Protein Powder (Shakes) for 14 Year Old Gym Goer

Hi there. I'm a boy turning 15 in 3 months. Just started a gym program to build muscle and lose some body fat, as I'm chubby around the belly and chest. I'm 5'11", weigh 82kg. I would like some advice on what protein powder(s) I should purchase. I was thinking of buying one of these for post workout: Max's Super Whey or Muscletech Nitrotech * Ripped * from xtremewarehouse. My friend and I go to the gym 4 times a week.

This is what we do:

Monday: Tris and chest
Tuesday: Biceps and back
Thursday: Shoulders and traps
Saturday: Either Legs or Cardio (20m running/walking combo on treadmill and 10-15m bike)

I eat healthily and don't have sugary foods

Thanks in advance

I've got the answer I need. Thanks for all your help.

Xtreme Warehouse

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closed Comments

  • +65 votes

    My advice would be none.

    Simply eat healthy and not too much and keep going to the gym and the results will come.

    • +15 votes

      More protein is better.

      OP, branded bodybuilding supplements are a rip-off. The only ingredient in the branded protein supplements worth taking is the whey protein. So just buy some pure bulk whey protein.

      Bulk Nutrients and Venom Protein are reputable and offer good value.

      • +16 votes

        Whey Protein Isolate isn't worth the premium over Whey Protein Concentrate unless you're lactose intolerant and/or on a very strict low carbohydrate diet.

        So buy some WPC from Bulk Nutrients or Venom Protein.

        • +1 vote

          Thank you for all your comments. I'll be sure to use your advice

        • +3 votes

          @McYellowBird:

          Although protein is good, when you are starting out, and at the age you are and the fact that you already have some weight you want to lose, I'd start out for the first three months with none, change your diet up a bit to include healthy protein etc. A few reputable people I know have suggested that for a regular person looking to increase muscle mass and lose fat, you can get all the protein and energy you need from sticking to a good healthy diet that is tilted towards protein. Once you start looking you'll find there is a lot of it out there!

          Being 14 and eating healthy, persistent every second day at the gym pushing yourself, you'll be pretty big by 16. Then maybe from there you can see what you want to achieve body wise and consider supplements.

        • +5 votes

          @McYellowBird:

          Thank you for all your comments. I'll be sure to use your advice

          You can also learn from this thread, the importance of scrutinising advice you receive from strangers.

          Be wary of people who make claims without any reasoning to back them up. The internet is worse than the gym — where more than half the users don't know what they're doing, but some of them are still eager to provide unsolicited advice.

        • +4 votes

          @serpserpserp:

          Although protein is good,

          Protein is a macronutrient present in most foods. This thread is about protein powders which are almost ubiquitously based on WPC and/or WPI, with expensive crap added for marketing purposes in the case of branded supplements. Whey Protein no matter it's form, is essentially a milk fraction concentrated to provide a cheap and convenient source of dietary protein. It is a food, albeit a refined one, and is added to many processed foods. Unfortunately, Soy Protein in various forms (Soy Protein Isolate, Textured Vegetable Protein, etc [check the processed chicken products at Colesworth!]) is favoured as a protein boosting processed meat product additive since it's cheaper than Whey Protein but significantly inferior in bioavailability and amino acid profile.

          when you are starting out, and at the age you are and the fact that you already have some weight you want to lose,

          Neither experience nor age should preclude anyone from training and eating the best they can.

          Barely anyone should be concerned with losing "weight", only excess body fat. At 14 and for many years to come, OP will still be developing and shouldn't actively seek to lose body fat. He needs plenty of nutrition to continue developing. Any presently excess body fat will be attenuated as he grows taller and develops more muscle.

          I'd start out for the first three months with none, change your diet up a bit to include healthy protein etc.

          Whey Protein IS healthy protein!

          A few reputable people I know have suggested that for a regular person looking to increase muscle mass and lose fat, you can get all the protein and energy you need from sticking to a good healthy diet that is tilted towards protein.

          And a cheap and convenient way to achieve that is to add protein shakes to a standard healthy diet.

