Scammed By Recruitment Company - What Can I Do?

Hi.
On the 15th of January, wanted to apply for an internship programme at H & R Block, carried out by the hiring company called GTRS. There were two payment options. First, $490 and the rest is after passing the interview and guaranteeing the internship. Second was upfront payment for the full service which is $20 discounted, equal to $1,900. I paid $1900 and I was told by their hiring manager, even I fail the interview I will be refunded, except $490.

I failed the H & R Block's interview, and then nobody contacted me or provided me a second interview. If they are unable to provide me at least two interviews they were supposed to me refund too. But for this, I had to wait 10 weeks at least. However, I waited for a month and they didn't take any action, they weren't doing anything literally. So I emailed them on the 15th of February, yet no replies. Then I raised a transaction dispute via my credit card at the end of February. My claim has been rejected because I was told my credit card company that I changed my mind hence I am not eligible for a refund. Today, I reported this to ACCC.

Here are other victims of this company.

I don't know what I should do at this point? Waiting for it to be 10 weeks so that I can claim a refund? Paying a visit to their office since they don't respond my calls and emails. Or should I take it to tribunals? Or is it completely my fault? What do you suggest?

I am in Melbourne by the way.

Related Stores

gtrs.com.au
gtrs.com.au

Comments

  • +11 votes

    As you've already done, a report to the ACCC is a good start.

    Recruitment firms who don't gouge applicants are bad enough, this lot is ridiculous.
    "Discounting" fees for applicants who leave good reviews (before their application is even processed) is definitely an alarm bell.

    I would follow up with the ACCC report and take it from there.

    •  

      what happens if ACCC finds me rightful? will they force the company to refund me?

      • +7 votes

        ACCC doesn't care about individual consumer complaints. Literally not their area.

        • +1 vote

          Not quite true, they do care. They do collect information on complaints and, where they receive a large number of them, they may take enforcement action.

          But it's not their area to act & arbitrate individual complaints, this is for fair trading in your state. In Victoria it's Consumer Affairs Victoria start there.

  • +35 votes

    It is unfortunate that you have got scammed.

    I would have Red-flagged a request for payment to go for a job.

    Contact the Police.

    • +11 votes

      The payment is to a recruitment agency.

      This is a civil matter. Police is irrelevant.

      • +5 votes

        Being scammed (if proven) is a criminal offence.
        Therefore it will be a Police matter

        •  

          Is this proven?

          • +3 votes

            @tshow: We will find out .. if the OP updates us …
            Plus to ask for money for an interview in my view is dodgy

            • +2 votes

              @vinni9284: It's not best practice but it is a private service and the service to get an interview has been rendered.

              Unless the service promises landing a job, you pay for services rendered.

              In this case, the service is not considered complete but has been partially rendered.

              This is not fee for no service. Just poor service.

              • +26 votes

                @tshow: If a potential employer or 3rd party wants to employ me and I have to pay a fee, I would run for the hills …. regardless of your interpretation

                • -1 vote

                  @vinni9284: The employer doesn't care if you pay a fee or not.

                  That arrangement is between you and the recruitment agency.

                  The recruitment agency is not the HR department of the employer.

                  • +14 votes

                    @tshow: OK .. 3rd party then.

                    The recruitment agency will get their cut/commission once the candidate is employed.

                    Why would they want an upfront payment from a potential candidate for a service to represent the employer where the employer should pay?
                    So it seems that they may have 100 potential candidates that all pay for the recruitment agents.

                    Therefore, let's do the math according to the OP's claim for an example of 100 candidates.

                    $490 they keep x 100 potential candidates that don't get employed = $49000.

                    Does that seem like a scam?

                    That is already a Red flag for me.

                    Cheers

                    • +3 votes

                      @vinni9284:

                      $490 they keep x 100 potential candidates that don't get employed = $49000.

                      Does that seem like a scam?

                      A scam is not the same as a bad deal.

