Family Car - Wagon - Suggestions and Pricing

Having a baby (first) early next year and want to buy a safe car. Thinking of buying new only because we'd otherwise be buying near new (want it to be safe and have ISOFIX) and not sure that we'd save a lot of money buying second hand. Don't want anything too big - i.e. mid size rather than large.

We want a wagon (more room than a sedan, better to drive than an SUV).
Currently there aren't a lot of options:

Skoda Octavia for under $30,000
Ford Mondeo for closer to $40,000
Mazda 6 for hopefully around $33,000 (sport spec)
VW Golf $30,000 DA.

I don't really want to go European as I think ongoing costs will be higher (if for petrol, servicing, parts etc). My dad can do most stuff that needs doing. Don't trust that Skoda will be around for the long term, fewer sales means fewer parts around. I'm located in SA so fewer dealerships and wait times under warranty can be high.

Ford Mondeo is pretty old and hasn't been updated.

Really prefer the Mazda6 sport. The new version seems like a good deal and runs on 91. The reason I am going for sport is that it has all the safety features. Don't really care so much for other bells and whistles.

Conversely, could go second hand. There's not a lot of stock in SA, buying a car with <50,000km and 2012+ with safety features could end up costing similar. There are no Mazda6 or Mondeo wagons available in Adelaide. The Mazda6 sedans are all still going for around $25000 so it seems like it's not much more to get something new and at least a warranty plus no unknown damage.

Does anyone have any other suggestions? Would definitely prefer to keep spend around $30,000. I'm hoping that I could negotiate a Mazda6 wagon sport for ~$33,000 DA. Not sure if this is a total dream or not - does anyone have any experience in negotiating prices?

Should I be considering any other vehicles?

Poll Options

  • 101
    Mazda6
  • 56
    Octavia
  • 8
    Mondeo
  • 6
    Golf
  • 46
    Other

Comments

  • +10 votes

    Wagon - suggestions

    Has to be the Queen Family Truckster in metallic pea.

    If you think you hate it now wait till you drive it.

    Don't trust that Skoda will be around for the long term, fewer sales means fewer parts around.

    They are part of VW group and share a lot of components with audi/vw so parts not an issue. I've only ever heard glowing reports from skoda owners.

    • +5 votes

      Yeah I've been seeing new Skodas everywhere. I think the VW group is positioning them as the budget-friendly European option.

      But re spare parts, while they'll likely be plentiful, you still run into European level pricing for them and servicing.

      • +1 vote

        I bought a 2014 Octavia RS wagon last year, $24k, 95,000ks but I don't do that many, so thats fine for me.
        Absolutely love it!!!!

    • +2 votes

      Oh Clarke!

    • +2 votes

      Happy with ours. "Fixed price" servicing averaged ~$400/year for five years (actual price varies year by year). Haven't had to replace any parts, but H&D is probably right in that regard. We also basically don't drive it, we don't need a car at all but my wife wanted one - first year was < 2500km, we're nearing the end of the second now and it will be much less.

      Price was negotiated down to $26,500 IIRC on the MY17 model soon after release, but added on a longer warranty and an extra charge for metalic paint (which we didn't want, but options were limited - may not be a problem now). I also seem to recall seeing something saying that five year warranties were standard now so that might not be an additional cost (or it may be factored in to the base cost).

      •  

        Agree with above, I kept an eye out and grabbed a My18 Sport wagon with every option as a demo from a melbourne dealer for around $32 k with 6,000 ks on it.
        They do come with a 5 year warranty as standard and demos are currently being sold with 3 years servicing included through dealership for free since August, might not still be current though.
        I don’t use dealership for services and the intervals are 12 monthly or 15000 k’s, which vary in price but average out around $320 a service totalling $1600 ish over the 5 year warranty period, though I choose to do oil every 7500 k’s for my own reasons.
        So unless the “parts” are included in the service due to normal wear/tear any such replacements can be under warranty and free, depends on context obviously.
        It’s a great car and I love driving it, the sport has the polo drivetrain (1.4 ltr turbo petrol + 7 speed auto) and gets about 800 k’s to a 50 L tank of 98, though it will take 95. Which is about 25% more efficient that my previous “misler” 1.8ltr pulsar I was rocking.
        Iv had older VWs and had DSG issues, so the long warranty was a must for me, but skoda seem to be getting market share with what otherwise is a re-bodied VW car for much less % price. The comparable wagon wearing VW badges with my options would have been high $40 to 50 k so I’m happy with what I got.
        Cabin wise is not much bigger than a golf, so one to two baby seats will see it full but the boot is HUGE!
        Can only give positives for it, haven’t really identified any issues with mine over the 5000 odd k’s I have done and single service period.