        •  

          @Scrooge McDuck:

          Yes, always scrutinize why people are so quick to advocate things purely based on their personal situation and not taking a step back and looking at the problem holistically.

        •  

          @Scrooge McDuck:

          No problems.

          Ohhh you edited your post!

  • +10 votes

    Don't take any.

    •  

      Mind explaining why?

      • +15 votes

        You are 14.

        Talk to your doctor to see if you should have it. I am betting they say no, but also that you won't go and ask them.

        • -23 votes

          My friend is 14 and is using protein.

        • +45 votes

          @McYellowBird: if your friend jumped off a cliff then would you?

        • -16 votes

          @altomic: Really stupid question. 3 of my friends use protein before workouts, but they're nowhere near as into the gym as the friend I'm talking about. They're all getting bigger. Nothing's bad happening to them. I've watched a physical therapist's (Jeff Cavaliere) video about supplements and what age to take them. here

        •  

          @McYellowBird:

          My friend is 14 and is using protein.

          Do his parents know he's on drugs!?

          /sarcasm

        • +8 votes

          Talk to your doctor to see if you should have it. I am betting they say no, but also that you won't go and ask them.

          Most GPs know SFA about bodybuilding or even nutrition. 🙄

        • +3 votes

          @McYellowBird: It was rhetoric. But seriously go swimming. Upper body forming. Cardio. I did 6 months solid of swimming- 2 or 3 times a week. An hour of straight laps. I was pumped. I combined that with road cycling the other days -25km rides. Had to cut it down as I went back to full time work.

        • +5 votes

          @altomic:dad? 🤔

        • +11 votes

          Taking protein powder for a 14 year old will be fine. Its just a food supplement although I would recommend including more protein in your diet rather than taking protein supplements if possible. Source - I been going to gym since i turned 14 and been taking protein powder sice then as well. Its been 20 years and have not had any adverse effects due to either of these activities.

        • +3 votes

          @Scrooge McDuck:

          Remember he is a kid and he isn't looking to body build. Everyone is so fast to jump on the protein shakes before they even get in the gym and have a regular routine, good eating etc. I think people should direct their attention and dollars in that direction first before protein supps.

        • +3 votes

          @lokesh7: this x20 ^^
          Protein is natural and comes from food. Bodybuilding tears your muscle slightly and your body uses the protein to heal in a bigger state. Because its hard to get enough protein from food alone you use the shakes as a supplement. For everyone giving thei uneducated 2c, keep the change.

        •  

          @serpserpserp:

          Remember he is a kid and he isn't looking to body build.

          O'rly?

          Let's read the OP:

          just started a gym program to build muscle and lose some body fat,

          That's bodybuilding!

        • +1 vote

          @lokesh7:

          ^ This. Whey isn't some toxic drug, its a diet supplement derived from milk. As long as you're eating quality foods to get all your other essential nutrients, you'll have no problems taking protein powder.

          Brands do matter if you're looking at getting the most protein per gram though. I remember there was a reddit post where someone took a dozen popular brands and analysed it at his work laboratory. The optimum nutrient brand was up there in terms of amount of protein/gram so thats what I've been using.

        • +1 vote

          @Xoenz: Yes I use Optimum Nutrition as well. Love the double rick flavor and I can find no reason to move to another brand

        • +1 vote

          @tee123:

          For everyone giving their uneducated 2c, keep the change.

          Or give it to me, I'll be rich!…

           

          *richer

        • +1 vote

          @Scrooge McDuck:
          GPs know a lot more about nutrition than they let on. They just don't feel a need to talk about it if there isn't a significant problem with it. They are doctors who are educated to solve problems, not dwell on a self important subject.

          OTOH, dietitians, nutritionist, etc. feel compelled to talk about nutrition because that's the extent of their training.

          Not going to be a popular opinion but ask a nutritionist to read blood charts in a anorexia ward.

        •  

          @Xoenz:
          Brands are only useful to eliminate dodgy products. Whey is produced in large dairy separation factories and the milk constituents are sold to companies like ON, or other OEMs to add their flavour and "proprietary" blends to it.