                      If I sold you an eneloop for $100, it's not scam if you did indeed receive the eneloop.

                      It seems GTRS bills $490 to make the application (more on successful employment), which they did as evidenced by the interview. They offered a 20% discount if the payment for successful employment is made upfront. The terms and conditions which include refunding the advance payment includes a 10 week wait period.

                      All this is very unattractive and honestly, if I am H&R, I wouldn't hire anyone who accepts a contract like that so I guess GTRS has provided a service to both parties.

                      •  

                        @tshow: Regardless of its legitimacy, it seems like IMO the employer/recruitment agency business model wants to increase their coffers:

                        1 - Not hire a recruitment/HR officer or some hybrid office worker to employ potential candidates.
                        2 - To hire a 3rd party recruiter that gets their cut/commission once the candidate is employed.
                        3 - The potential candidate has to pay the recruiter's salary/time (although this should be paid by the employer regardless if they are successful in application/employment or not)
                        4 - Possible tax incentive/deductions to the employer/recruitment agency & or tax application discount considering their main business is taxation.

                        All this is very unattractive and honestly, if I am H&R, I wouldn't hire anyone who accepts a contract like that

                        Totally agree!

                        Would I want to work for them?
                        Nope!
                        if they are already scumming money from you before potentially employing you IMO, they will scum more when you work for them.

                        Tbh, how many dodgy job applications are out there that are from employers/agencies?
                        … and they want a probity check from us! LOL!!!

                        Cheers

                        • -4 votes

                          @vinni9284:

                          it seems like IMO the employer/recruitment agency business model wants to increase their coffers

                          Yes, it's called a business not a charity.

                          •  

                            @HighAndDry: Completely understand but how far does it have to go?
                            Would you pay a recruitment agency to get a job considering that you may be out or pocket (and very likely) for $490 per application?

                            • +1 vote

                              @vinni9284: I wouldn't, but OP is completely free to pay whatever he wants to. He's free to just give away money too.

                              • +1 vote

                                @HighAndDry: Analogy; customers using a 3rd party lending officers (brokers) that receive a Home Loan successfully.

                                The lending officers receive payment from the customer (Banks pay the broker but it is passed on to the customer indirectly)

                                The customer defaults on the mortgage, loses their home and now the Banks are held accountable for a class action.
                                The Banks pay compensation to the customer due to the candidate not being eligible for the home loan in the first place.

                                The customer has a choice whether to accept the loan of not…. or as you say give away their money too!

                                Can by any chance, the job may not exist or has been filled considering that they are receiving $490 from potential candidates that default?

                                • -1 vote

                                  @vinni9284: Not sure if I'm understanding your analogy, but yes - customers should be responsible if they took out a loan they couldn't or didn't repay. No fault of the banks or the brokers at all unless they flat-out lied.

                                  In this case? H&R Block interviewed OP - I don't think they'd do that if there weren't an opening - they usually pay too so they'd be wasting money.

                                  • +1 vote

                                    @HighAndDry:

                                    H&R Block interviewed OP

                                    Good morning. :P

                                    No. The first interview would be conducted by the external recruitment agency. Otherwise no point having them.
                                    Therefore, the potential candidate is funding this process hence no monetary payment is required from the employer until the first interview is deemed successful and the internship granted.

                                    It seems like owning a recruitment firm is very lucrative going by their business model.
                                    There are a lot of Grey areas for them to declare genuinely how many candidates were really ineligible for the job, regardless even if it is legally declared for Tax purposes.

                                    Cheers

                    •  

                      @vinni9284: Im getting into that line of work :o

        •  

          OP wasn't scammed - it's a civil payment dispute.

        •  

          police will not get involved.

        • -1 vote

          Police are useless and won't get involved.

        • -1 vote

          While I agree that this sort of thing should be a police matter as it's fraud, in my experience the police won't get involved unless you are a large corporation making the complaint.

      •  

        Fraud is fraud. It is a Police matter.