    •  

      On that note I have a work colleague who has had nothing but issues with his octavia. Cheap interior quality meant that several of the switches have died from normal use. Mechanically nothing seems to have gone wrong but he said to me it's not kid friendly because of it.

  • +2 votes

    I have a 2010 Mondeo wagon that i bought for 10K from an auction house in Melbourne (in may 2014).

    Have had no issues with it. It did have 106,000KMs on it as it was a rep car but had been well serviced and maintained. The wife only does 8K a year in it now.

    Not sure if that helps though.

    • +2 votes

      I did same - now I do lots of highway Ks, Mondeo Titanium Wagon Deisel sucks em up, pulls well, has nifty safety features like Auto Cruise Control and consistantly returns 900+ K's to a tank (65L). No issues and I've done 70000Ks in 2 years, just replaced Tyres and brakes with required servicing is all - and a Transmission service early in the piece due to previous owner neglecting to do it. Serviced regularly it delivering for me daily. It's a large car - as long as a 2007 Fairlane and has heaps of space for all the gear - recommended.

      • +2 votes

        I wish I had done the same as you however I have the dud petrol version (bought new) from 2009. It's underpowered and always in the wrong gear. It is completely bulletproof and will go forever though.
        Can I ask you how much the transmission service cost? Only done 50k kms but the gearbox is quite crunchy

        •  

          The gearboxes are certainly not bulletproof. Sell it soon or start saving.

        •  

          My mate has a 2009 petrol Mondeo and to be honest the transmission feels worse than my beater shitbox 2007 Focus LX. I thought it was just his car but it seems like you have the same issue.
          It's very frustrating merging onto freeway because the transmission keeps hiccupping.

  • +1 vote

    Out of those options I would go the Mazda.
    There should be a poll for this wink wink

  • +7 votes

    You won't get a new Subaru under $30k, but have a look for demo / 2nd-hand.
    Lots of safety equipment, and lots of useable space.

    I second TightBottom's comment re Skoda.

    I personally think that Mazda are overpriced.

    •  

      Levorg or Outback?

      •  

        Or Forester.
        Forester and Outback have the more space; Levorg is more of a hatch.

        • -1 vote

          Levorg has more rear passenger and boot space volume compared to Outback..

          •  

            @pitiek: No it doesnt, 2017 Outback has a much bigger boot and rear seat space than the Levorg..

            adding to that the Levorg is much lower than the Outback so getting kids in and out will be a nightmare

            Levorg is a sports wagon, Outback is a family wagon..

        • +1 vote

          Levorg is basically same dimensions as Gen 4 Liberty wagon. Much more useable than a hatch

        • +1 vote

          BS. Levorg is not a hatch

    •  

      Levorg, but I think that might be over budget.

      I use to have an older Impreza wagon and was involved in an accident at speeds of 80 (was t-boned, passenger side), everyone came out safely.

      Current Subaru models all have a 5 star Ancap safety rating.

      https://www.ancap.com.au/safety-ratings/subaru

      Subarus are really nice to drive and stick to the road too.

    •  

      After having several Subaru's here and oversea's (Legacy TS type R and GT-B Twin Turbo and a Forester)

      We went and brought an Outlander which is the worst thing to drive ever, however its mechanically sound.

  • +8 votes

    I can't believe you just said that you don't think you will save alot of money buying second hand. I can assure you that you will. You will also get alot of other people that will agree. Take a look @ 1 year old cars with warranty.

    It's good you're planning for the future. Have you driven a suv? I know you aren't interested . It's the best thing we've ever done,especially for the boot. Prams, shopping, bags are such a ease now.

    •  

      I think I could save maybe $8000. That is a lot of money, but maybe not worth it for trading off peace of mind/warranty/newer safety features offered now.

      I haven't ever driven an SUV. The Mazda6 has a bigger bootspace than tha CX-5 I think, so I guess I'm just biased in that it doesn't seem worth it.

      • +1 vote

        Give it a go, try the suv and if you don't like it. Just leave it. I reckon just give it a go just to say that you've driven it.

      •  

        I agree than you should look at the SUVs that are available.

        I had a yaris when I had my first baby, so was very in need of a bigger car. After trying many new cars, I found the Honda CRV was best for us. The interior features of the Mazda CX5 was way better but the CRV had less blind spots and better visibility.