          Just quickly on proprietary blends - if the ingredient list is hidden, do not buy it nor support the product. It is an FDA loophole. Companies hide banned substances, or make misleading statements because the "proprietary" crap they are overcharging for is protected until the pending FDA review is released. An overwhelming majority of the time, they will be asked to remove the product from market, or correct their marketing statements, or their blend is exposed because it is against FDA rules that hide the ingredients. It's a long running ruse - ON, Animal, Gaspari and countless others have done it. bodybuilding.com has a long list of all supplements ever produced and you'll find a lot of discontinue products. The most notable offender is Animal Cut with so much ephedra in it that it caused dependency and cardiac damage.

          I recommend uncut weigh. You can buy them in 20-50kg bags and they work out approximately 1/3 the price of brands like ON. You can buy flavouring and just mix small batches at a time or use it unflavored. Honestly, all whey flavours tastes the same after a while.

  • +28 votes

    Stop that program. It is really shit.

    Pick a beginners lifting program like stronglifts.

    Beginners can literally eat shit and still make gains. That being said, eat a steady 1800cal a day and; because once again you are a beginner, you will have a pretty good recomp going.

    • -14 votes

      My friend has been doing this program for a few months and it's worked for him. He's gotten pretty big. Explain to me how it's shit. Also, he has a post-workout protein shake and sometimes Intra-workout shakes.

      • +23 votes

        You are a beginner and a teenager; whatever you do will work.

        A balanced program which builds a good base prior to going on a split will work better in the long run; will create a more balanced aesthetic.

        Good luck drinking intras and protein shakes. You could eat mcnuggets and get bigger as a biginner in your teens.

        •  

          I don't want to eat mcnuggets. If you didn't read my post, i'm chubby, or overweight. I eat healthy to lose weight. I do cardio to lose weight.

        • +4 votes

          You are a beginner and a teenager; whatever you do will work.

          That doesn't mean he shouldn't seek to do the best.

          A balanced program which builds a good base prior to going on a split will work better in the long run; will create a more balanced aesthetic.

          OP's split is balanced!

          You could eat mcnuggets and get bigger as a biginner in your teens.

          McNuggets are 15 % protein, 15 % fat and 17 % carbohydrate. OP needs a lower carbohydrate protein source to build muscle without gaining fat.

        • +1 vote

          @Scrooge McDuck: It's not balanced he is doing no legs (his leg day is just cardio)

        •  

          @Rohangiga:

          You didn't comprehend the words "either" or "or" in the OP:

          Saturday: Either Legs or Cardio (20m running/walking combo on treadmill and 10-15m bike)

        •  

          @Scrooge McDuck:

          Dude legs are literally your biggest muscles. They have the ability to bear more load more often than any other body part.

          Esp for those who want to lose weight and recomp; working the legs 2 or 3 times a week is an awesome way to build strength, increase your metabolism and get strong.

        •  

          @eggmaster:

          How many girls here like big legs on a guy?

        •  

          @Scrooge McDuck: and here I thought you went to the gym to get fit and healthy…

          What a stupid response really.

        •  

          @Scrooge McDuck:

          How many girls like a fit/skinny guy?

          Bitches love a good arse. Do you even lift bra

      • +4 votes

        Just ensure you get your technique correct. I did weights for 15 or so years and too often I would see people lifting weights incorrectly and remember you work the muscle on the way up and down so don't rush it

        Also, the muscle grows during rest when it's repairing itself so make sure you don't overwork it particularly biceps as they are a small muscle and everyone wants them big and fast

        • +3 votes

          I've made sure the way I lift weights is correct, and as far as I can tell, it is. Isn't protein used to repair muscles?

        • +6 votes

          @McYellowBird: your body can only take a certain amount of protein and then the rest just gets broken ffown by the liver and too much is no good for your liver.

          Here is a basic understanding

          http://www.livestrong.com/article/287078-how-much-protein-is...