        Also respond back to your CC company saying you did not change your mind, you were never delivered the promised interviews. You paid for a service that was not delivered.

        •  

          You calling it fraud doesn't make it fraud.

          See the comments. It is a bad deal and may be practising opportunistically.

          you were never delivered the promised interviews. You paid for a service that was not delivered.

          He did attend an interview.

          This claim is fraud.

    •  

      Police will not get involved as this is a civil matter.

      You might think that it might be criminal but it is not. Have a look here what police MUST prove beyond reasonable doubt: http://www.judicialcollege.vic.edu.au/eManuals/CCB/30708.htm

      Any of the points of proof has a doubt, it won't get through in court.

  • +2 votes

    Love how all the 5 star reviews are all from users with 1 review and either with Indian looking names or names which aren't capitalised.

    •  

      This in itself might explain why they have so many unsuccessful applicants who're not happy. But some of the reviews, don't make me like the company, but makes me believe the company isn't a complete fraud:

      For example, from a 1-star review:

      They sent me to a young start-up company, which lasted a month before closing down.

      So at least one negative (presumably un-paid) reviewer actually did get placed. I don't see how they can blame a recruiter for the company failing.


      As an aside, this is going to be what the mortgage broker industry is going to resemble if the RC recommendations are passed.

      "I paid such and such money to a broker for a loan, and then they couldn't get me a loan, and they won't refund me my money!"

  • +54 votes

    Why would you pay a recruitment company? I don't understand…

    • +12 votes

      You DON'T pay a recruitment company ever. That is not how they work.

      • +24 votes

        My question was rhetorical in response to this:

        There were two payment options. First, $490 and the rest is after passing the interview and guaranteeing the internship. Second was upfront payment for the full service which is $20 discounted, equal to $1,900. I paid $1900 and….

        If I went to a recruiter and was given this proposition I'd walk out and get back on seek.com.au

      •  

        It's a private service provider. If they provide a service, they are free to bill whoever was willing to be financially responsible.

        They do not typically operate by billing the "employee" as it is easier to invoice "employer". That doesn't mean that there is some law that dictates how the industry operates down to the details of payment.

        • +17 votes

          I agree. They claim to be providing a service and therefore have a fee attached.

          That doesn't make it a favourable proposition or any less of a rort.

          What I am trying to say is, only a mug would pay $2000 for the possibility of a job, irrespective of promised reimbursement. Even at $500 it is ridiculous and clearly this company is preying on international students or recent migrants.

          • +6 votes

            @Xiongmao: Are you calling OP a mug? "Mods! Personal attack here!" /jk lol.

          • +2 votes

            @Xiongmao: You are right, their potential targets are those international students and new immigrants who are struggling to land a job/interview. I remember a few years ago when I was in uni, I went to a career fair hosted in campus, those recruitment companies were already there lurking international students into signing a contract with them which they guarantee that you will get a job after paying them $3300 lol.
            Btw it was 2013 and I can't believe it's still not regulated today,

          •  

            @Xiongmao: If there was a more reasonable split (say, 100-200 for an interview, then 1800 when you get the job), then honestly this could be better than how recruitment companies currently operate.

            Most recruitment agencies might get you the job for free, but you're on the books for their company (hays, chandler macleod, etc), instead of the actual company, and then you're basically a second-class employee whos paid 80% of what the actual employees are for the same work.

            •  

              @UnknownCamper:

              and then you're basically a second-class employee

              Then find your own job if you're good enough. If you're not good enough to find the job yourself, then practically speaking you aren't on the same level as the other employees.

    • +4 votes

      internship programme

      A lot of people need internships as part of their university degree (requirement) which is also used to get points for PR or to break into the workforce (need experience to work, can't find work without experience).

      This is even more true for international people who have trouble finding work as a lot of companies are Citizenship or PR only.