        My friend had a Mazda 6 when she had her first baby and has recently upgraded to a Mazda CX7 because she saw how easy it was for me to take the kids out of the car.

        SUVs are a back saver with babies.

      • +2 votes

        If you're happier with the wagon, I strongly disagree to all those suggesting an SUV!

        Yeah we have a CX5, would have much preferred a Mazda 6 as well, but wife hates the look of wagons.
        Mazda CX5 is closer in size internally to the Mazda 3 than Mazda 6, you'd need to go a CX8 or CX9 for comparable size.

        The only real advantage of an SUV over a wagon/sedan is that it's easier to load a 2 year old uncooperative toddler when you don't have to bend down as far, probably a bit friendlier on the back. For babies it's no big deal either way unless you don't even lift.

        Only real issue we've had with the CX5 is one the springs… just fell out…
        Mazda service centre said they put in a warranty claim with Mazda Australia and they'd never heard of it etc etc, couldnt figure out how it happened, promised to follow up on the warranty claim for us.. Never heard back (unfortunately we paid for repair up front, couldnt wait for a warranty claim with kids!)

      • +10 votes

        If safety is at the core of your requirements, I'd urge you to exhaust all your options with cars before considering an SUV. Higher ground clearance means higher center of gravity, and there's no denying the physics around it that this is inherently less safe in comparison.

        There's almost always a car at a LOWER price than an SUV which does everything the SUV does (we're not talking off-roading, so we're not talking hardcore 4x4s), but only better, more comfortable, economical, and SAFER. There are of course exceptions, but those are, well, exceptions. SUVs may be better at dealing with an accident (basically because it carries more inertia, and it transfers the energy to the poor car it's colliding with). However, a car is far better at AVOIDING an accident.

        All the SUV fanbois are going to neg me now, but they'd have nothing to say about the physics behind it.

        • +1 vote

          A reasonable generalisation re: active and passive safety.

          By your reasoning, a raised passenger vehicle of reasonable size and weight, with above average acceleration, braking, bump absorption and cornering abilities, may generally be the best compromise then, in terms of both active and passive safety.

          For specifics re: passive safety on terms of driver protection, Google “used car safety ratings” and look at the latest data posted on howsafeisyourcar.com.au. Look for models with at least 4 stars, if not 5 and labelled as a Safer Pick as well.

          •  

            @dazeet: That's pretty much how I came up with the Mazda6. Before this year it was always a 'safer pick' for the 08-11 version but it's now at 4 stars. However I know the newer version will be even safer. It's also cheaper than the Subaru and Ford. Sadly Skoda doesn't seem to have the numbers to show up in these rating guides yet.

            • +1 vote

              @em: Good on you re: UCSR.

              It’s a pity UCSR only rates crash protection for the driver. But compared to ANCAP, I don’t think you get the same problems of having the goalposts moved every year, having the rating mixed with active safety, and the UCSR is comparable across vehicle sizes/classes, unlike ANCAP or I feel, any other NCAP ratings internationally.

              Which is probably why if you Google howsageisyourcar rating lifecycle, the bottom left hand corner of that page suggests UCSR is a more realistic representation, and therefore supersedes the ANCAP.

              Combine 5-Star UCSR “Safer Pick” and more reliable models based on owner reviews, and the result is only a very small but good shortlist for you to choose from. Especially as some of the contenders do not have a UCSR due to rarity/not enough real world crashes yet, to come up with a UCSR.

        •  

          for average city driving with majority of accidents the difference in car vs suv ability to avoid accident is going to be small. Negligible compared to the difference of awareness / skill of the person behind the wheel.

          certainly if you are the driver not at fault, there might not even be anything you can do to avoid the accident.

          ie, if you are stationary, and someone smashes into you. The physics might say that your car with a lower centre of gravity could do a sharper turn. But in reality cornering ability made no difference in avoiding this accident.

          Going further, you could consider the physics says larger objects (SUVs) reflect more light / easier to see. So in this case, the physics shows the SUV would have been better for "avoiding" an accident as it its easier to see.

          also SUV are better at dealing with accident not just physics, but reality in that your vital organs are higher up, and if there is going to be impact on your body you want it further down.

          •  

            @fourofjacks: By this logic, people movers (of the same external size) will be even more visible than SUVs, thanks to their 1-box design. With more space inside, too.

            They also usually ride a bit higher than normal passenger vehicles, but not so high to adversely affect active safety, so the best of both worlds really :)

        •  

          Only really a problem if your planing to take corners at 80km/h

    •  

      He's right actually, 1 year old second hand cars aren't really a big price drop from brand new. Do agree that an SUV is the ideal choice if it fits budget which could be an issue.

