Ikea Air Purifier

https://www.ikea.com/au/en/p/foernuftig-air-purifier-white-7...

Clean Air Delivery Rate (CADR) at highest/lowest fan speed: 120/25 m3/h (with both particle filter and gas filter installed).
Sound level at the highest/lowest fan speed: 60/28 dB (with both particle filter and gas filter installed).
Maximum wattage: 14 W (with both particle filter and gas filter installed).
Net weight: 3.05 kg (with both particle filter and gas filter installed).

Has anyone used this air purifier and have reviews?

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Comments

  •  

    No mention of hepa filter means it's not worth it.

    •  

      That's just the marketing copy, it has a HEPA filter: https://www.ikea.com/au/en/manuals/foernuftig-air-purifier__...

      Edit: looks like it's been tested to EPA12 as far as I can tell HEPA starts at HEPA13

      • +1 vote

        Most hepa filters I've seen, filter 99.95-99.97%.

        This filter 99.5%

        If they have written hepa, then I'd imagine it's of a different level as you've said.

        https://medifyair.com/blogs/blog-feed/medical-grade-hepa-tru...

      • +1 vote

        From the NY Times review IKEA Förnuftig Air Purifier: Cheap, Sleek—and Weak

        it isn’t a true-HEPA purifier, or a very powerful purifier, period. It’s designed to capture PM2.5—that is, particles 2.5 microns in diameter and above, in contrast to the 0.3-micron HEPA standard. That means it’s optimized for larger airborne particles such as pollen and mold spores, rather than for very fine particulates like wildfire smoke, as HEPA filters are.

    •  

      https://www.ikea.com/au/en/p/foernuftig-filter-for-particle-...

      Maybe just not paying for the hepa name tag? :)

      •  

        No, it doesn't filter fine enough.
        Taken from your link

        The particle filter is optimized to filter away approximately 99.5 percent of smaller airborne particles such as PM2.5 particles, dust and pollen.
        The particle filter is tested according to EN 1822-1 and ISO 29463-3 which corresponds to class EPA12.

        And from the standard

        To meet the HEPA standard, the filter must remove 99.97% or more of all particles which are 0.3 microns (micrometers) in diameter.

        •  

          It actually says

          The particle filter is optimized to filter away approximately 99.5 percent of smaller airborne particles such as PM2.5 particles, dust and pollen. PM2.5 are small inhalable particles, that measure 0.1-2.5 micrometres.

          So while it "only" filters 99.5% it does filter 0.1-2.5uM

          Also if you read the manual it actually references a "HEPA filter".

          •  

            @lunchbox99: Not sure what difference including the entire sentence has compared to just the part which proves it doesn't meet HEPA requirements.
            The particle size is too large, 0.3uM is the requirement.

            As per the comments above, it's a EPA 12 standard, which for an air purifier is pretty dismal but technically should not be called HEPA as it doesn't meet the requirements.

            •  

              @whitelie: So what? You seem to be implying that filtering 99.5% of 0.5uM and larger is of no benefit. I disagree. For the price, particularly of the replacement filters this represents excellent value for many people.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Air_filter#Filter_classes

              I mean by your logic why even define different filter classes. All filters below H13 are clearly doing nothing, right?