      That leaves a lot of international students essentially ready to pay just for a way into an internship which companies like this can take advantage of for $$$. Because without it many students won't get their degree (and points and thus PR).

      • -6 votes

        Because without it many students won't get their degree (and points and thus PR).

        That just means they didn't meet the requirements to get their degree, and the PR. They're not owed either - it's up to their own ability or lack thereof. If that makes them desperate - maybe they should be smarter and not need recruiters to get a job? Competent grads can get jobs without recruiters.

        • +1 vote

          They're not grads, they're full-time students…

          • -5 votes

            @Quantumcat: Competent workers at any level can get jobs without recruiters.

            And just to forestall your next objection: …and if they can't, then the economy doesn't have a shortage of those workers and they shouldn't get a PR in the first place.

            •  

              @HighAndDry: Read the post you replied to again. They don't have a career yet, they're still students.

              • -4 votes

                @Quantumcat: Make your point if you have one, because so far as I can see, that's irrelevant.

                • +8 votes

                  @HighAndDry: THEY ARE STUDENTS. They might never have had a job before. They need an internship to finish university and begin their career. They need help. Just because you don't need help, doesn't mean other people don't. I seriously wonder sometimes, how you manage to operate in the real world, as you can't leave your own mind. There is something defective in your head.

                  First you said grads, they're not grads.

                  Then you said workers, they're not workers.

                  How did you manage to pass high school with such poor reading comprehension?

                  • -7 votes

                    @Quantumcat: They're applying for a job - is the difference between a "good worker" and a "good prospective worker" really that important to you?

                    I don't care that:

                    THEY ARE STUDENTS. They might never have had a job before. They need an internship to finish university and begin their career. They need help.

                    They're international students who're here to study, and who are offered a chance at a PR Visa if they show that they are capable enough in a field of work in which Australia has a shortage of workers.

                    PR is not guaranteed, nor is it an entitlement or right. You want to help them so much, start your own business and offer them a job. Can't do that? Then beggars can't be choosers.


                    Also just on a tangent, can I point out the irony of this bit?

                    Just because you don't need help, doesn't mean other people don't. I seriously wonder sometimes, how you manage to operate in the real world

                    Apparently I both 'can operate without help', and also 'can't operate in the real world' at the same time - literally in consecutive sentences according to you. No wonder you find it hard to string together a coherent argument.


                    Also, another tangent:

                    There is something defective in your head.

                    Tsk tsk, stigmitising mental health issues now? I thought you bleeding hearts were better than that! I don't actually have any mental health issues, thanks for asking, but hey you didn't know that did you?

                    • +5 votes

                      @HighAndDry: I was an international student.

                      What QuantumCat and Trustnoone are saying is correct.

                      In the John Howard days, all you had to do was to graduate in MODL degrees and you would get a PR. Even that was difficult for International Student (now ex) because their prior visa condition stated they must study full time which means less time on working or doing intra-degree internship. These days, Unis like Swinburne as part of the degree makes student go to companies and work as interns as a condition of graduation.

                      Which means, International Students who don't have work experience had to compete with locals who tend to have Work Experience and that was not easy at all. So they had to resort to this "paid" internship thingy which is sad.

                      To be honest, the original intent was international students are supposed to go back and they would have had an edge against their own locals as they have overseas degree but as you can see… life in OZ is too good to pass for some.

                      With the changes of PR, it is almost impossible to get a PR without a sort of work experience (as that point is needed) and that's why this situation is happening.

                      Now back to intra-degree internship, international students also have to compete with locals and many companies ask for residency. Thinking from a company point of view, if you are going to leave overseas after graduating (which is the intent of why study visa exists), why would you hire international students? And so the PR/Citizen thingy becomes an extremely huge barrier to overcome unless you are very good or the area of job is in high demand and there is a shortage (eg: Nursing / etc).

                      • -1 vote

                        @burningrage:

                        To be honest, the original intent was international students are supposed to go back and they would have had an edge against their own locals as they have overseas degree but as you can seeā€¦ life in OZ is too good to pass for some.