      •  

        I guess every brand may be different. We bought our 1yo outlander (not everyone's cup of tea) for $25,000. 4wd and 7 seater.

        Brand new outlander is $30,000+ for manual and 5 seater.

        •  

          Guess makes sense for some of the lesser demanded makes but the popular ones like Toyota/Mercedes etc then it's not a big difference in price.

      • -1 vote

        Usually brand new cars comes with year of registration.
        And some brands warranties is not transferable. So not worth it.

        • +3 votes

          And some brands warranties is not transferable. So not worth it.

          I didn't think this was the case. Do you know which brands are these?

    •  

      I agree on the SUV front. When we had our first baby we already had a 4x4 Nissan Pathfinder so didn't realise how good it was. Then we moved and got a station wagon instead. It was horrible compared to the 4x4 having to crouch and lift the baby into/out of the car. Then I did my back in lifting said baby - 2 bulged discs. It didn't happen in the car, but it made it impossible for me to transfer the baby to/from the car for quite a while. Then we went back to a SUV and haven't looked back since.

      And the bad handling of an SUV vs a wagon is kind of moot, since you won't be picking up any 10ths on the corners with a baby onboard, unless you want to be cleaning up vomit the rest of the day.

      • +1 vote

        I have no idea why some barnacles negged you.

        Totally valid points and I agree with you.

        SUVs are definitely more ergonomic for getting little kids in and out.

        I agree with you also on the handling. It amazes me the people who comment on the "dangers" of SUVs. If you're approaching the tip-over point in a modern SUV, you're obviously driving like a f#$@wit and probably shouldn't be driving at all.

        • +1 vote

          Theres a lot of SUV hate on here, mostly from A200 "AMG" wannabe drivers I think.

  • -1 vote

    I know you're not looking for an SUV but can I suggest the Hyundai Tucson? Lots of room and perfect for kids. Easier to get the baby in and out because of the higher ride height.

    Suspension has been tuned for aussie roads and having recently moved on to a sedan, I can tell you… I really miss the ride of the Tucson.

    5 year warranty, fixed price servicing and free roadside assistance. Why would you buy second hand for the same price range?

    •  

      Mazda has 5 year warranty and fixed price servicing. If I got the base model for $30,000 I'd still add the $2,200 safety back so still comparable in price to the Mazda6.

    • +5 votes

      What does 'tuned for Aussie roads' mean? I have been driving 20 years, 10 in Europe and 10 in Australia and the roads aren't actually any different!

      •  

        I dunno, every journalist article i've read says that our roads are rough and have potholes, but roads in Europe are perfect?

        •  

          European roads are much more likely to have potholes. Potholes are generally caused by water freezing in the road structure and causing damage, which driving over exacerbates.

        •  

          As a cyclist, I often read about bikes with a comfortable ride (and the most comfortable bike will never be as comfortable as any car)- and I thought pfft… who cares? Moved to the UK, and trust me - UK roads are 50 times worse than Aus.

      •  

        Unlike Europe/Germany Australia has a large percentage of poorly maintained and unsealed roads so you'll find that European cars are often engineered with a firmer ride that works better on smooth surfaces.

        Here is a good write up.

        You're going to get suspension tailored to different regions, cars bound for the Middle East could have a different setup to that to Sweden for example which has iced snowy roads.

        I can speak from experience, I've moved from Hyundai to a VW and their is a noticeable difference. It rides great on the highway but struggles out in woop woop.

        • +3 votes

          Hyundai and KIA have insanely stiff chassis', so for the Australian market they minimise body roll to give their cars a sporty feel. Hyundai's should be slightly more vague than KIA's, but nowhere near as vague as a floaty international tune everybody else uses. They also add resistance to power steering to give road feel, where as the competition tends to remove it in everything but sports models.

          It has nothing to do with our roads and everything with how the local arms wants their cars to feel.

          They get a parts bin and can change a few items, like dampers, springs, etc. They model everything, but they will often pick a few alternate choices to test fringe cases which they test at an international proving grounds then locally. They have to make a compelling case to head office if their changes add cost. Australian suspension changes have seen international release.

          @Wozz Europe has cobble stone…

          @Ryanek Hyundai and KIA have some excellent multi link rear suspension tunes. You were probably comparing it to a torsion beam set up. These cars have welded anti roll bars/strut bars as part of their chassis. Local tuning is purely suspension.

