This was posted 5 years 2 months 17 days ago, and might be an out-dated deal.

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Daysoft Daily Disposable Contact Lenses $26.36 for 32 Pairs Delivered

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I've used these back in the UK and these are great lenses at a great price. One month supply (32 pairs) is $26.36. As far as I can tell, not many know about these here hence the post. The only downside is that it takes up to 14 business days for delivery to Australia.

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  • +1

    A few questions:

    What material are they made of?

    What is the Dk/t of the lenses?

    What is the modulus and total diameter?

    What treatments are in place to prevent lens dehydration?

    And so on…

    Would you risk changing to an unknown contact lens when there are possible ramifications to your vision? A contact lens lacking in oxygen permeability (exactly what this is) will lead to neovascularization of the cornea with regular wear. http://www.eagleeyeuk.com/corneal-neovascularization/

    Possible okay for once in a blue moon, but not an area worth saving a few dollars on!!!

    • -1

      The website has answers to all of those questions. Dk/t is comparable with other hydrogel daily disposable lenses, which is lower than those dk/t values seen in silicone hydrogels. However, I've read that Dk/t values have less impact on eye health with daily disposable hydrogels (do not confuse with weekly/monthly disposables) as dailies are worn only once, while other types of contact lenses have to go through multiple wears which possibly reduce oxygen transmission (http://www.eyedolatryblog.com/2013/01/advantages-of-daily-co... ). If someone has some literature on this, I would be glad to see it.

      Anyway, I am not an eye care professional, just wanted to let people know that there are cheaper alternatives to daily hydrogel lenses which might be worth considering.

      • Dk/t does not equal Dk which is the value given on the website. Dk/t varies significantly with the thickness of the lenses and the thickness will also vary depending on the prescription. The fact that there is no mention of the actual hydrogel material used, or the thickness of the lens means both are likely unsatisfactory.

        Oxygen permeability is extremely significant in all types of contact lens whether they be re-usable or daily disposable. What matters is how often the lenses are used, and for how long. And if a person were to use these lenses quite regularly they will develop neovascularisation.

        All lenses compared against are approximately 10-20 years old in terms of technology - ancient history in terms of medical/contact lens advancements.

        A 'blog' and two cherry picked studies out of hundreds (both of which from 2001) are not evidence these lenses are remotely suitable for anyone considering saving a few dollars.

        As mentioned below - changing contact lenses should be done in discussion with an eye care professional, not on a cost cutting whim.

    • Great site Buckster BTW, ta for that too.

  • The site has feature comparisons with competitor equivalent products. Isn't this an equivalent of Acuvue Oasis?

  • +1

    Answered my own question — they are gas permeable but they're hydrogel as opposed to silocone hydrogel (more exey material aparently).

    Fair call Buckster, think I'll stick with Accuvue.

    • -1

      Accuvue has both hydrogel and silicone hydrogel daily disposables. These are comparable to Accuvue hydrogels, while silicone hydrogels are different type of lenses with different benefits/downsides.

    • +1

      Your Acuvue Oasys lenses are 7x + more oxygen permeable than these lenses, and are designed in a manner to minimise the potential downsides the inclusion of silicone in the material can cause.

      Your lenses would be an E/C class Merc vs. these being a 1980s Bombadore.

  • +2

    My suggestion is to ask your optometrist what might be the best suggestion for your eyes and wearing habits. What's best for some may not be best for you.

    Silicon hydrogels are better for most people but are a harder (higher modulus) lens so might be too harsh for some corneal surfaces. Why not ask an expert? (And preferably an independent expert who can order from all suppliers, not just limited to a couple of "preferred" suppliers.)

    • -1

      That's good advice - you should definitely discuss this with an optometrist. Daily hydrogels might be superior for some contact lens wearers but clearly not everyone.

  • I've been a long time wearer of Focus Dailies and never had a problem. Gave both Daysoft Classic and Silk variants a try a couple of years ago and found them very uncomfortable and both varieties stung my eyes with the Silk being the worst.

    Decided to try the Classic again earlier this year in case they had changed the saline solution but no, still stung my eyes so I'm sticking with the Focus Dailies.

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