                        Yeah precisely this. I'm not saying it's easy being an international student - I have a lot of friends who were international students including many who weren't able to stay and it's a hard life (unless their family was extremely rich).

                        But unfortunately life is hard - there's no "easy" switch. Otherwise everyone would flip it. If you're good (sometimes you have to be really good), then life is easier. If you work harder (sometimes very very hard), then you get what you want. But nothing's a guarantee.


                        Edit: Just to clarify - I do sympathise with OP, I just don't think the recruitment company has necessarily done anything wrong (yet).

                        • +1 vote

                          @HighAndDry: I think the objections are coming up because you're calling anyone who struggles to get an internship in a foreign country without experience, I quote, an incompetent worker.

                          If you said something like "I don't think Australia should be allowing anyone but the very best" as opposed to insulting anyone you don't deem good enough, I'm sure you'd have less objections…

                          Your comments about this actual situation make sense and I fully agree with them - if they don't like the terms they shouldn't have agreed to them.

        • +1 vote

          I'm not an international student so unfortunately can't really comment on whether they're owed it or not. But I do feel its still a major reason why

          would you pay a recruitment company?

          And why many of these recruitment companies exist (to take advantage of that situation).

          •  

            @trustnoone: Oh these companies definitely do exist because of this reason. But unless they're actually defrauding people like OP (e.g. fake interviews), I don't see that they're doing anything wrong.

            There's a demand for internship placements, these companies help people get these internship placements. They're just filling a demand. No different than any other business, other than the fact that many people want PR and a job here much more than they want other goods or services, and so are likewise willing to pay more for a better chance at it.

            It's the same as tutoring. Especially at a college level, if you don't pass a course you might not get a degree - I don't think anyone thinks there are any issues with private uni tutors.

          • +2 votes

            @trustnoone:

            recruitment companies exist (to take advantage of that situation).

            Some people have back injuries.

            Chiropractors exist.

            Same same.

            •  

              @tshow: Yeah I really didn't explain myself well there at all, my bad. When I said:

              And why many of these recruitment companies exist

              What I mean by "these recruitment companies" is that when I went to uni I saw a few 'scam looking ones' that looked like they jump on international students by advertising as if they'll get you an internship for money, its not until you look further you find out they just work as a 'helper' they then do some dodgy interview where there was little to no chance of them being hired (say a "video interview") and pocketing the money as services rendered (or at least part of it) (no idea if this is one of them).

              I didn't meant to mean all recruitment companies are bad at all, there are some that are great, I definitely mis-spoke (mis-typed?) my meaning there.

              I also am not trying to say that the scam ones are bad (though to be fair I did heavily imply it haha) good or bad was not meant to be the point of the comment, the point of the comment is that there is a reason why people are paying for recruitment companies (which was the question the initial person asked.).

              •  

                @trustnoone: Fair enough. So my comparison isn't suitable since not all recruitment agencies are scams.

                I have a relative who goes through these agencies and he seems to be getting a payrise everytime the agency finds him a new role.

                I guess they'd only be in touch if they have an upgrade for him.

                The agency bills the employer.

                •  

                  @tshow: haha yeah, definitely.

                  As you say, a proper recruitment agency works for the person, they try to find the best fit for them and better roles as it helps the person and the agency.

                  The thing I'm talking about I feel is different, you almost can't call them a /recruitment/ agency. Since most companies typically don't give money for internships the agency doesn't get anything out of it. An internship is also short (12 wks to 6 months), so you don't have the person for long. Its more of a grab money up front and go scheme.

      • +1 vote

        That leaves a lot of international students essentially ready to pay just for a way into an internship which companies like this can take advantage of for $$$

        I didn't go through uni (so I don't know), but I would've expected that issues around the lack of placements would arise all the time and the universities would have a list/number of companies who are willing to accept students in the internship programmes in exchange for the "free employee" for those few months.