      •  

        Potholes, bumps, irregular roads and concrete roads. There are very few good quality bitumen roads around Sydney.

        Amazingly, even the newly resurfaced James Ruse Drive in Sydney has got 4 nasty indentations/channels which run across the highway. They are possibly for thermal expansion or irrigation. It had been level before the resurfacing of the roads. So everyday, I whack these nasty bumps while driving at 90km/h. I've just had 2 sets of struts and bearings replaced on one of my cars, and I think another car of mine will need strut replacement soon.

        For comparison from my experience, roads in Malaysia, Singapore and USA are much better.

  • +1 vote

    2018 Hyundai i40 Active Auto Wagon new ~ $37000

  • +3 votes

    I would look into a 2-3 year old Kia, they come with 7 years warranty and have improved dramatically from back in the day. Look at the sportage for the size you are after.

  • +7 votes

    Skoda easily.

    Best value on your list. We got the wagon for our young family as I also wanted a medium sized wagon, not a commodore or falcon.

    The badge snobs won't bother test driving one ….but if you do you'll buy it. Miles ahead of it's competition in terms of features and value for money.

    •  

      Value for money is big, it'll probably be easily $4000 less than the Mazda. I'm just wondering if that will get eaten into faster with servicing and parts, major repairs etc. I'll definitely test drive it before I make a decision.

      • +1 vote

        Skoda have 5 year warranty now and underneath the Octavia is just a Golf. So parts are plentiful.

        Skoda also have capped price servicing now which is decent value.

        • +3 votes

          It's more the major repair horror stories, especially if the Octavia is just a golf. Mazda also has 5 year warranty and capped price servicing. It really is probably close, but Mazda has the better reputation.

          Edit: there's also only one Skoda dealership in Adelaide I think, which could make repairs difficult. Even servicing might get annoying.

        • +1 vote

          @em:

          True, Mazda certainly have a better rep. Can't argue with that.

          I'd still suggest the Skoda has more interior features and little things to make you smile than the Mazda, and for $4k less.

        •  

          The problem is the resale cliff that Skoda falls off. I seriously looked at an Octavia but compared to the Mazda I would lose $'000 in 5 years.

          •  

            @blwnhr: Interesting, do you have data to show on that?
            I kept an eye on skoda for the last 2 year before buying one and if anything, actually found the post 2015 models to have less depreciation in 3-5 years than even Mazda.
            Resale’s appear pretty consistently in the low $20’s for a $34 k entry price after 3 years, and that was prior to skoda bumping to warranty from 3 - 5 years (2017 onwards).

            •  

              @FlexBargain: I don't have access to RedBook anymore.
              Anecdotally it is certainly the case. My neighbour is an Octavia owner, they were trying to sell for many many months, no takers. They had to drop the price to the floor before they even got sniffs of interest. The same from someone else I was talking to, wish they never bought it.
              List price on CarSales et al is not an indicator of sale price.
              Speaking candidly with the Skoda dealer (of which I know the management) and they acknowledge even they struggle to sell used Skoda.

              •  

                @blwnhr: Yeah I hear what your saying, but to echo it, I hear the opposite through work colleagues who have the skodas. I think it is very dependent on what year/model, the earlier stuff (pre 2014) seems less in demand and is reflected in re-sale. The ambition range seemed to get a bump in their sales and the sport range available 2017 onwards seems to have been pretty popular, there’s 3 people at my location who have that alone, as do I!
                Seems the entry level Mazda 6 wagon Sport is $38152 (asterisks that doesn’t provide drive away price or further charges) and the 2015 vintage asking price is averaging about $22-24 k.
                The skoda equivalent (base Octavia wagon) is $29490 (again asterisks with no indication) & 2015 asking averages $18-20 k.
                As you indicate, asking price is different to sale data, but it’s a reasonable indicator as to where the free market is expecting to fall. This rough figures indicate about a similar % difference between price @ new & asking @ resale, but the variable being which ones sell quicker v slower and at what proximity to asking prices.
                Either way I am not concerned should I decide to sell mine @3-5 mark, will try to remember to open a thread with outcome if I do!

      • +1 vote

        Depending on how many k's you do a year, octavia interval is 15,000k or 12 months, I think mazda is 10,000. If your under 10k then no difference, over that could be doing less service per k's traveled.

        I've had an octavia for 5 years, really nice to drive, no issues so far, but the new mazda 6 is tempting.

