower, edge trimmer and extension pole chainsaw have also been fantastic.

    Nothing has failed me so far at all, though countless reports here say that if/when one does you walk into bunnings with the receipt and basically just walk stright back out with the replacement, hassle free. It's worth scanning the receipts and putting them all in a folder though, not many store receipts are still readable after a few years.

    I've got 2 x 4ah, 1 x 3ah, 2 x 1.2ah batteries, they all still seem to work perfectly with the tools getting occasional use around the home. One fast charger and two slow chargers have done me just fine, pretty easy to keep things topped up.

    •  

      I just SMS the receipt at Bunnings and store a digital copy straight away

  •  

    Thanks to many years of having Ozito as a notification term every time something is posted, I now have many power tools in the PXC range!! Collection includes multiple drills and impact drivers including a rotary hammer drill, lawnmower, jet blower, angle grinder, chainsaw, multi-function tool, reciprocating saw, inflator/deflator, circular saw, jigsaw, grass trimmer, hedging shears and probably about 10 batteries (mostly 4Ah bought bought when on special for between $29 and $40). I'm well and truly impressed with the Ozito system. Always have a couple of batteries ready to go, and have returned a few things such as the jet blower and angle grinder with no worries. Batteries seem to be holding up really well too. Of course some products are better than others. The grass trimmer and non-brushless drills are pretty damn average, but all the brushless ones are fantastic and one of my favourites is the inflator/deflator for pumping up the kids bikes and any other tyres, including car tires (albeit slowly).

  •  

    It looks like most of the user are happier with Ozito product, I'll appreciate if you know any sales at the moment and are you trust to buy this devices online.

  •  

    Given you can usually get an Ozito PXC Starter Kit usually for around $250 which includes 2 batteries and 5 or 6 skins, I'd say there no question. Get the kit and see how you go. These kits are cheaper than 1 skin + 1 battery for a lot of Ryobi stuff.

  • +3 votes

    I’ve used Ozito, Aldi, Ryobi and Makita drills back to back. Ozito and Aldi seemed ok, Ryobi was more powerful and Makita more powerful again. The Ozito non-brushed circular saw was next to useless, the Ryobi ok and Makita great.

    I have Ryobi at home. Too many skins if I’m honest (15?), but nothing has let me down for a full renovation. I started with a drill and gradually built up over time as I needed tools mostly second hand. A couple of times I’ve bought ‘packs’ second hand and then Onsold spares. Ended up paying well under half RRP. It seems it’s popular enough that people buy it, but then upgrade to more quality tools when they can afford as well.

    My brother invested in Ozito and kinda regrets it. It does the job, but not as well. He does some fairly large jobs with it.

    Depends on your usage. Heavy, I’d invest a little more. Occasional or light use, Ozito will be fine.