        Is there no such thing?

        • +1 vote

          Except for medical degrees, from my understanding no (or at least I went to two unis and neither did it) as you say though, it would make a whole heap of sense, especially as its a condition of the degree to have it and you get a free employee.

          The closest I've heard is someone having a list of places that have previously done internships before, but you still have to apply/interview/CV for it.

          •  

            @trustnoone: Thanks for the information.

            That would be pretty bad to not be able to graduate because you can't find an internship placement. I'm guessing there'd be quite a few people each every time this happens.

            Are there any other options for people who can't find placements?

            Imagine that.. paying thousands to someone to get a "job" that pays a $0.00 salary!

        •  

          It takes a lot of time to train someone to do anything useful and they usually need a lot of support - taking people getting paid decently away from their job and not achieving much. So often a net loss of productivity, unless you have them doing drudge tasks like stapling papers or fetching coffee, but then that's a bit useless to the student who wants to get actual useful experience.

          • +1 vote

            @Quantumcat: I agree that it takes time to train someone up. I regularly have interns shadowing me and I've found that they are usually quite keen to learn and they do learn pretty quickly. This is compared to when we hire an "experienced" person who often comes with "baggage and experiences" (good and bad) from other companies. I have plenty of time for people who are keen to learn. I was given the opportunity at a younger age when I had no qualifications/experience and I do like to give it back to others. I think there's a lot of jobs that people can do pretty well, but a lot of it comes down to whether they're given the opportunity or not.

            While it does take away some of my own time upfront, those 12 weeks or so gives us a good amount of time to get to know the intern and whether they'll be a good fit for the company (and vice versa) to keep them on afterwards.

            I'm in financial services and speaking from my own experiences - I can't speak for other industries.

        • +1 vote

          Engineer here - 12 weeks work experience required and it's up to the students to find it; uni didn't provide assistance. Wasn't so bad during busier times, but during the recent downturn there was a surge of students unable to complete their degree as they couldn't get work placement. Even free "workers" need supervision/insurance/etc. and workplaces cut back to the absolute minimum when it's slow.

          More and more degrees seem to require work placement, but I'm not seeing unis do much to help apart from medicine and teaching. And at some unis it's even limited in those roles too.

          So I'm not surprised recruitment agencies are doing this; if someone gets desperate as without the experience their degree would be wasted, there'll always be someone ready to take advantage.

          •  

            @savage bargain:

            ..uni didn't provide assistance. Wasn't so bad during busier times, but during the recent downturn there was a surge of students unable to complete their degree as they couldn't get work placement…

            That sounds pretty bad - I do understand that they're considered "adults" and should be able to arrange things themselves, but I would've expected that the uni would provide some sort of assistance. I wonder how many students end up being stuck in limbo because they're unable to get that intern experience.

            • +1 vote

              @bobbified: Yep. It wasn't like I was at some dodgy uni too… It was top of the state at the time.

              I would have expected the same if they're requiring that as a prerequisite; like at least they need tp check there'll be enough spots for the students if the work experience is going to be upheld.

      •  

        BRB, starting up a recruitment company specialising in international students, with $1000 upfront fees.

    •  

      Lot of students get desperate to get internships these days. As every grad job requires experience even to have a chance of getting a position

    •  

      Haha yea, never pay a recruitment company.

      My favourite saying is, when a man with wisdom meets a man with money, the man with wisdom leaves with the money and the man with money leaves wih the wisdom.

    •  

      Asian immigrants are desperate for jobs and will pay for internships. All they want is to get PR. They will even agree to work for free for a few years to get it.

      If you can imagine that this is driving down wages and conditions for Australian workers… yes. Yes it is.

  • +6 votes

    As you are based in Melbourne, you should also consider contacting Consumer Affairs Victoria.