        •  

          @chumlee:

          WPC is one of the best and cheapest sources of protein you can buy. Only oats and skim milk powder are appreciably cheaper per mass unit of protein but contain a lot more carbohydrate.

          WPC shakes are also much more convenient than consuming eggs, chicken or tuna; so they're a great way too boost the protein content of a diet.

        •  

          @Chumlee -great advice dude,most people don't understand these things.

        •  

          @chumlee:

          THIS. If only people went a bit further with their knowledge. A lot of kids these days already get enough protein daily to smash gains in the weight room. The problem is that they want to be huge in 4-6 weeks and get discouraged/side tracked. Eating healthy with a good intake of protein and persistent work will pay off and you won't waste a bunch of dollars on protein you don't need (and will make you gassy as all get out!)

      • +2 votes

        Your friend is not you and even though most of us have 2 arms and 2 legs our individual physiologies can be very different. I know people who can run marathons without raising a sweat but take them on a long sustained walk up hill and they're stuffed half way through. I am the opposite. I'm an old guy now and after many years have figured out/found an exercise regime and diet that works for me. Healthy organic food (mostly) and very slow progression in the gym. Even my weight timings seem to have an effect and for me it's 1 sec lift to 3 sec lower. I don't presume that what works for me will work for everyone else for the above reasons.

        TLDR: What works for someone else might not work for you. As others have suggested, focus on eating healthy, getting rid of soft drinks/ energy drinks would be a good place to start (there's big difference between having muscles and not being able to see them. :) ). Then when you have a healthy baseline experiment by adding in extra protein then.

        • +1 vote

          TLDR: What works for someone else might not work for you.

          The OP's reply isn't opposed to that concept.

          He was simply demanding an explanation and providing a counterexample to eggmaster's unreasoned assertion:

          Stop that program. It is really shit.

          Everyone who negged OP's reply seriously needs to improve both their comprehension skills and their attitude.

      • -1 vote

        It is a pretty bad routine.

        However, it will work the most important thing about weight lifting is consistency. You can have the worst routine in the world and do better than someone who half arses it with the best routine.

        I personally like Wendlers program that or stronglifts. They are both proven routines.

    •  

      Beginners can literally eat shit and still make gains

      Possible, but not recommended!

      • +15 votes

        lol it's not the protein that shunts your growth, it's the lifting which affects development of growth plates. Save the supplements for when you're 20, that's when you'll see proper results.

        All teenagers will grow taller, how tall they grow is another matter.

        •  

          I did some weightlifting for around 3 months before I went overseas (started 5 months ago) and started again but now I'm not screwing around.
          3 months during the weightlifting, I grew from 5'7" to 5'9". I don't see how my growth was stunted

        • +6 votes

          That's a myth, you shouldn't be promoting it, it actually does the opposite.

          According to Dr. Avery Faigenbaum of the University of Massachusetts, concerns about weight lifting stunting the growth of children and adolescents are outdated and misleading. Instead, he suggests that eating a healthy diet and exercising regularly allow you to achieve your maximal height, with inactive, unhealthy eaters more likely to have stunted growth. Betsy Keller of Ithaca College suggests that this myth exists because some researchers focus only on specific groups of athletes. In a 2008 review of the literature, she suggests that evidence for weightlifting's negative impact on growth arises solely from sports that are well-suited for shorter people, such as women's gymnastics and competitive dancing.

          In contrast with suggestions of stunted growth among young weightlifters, Betsy Keller points out that weightlifting may be more effective than other forms of exercise in promoting bone growth and density among adolescents.

          There's plenty of sources online
          https://www.livestrong.com/article/430166-can-lifting-weight...
          https://www.t-nation.com/training/tip-does-weight-lifting-st...

        • -6 votes

          @SubNoize: Mhmm, I heard it straight from professors in the field so that's what I follow - in the end, everything is a hypothesis. Personally i'd prefer to be on the safer side of things, especially when things such as height are in question.

          When someone uses the words "suggests" and "may," you know they haven't seen the whole picture.