    • +2 votes

      not a commodore or falcon
      badge snobs

      Hmmm

    • +2 votes

      Second this. I have owned a couple of skoda's for 5+ years are have not faced any issues.
      For service I use a independent mechanic, provide oil which I buy during the 30%-50% off sales. This helps keeping the service cost quite low.
      The only issue I see is if its a factory order you will have very long wait times.

  • +2 votes

    Mazda6 hands down. Cannot beat that Japanese reliability. Also they look killer in the soul red or titanium grey. Also, it runs on e10 too.

  • +2 votes

    Subaru Outback

  • +1 vote

    low km second hand outbacks going around for 30k

  • +1 vote

    Nothing can beat hybrid engine from Toyota. 657,000 km still going strong!
    https://www.carsales.com.au/private/details/Toyota-Camry-201...

  •  

    I know you’ve said no SUV, but if you or your partner are taller, getting bub into the car seat in a taller vehicle is easier. I found at 180cm I was having to either duck my head down into the car and not having a lot of room or reaching arms in with head outside and not being able to see in lower cars.

    Still, Mazda, Skoda would be my pick of the poll list.

  • +3 votes

    Plenty of personal opinions on this topic, and we are all correct of course.

    OP needs to identify what is really important and then road test a couple of them.

    I suggest that, for a new baby, your factors for consideration are:
    - Safety (compare online)
    - Space (you can compare online, but actually view a few to consider how much is useable; consider that you won't have the back seats down, if wheel arches eat into the rear space, pram storage needs length/depth rather than height, etc.)
    - Cost (purchase and ongoing; inclusive of service frequency/kms)
    - Ease of driving
    - Etc.

  • +6 votes

    Octavia driver reporting in.

    We went through all this early this yr.

    Take your pram, carseat when test driving.

    Was initially looking for used. Wife would've bought the 1st thing she saw. I on the other hand, had a criteria. Happy with our choice thus far.

    Out and about it's a game of spotting another Skoda:)

    Negs are that if you want to add bits and pieces, you'll have to source it from Europe or NZ.

    I'm still trying to locate a bug/rock deflector for my MY18. Not so easy.

  • +4 votes

    What about a VF commodore?

  • -1 vote

    Check out Subaru, XV, Outback, Levorg, Forester. Get model with eyesight. Far better than the cars mentioned

    • +1 vote

      Sorry. The xv is not a wagon. I laughed hard watching my old man struggling to manhandle two medium sized suit cases in his with the seats up.

      Forester…horizontal space is lacking in the rear with seats up.

      Outback…as an long time owner of a Subaru liberty, this was on top of my list… Pricey!

      •  

        You're right, its a hatch.

        I was surprised too about the small boot in the XV. Can only fit a pram in our XV but can fit two prams in my 17 STI, go figure.

  • +5 votes

    Demo Skoda Octavia RS for me for mid $30s. Golf GTI in a Wagon.

    Brilliant value for money. Skoda aren't going anywhere, they are owned by VW.

    Even if Skoda quit the Australian market today, by law VW will have to supply parts for the next 10 years.

    Furthermore, servicing parts are interchangeable with VW and Audi, or you can get Skoda specific parts from overseas.

  • +1 vote

    My work Hyundai i40 wagon was just handed back with 120K on the clock. It was still really solid and tight with no rattles. It cruised beautifully and returned between 8 to 9 l/100ks with a mix of city driving. Huge in the back. One of the best work supplied cars I've ever had in 30 years.

    It was replaced with a Golf wagon. Performance and economy is fantastic. The DSG gearbox tries to be too economical too quickly in its choice of gears and feels like it is a slug. Then it will suddenly find another gear and fly. Just takes getting used to. Currently averaging less than 6l/100kms. Big negative is the expected life of the gearbox. With only 2,500 km's on the clock it has already found a false neutral between 4th and 5th in a 80 k/h zone and left me drifting to the side of the road with no power. I've got a steep driveway and even using the hill hold I can smell the clutch burning. Same gearbox in the Skodas.

    I love the technology but think simpler could be better in the long term.

    • +2 votes

      All dsgs are not the same. You probably have the crappy 7 speed dry clutch model that comes with the low powered models. High powered petrols and all diesels come with the 6 speed, which is wet clutch and many orders of magnitude better in all ways.

    •  

      Its probably the 7 speed DSG. 6 speed gearbox is better.

      •  

        I have a 2015 Golf sportwagen DSG dry clutch, with 235000kms on the clock. I think most of the dsg bugs have been worked out. Almost all the horror stories are with the mk6 golf pre 2013.

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