    CAV are more likely to be active in resolving individual disputes if there are reasonable grounds to do so. The ACCC is more of a watchdog - they generally don't act in individual circumstances, but if there are sufficient complaints raised against a businesses/company, they make take direct action against the business itself (which does not necessarily mean you get the outcome you are after).

    Link here: https://www.consumer.vic.gov.au/contact-us/resolve-your-prob...

    • +1 vote

      thank you, i submitted a report.

    • -2 votes

      I don't see any issues here. OP signed a Contract that says:

      "I'll pay you money for an interview and a chance for a job, and if after 10 weeks I haven't gotten the job I'll get a partial refund."

      The company has held up its side of the deal so far.

      •  

        Yep, sadly I have to agree. They are scum and preying on the vulnerable. But they are currently well within their legal rights as the OP signed up to being screwed in this way.

      • +1 vote

        So HighAndDry, does that mean you have a problem with the New South Wales government who explicitly banned the practice of charging fees to job seekers? Or are you just a huge fan of unlawful enterprises?

        https://www.fairtrading.nsw.gov.au/trades-and-businesses/bus...

        These fees are not just and many places in the world have outlawed them.

        • -1 vote

          does that mean you have a problem with the New South Wales government

          Who in their right mind doesn't have one problem or another with how the government does things?

          I personally don't care unless they're forcing anyone to pay.

          These fees are not just

          By what reason? And no - "because people said so" isn't a valid one.

  • +24 votes

    Never ever ever pay for a job interview.

    • +3 votes

      Mate, people pay for less these days.

      People pay for someone else to write their resume.

      •  

        People pay for someone else to write their university assignments.

        Probably the same type of people.

      •  

        Paid resume writing, although bizarre, is at least some sort of service with some tangible result.

      •  

        Not the worst thing to do if the writer knows the industry or the mind of the recruitment officer.

        I was considering paying for one as a form of self review but given my roles (account management/BD) if I can't make my own CV stand out, I'm bad at my job.

        I imagine it's a good service for those savants who are excellent from a technical pov but cannot sell themselves well in the application process.

  • +8 votes

    Are you certain the interview was legit?

    •  

      that was an automated online interview. i didnt interview with an actual person.

      • +28 votes

        Thank you for being honest. That sounds really dodgy.

        •  

          their google reviews say it all actually. Their contracts are even unlawful in the first place. having to agree to that contract doesnt have to mean we are bound to be scammed i believe.

      • +13 votes

        Looks to be an elaborate scam. I would get in contact with H & R Block and ask if they have any business agreements with this recruitment company.

        "Automated online interview" that might have not been from H & R Block would've been a dead giveaway and you should've reported this to the credit card company which would have further solidified your claim to get your money back.

        Hope all goes well in trying to get your money back mate.

        • +6 votes

          I agree with this actually - it may well be a total scam, not just "omg I overpaid because they promised an interview and I didn't get the job".

          Ask H&R Block - and if they say there's no such agreement, OP can go to his credit card company much better equipped for a chargeback claim.

  • +3 votes

    My claim has been rejected because I was told my credit card company that I changed my mind hence I am not eligible for a refund.

    What does this mean? Did YOU tell them that you changed your mind? If so, then isn't that your own problem then? Is there evidence you changed your mind? If not, appeal the chargeback rejection with your CC company.

    •  

      Mate i asked for a refund because they werent providing me any service that they promised. I emailed them. i was asked by cc company if i attempted for a refund with the company initially and i said yes. CC company interpreted that i have changed my mind and i didnt want the service. on the contrary, they werent providing me the service.

      • -5 votes

        Mate i asked for a refund because they werent providing me any service that they promised.

        Seems like their service was to get you an interview. YOU bombed that interview. As long as that interview was legit (and not fake), they provided their service. Contract says you get a partial refund after 10 weeks - you agreed to that contract, why are you trying to change it now?

        • +2 votes

          i paid the full amount including internship which was the second payment option. Even if i fail the interview i am qualifying for the refund. how I did in the interview is regardless.

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