        • +8 votes

          @Baebs:

          LOL.. that's the most ignorant post I've ever read… You narrow minded idiot, open your eyes and accept when you're wrong.. you'll grow as a person and be better for it.. I don't believe you'll continue reading but for the other users on this forum I've included further links to sources which is more than you and your professor did.

          Here's some facts from a scientific journal (you know those things your professor friend might read/write)

          Weight training in youth-growth, maturation, and safety: an evidence-based review.

          Experimental training protocols with weights and resistance machines and with supervision and low instructor/participant ratios are relatively safe and do not negatively impact growth and maturation of pre and early-pubertal youth.

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17119361

          The American Association Of Paediatrics

          Appropriate strength training programs have no apparent adverse effect on linear growth, growth plates or the cardiovascular system.

          http://pediatrics.aappublications.org/content/121/4/835

          Another science journal study - Strength Training in Children and Adolescents

          Strength training, when performed in a controlled, supervised environment, can help children and adolescents of all athletic abilities safely improve their strength and overall health and well-being. The health benefits of strength training far outweigh the potential risks, especially in today’s society where childhood obesity continues to rise.

          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3445252/

          Another study in a journal…

          A common concern for youth strength training is the belief that this exercise method can damage growth plates. Growth
          plates are made up of a layer of cartilage near the end of a bone where bone growth occurs. Although a few cases have
          been reported, there is no current evidence indicating structural damage due to strength training in adolescents. In fact, the
          American College of Sports Medicine states the main risk for these injuries are due to a lack of supervision and improper
          lifting.
          The American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM), the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) and the National
          Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA) support children's participation in appropriately designed and
          competently supervised strength training programs. Benefits include increasing the muscular strength of children and
          children's muscular endurance, body composition and sports performance improvements.

          https://www.journal.ccsenet.org/index.php/ies/article/view/3...

          And assuming that's too much for you, here's some pretty pictures that move and have audio attached that might help.
          https://youtu.be/kCZKbr76Nh4

          The videos sources are as follows

          https://www.niams.nih.gov/Health_Info/Growth_Plate_Injuries/...
          https://stronglifts.com/5x5/#Can_teens_do_StrongLifts_52155
          https://breakingmuscle.com/fitness/it-will-not-stunt-growth-...
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17119361
          http://www.exrx.net/WeightTraining/Weightlifting/YouthMiscon...
          https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21642379

        •  

          @SubNoize:

          +1

          Great post dude.

        • -2 votes

          @SubNoize: Relax mate, when I said "everything is a hypothesis" I literally meant everything which implied that I am probably wrong. Good job on the research 🥉 .

        • -1 vote

          @Baebs: Great reply. Cant say I would have replied in such a diplomatic way after being called an idiot. It's clear who the better person is.

        •  

          @FINCL:

          LOL.. that's the most ignorant post I've ever read… You narrow minded idiot, open your eyes and accept when you're wrong.

        • +3 votes

          @FINCL:

          Yeah I handled it wrong by calling them an idiot but their statement was infuriating and especially when they're giving advice to a child as fact in the previous comment as well. If people aren't educated on a topic then they shouldn't really speak on it.

          It'd be similar to me saying to you "The tooth fairy is real, my friend the dentist told me so anything you say is incorrect. I'm right"..

          regardless I'm usually pretty good at not just snapping at someone but the lack of sources/evidence irked me.

          Sorry!

        • +1 vote

          @FINCL:

          Great reply. Cant say I would have replied in such a diplomatic way after being called an idiot. It's clear who the better person is.

          Typical SJW philosophy: Virtue signalling over veracity.

        • +2 votes

          @SubNoize:

          If people aren't educated on a topic then they shouldn't really speak on it.

          ×1000!

          The Dunning–Kruger effect is prevalent here:

          In the field of psychology, the Dunning–Kruger effect is a cognitive bias wherein persons of low ability suffer from illusory superiority, mistakenly assessing their cognitive ability as greater than it is. The cognitive bias of illusory superiority derives from the metacognitive inability of low-ability persons to recognize their own ineptitude.

          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunning%E2%80%93Kruger_effect

          You're not alone in your infuriation at the responses in this thread. 👊

        •  

          @Scrooge McDuck:
          Yeah he isn't is he! Lots of baseless recommendations being posted!

        •  

          @Scrooge McDuck: Pfft. There is no way any of my commets are going to enhance my standing in this forum. And I don't really care to. So, your'e wrong… again.

  • +5 votes

    That is a very bad workout program in my opinion. You should do Legs on Tuesdays to split a little and rest the upper body next day. But hey, you are thinking of Leg workout as an option. Don't do it, if you want to choose, Legs should be always first. If I had to skip any of the workouts I never would skip Legs. Believe me, you won't regret it, never skip leg day mate.

    And hey, if you want to get into protein shakes, have a look at Bulknutrients, they are very good. I have been taking them for 2 years now. But in saying that, you should have plenty of time to prepare healthy meals without protein shakes unless you are a busy young man.

    • +1 vote

      Thanks for your comment. I do legs on Saturday so I can have a break. At school, we play football or soccer and I'm always running. My knees get sore during and after leg workouts, and the day after, my knees are sore to bend, that's why I do them on Saturday. Also, thanks for your advice on the protein.

      • +6 votes

        If your knees get sore it is most probably because you are not stretching or rolling them after the workout. I also get a knee pain a couple of hours after the workout but that's it. You also need to be careful with the technique, things like keeping your knees way past your toes when squatting is bad for your knees, etc.

      •  

        Running is not a strength workout for your legs!! It is cardio… cardio = cardiovascular. Running while it will give some strength to your legs is mainly for making you fit. Not strong!! Why would you do strength training for your upper body, but not your legs? You need to do low rep work on your legs as well just like you are doing with your upper body. Dont be a typical gym bro

        •  

          Running is not a strength workout for your legs!!

          He didn't say that it was. He was explaining why he performs his leg workout on Saturday — to space it from the running he does during the school week.

          Your lack of comprehension skills is appalling!

        •  

          I do cardio shit to lose body fat. I don't do it to gain leg muscle.

      • +1 vote

        I think it's weird that Stronglifts 5x5 has only been suggested once on this thread, when we're saying legs we don't mean leg press or leg extension/curls, these will make your knees hurt. We mean Squats and Deadlifts. Squats should not make your knees hurt unless you have significant knee ligament issues. When I started squatting and resolved my tight IT Band by rolling it the squats significantly improved my knee stability and allowed me to not only run way further but do that on rough trail runs-things that would dislocate me knees in the past.

        By the way lifting heavy burns so many calories that you won't need to worry about loosing weight as long as your diet is mostly clean.

        Stats,
        72kg, 6ft, SQ:140kgx3 DL:160kgx1 Bench: 85x1 Press:60kgx3

        Ps this is Ozbodybuilding.com right?

      •  

        Form is the most important thing. Leave your ego outside the gym and reduce the weights a bit if you are getting knee pains.Your knees get sore because of your form. Improve your form first before stacking more weights. After doing legs your leg muscles should be sore not Knees. Improve your form first. Dont stack weights just because others do it. You are not a sissy just because you lift light. Also stop doing knee extensions, they are not good for you. Do complex exercises like squats and lunges.
        ps: You are 14 you should not get knee pains. if you are getting pains you are not doing it right. I have had knee injuries before. I learnt it the hard way.

    •  

      Lol it seems that somebody skips leg's day XD

    •  

      Agreed, bad program. But I feel so more strongly than you do, I think.

      OP, why are you only training body parts once per week? Why splitting them up as though you've been training for 15 years?

      Find a good beginner program. At the risk of sounding rude, yours stinks.

      •  

        That's what my friend's program is, and it's been working for him. He's changing up his program next week I think, so I'll be following that too.

  1. MrHyde on 10/09/2017 - 18:21
  2. altomic on 10/09/2017 - 19:48
  3. rawm on 10/09/2017 - 19:45
  4. eggmaster on 10/09/2017 - 18:57
  5. Scrooge McDuck on 10/09/2017 - 23:33
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