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Gigabyte Nvidia GeForce RTX 2060 OC 6GB $471.20 Delivered @ Futu Online eBay

470
PROGRAM20

Powered by GeForce RTX™ 2060
Integrated with 6GB GDDR6 192-bit memory interface
WINDFORCE 2X Cooling System with alternate spinning fans
90mm unique blade fans
Protection Back Plate
Core Clock: 1755 MHz (Reference Card: 1680 MHz)

Possible free game via redemption. Buy GeForce RTX 2070 or RTX 2060 and Choose 1 FREE Game: Anthem OR Battlefield V OR Metro Exodus..

Promotion valid for purchases made between March 5th, 2019 through April 4th, 2019 while supplies last. HERE

Original PROGRAM20 20% off Selected Sellers on eBay Deal Post

Thanks to Dienk with free cable at the same price. Gigabyte NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 OC GDDR6 6GB Ver2 Gaming Graphics Video Card

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closed Comments

  • +3 votes

    I've been planning on shifting to a 1660 to lower power usage, but when the 2060 OC is only $100 more and barely uses more power, I don't really see the point.

    Cheers OP.

  •  

    Was going to pick up a 2nd hand 1080… struggling to decide whether this would be the better long term investment with dx future updates and games etc

    • -3 votes

      Stick with the 1080 or even a 1080ti if you can get it for the right price dx stuff is a gimmick as is ray tracing etc

      • +2 votes

        Used 1080 ti are still overpriced online ( 700 or over).

        • +2 votes

          Ya…1080 Ti goes for $700-850 on eBay. It's not a bad purchase considering it performs just 10% short of an RTX 2080.
          Discounted prices usually slots the cards like so:
          RTX 2070 - $650-700 for unbinned chips and $700-750 for binned chips
          RTX 2080 - $950-1000 for unbinned chips (sometimes binned chips with bad cooling like the Inno3D OC3 card) and $1000-1100 for binned chips

          So a Ti slots in quite well between the 2070 and 2080. You give up the gimmick of ray tracing and DLSS for pure performance close to the 2080 for pricing closer to the 2070. Just find a card that has ~2 year warranty or so (beyond February 2018 purchase = post crypto crash purchase), seems the 10 series is more reliable anyway.

    •  

      This is slotted between the 1070 Ti/1080 where the real step up is the RTX 2070 which provides slightly more performance but for 40% higher cost. Used 1080s are currently going for $550 or more on eBay (quite absurd tbh), so this easily trumps it.

      Here's a German meta-analysis(just have a look at tables for the resolution you want to play at FHD=1080p, WQHD=1440p,UltraHD=4k):

      https://www.3dcenter.org/artikel/launch-analyse-nvidia-gefor...
      https://www.3dcenter.org/artikel/launch-analyse-nvidia-gefor...

    •  

      Don't get a second hand 1080, the 2060 is faster on some games that a 1070, so you wouldn't be giving up much at all in terms of frame rates, and you would have a current card with full warranty and less power draw, less heat etc.

  • +3 votes

    I pulled the trigger on the MSI 2060 at $494 last week. Wanted this one more but it was $513 at the times. Screw you OzBargain!

    In other news the card performs really well and was a great choice for an upgrade over my aging 970. I would have got a 1080 but they are so overpriced and buying second hand is a bit dodgy as so many were used for mining.

    • +1 vote

      I’d take a mining card over one used for gaming anyday.

      Mining cards are generally looked after, kept clean, run at constant fan rates and clock speeds at reduced power so you won’t get solder degradation. Unlike in gaming cards where the fans and speeds and power draw fluctuate and the heat fluctuates constantly causing solder degradation.

      • +1 vote

        Interesting take. I'd always read/heard to avoid at all costs as they are just run constantly

        • +2 votes

          Heat fluctuation is worse than running at a constant temperature, a heat variations causes materials to expand and contract causing micro fractures and then eventually larger fractures.

          Gaming has the high - low temperature swing going regularly, often running overclocked too. While mining cards typically run 24/7 but at a constant temperature and often undervolted to run more power efficiently.

          There are no guarantees though, a gaming card could barely be used, undervolted and be well looked after, while a miner might not care for optimum results and not run 24/7, could overclock the GPU, and never clean out the dust.

        • +2 votes

          They are; but the thermal load stays constant which is better than temperature fluctuations from on/off cycles and power draw changes.
          Similar to how a car with high highway km’s is probably in better shape than a car with low stop start city km’s

          It’s the reason why some people have to bake faulty PCBs in an oven coz constant heat cycling causes the solder to degrade. Being on all the time isn’t really an issue

          Bought 4 1080ti’s from a dedicated miner for my machine learning rig. Definitely preferred this over some gpu pulled out of someone’s gaming PC. Atleast I could see the logs of how the cards were run.

    •  

      True. I was tired of looking for 1080 or 1080 ti as well and were so overpriced. No point if getting those.
      How is your experience after upgrading from 970 to 2060? I have same card and can still play most of game on medium settings. I only upgraded my 4th gen PC to Ryzen 2700x and was looking for a AMD card with free Sync.
      If prices are good like that for Nvidea, I might have to rethink my decision.

  • +2 votes

    Thanks. Pulled my devil trigger.

  •  

    I grabbed a 2060 not long after launch for a VR PC. From the benches I have done its not far off the 1080 in my gaming rig. That being said i haven't even touched the RTX stuff yet.

    Gaming Rig i7 7700k @ 4ghz GTX1080
    VR PC i5 3500 something i got of ebay @ about 3.4 ghz RTX2060

    Superposition scores were within 400

    To me this is a pretty good deal not to sure how much a 1660 is going for but if its within $100 of the 2060 and your budget allows I would go for this.

  • -3 votes

    Lets build a pc -

    Gigabyte Auros 2070 8G - $647
    Apexgaming Hermes Mid Tower E-ATX Computer Case RGB Tempered Glass - $115
    - Never heard of these cases before
    2 x G.Skill Ripjaws V 16GB 1x16GB DDR4 3200MHz CL16 Gaming Desktop Memory $356
    Gigabyte Intel Z390 AORUS PRO WIFI - $303
    Seagate IronWolf 8TB- $300
    Samsung 970 EVO PLUS 500GB M.2 NVMe - $168
    Corsair Hydro Series H100i RGB LED Platinum 240MM Liquid CPU Cooler - $176
    Intel Core i9 9900K Processor 16MB 3.6GHz - $767
    Corsair RM850x (2018) 850W 80 Plus Gold Fully Modular ATX Power Supply Unit PSU - $180

    Spec Brief : 9900K - 32GB 3200Mhz - 2070 - 500Gb M.2 - 8TB Sata - Liquid Cooling - 850W Gold Modular - $3012

    The actual total was $3766. The max discount I was getting was $300 - perhaps splitting the transaction can give you the full discount

  • +1 vote

    Would it be worth selling my gtx 1070 to buy this?

    I'm looking at benchmarks and it looks like it's a 10-15% increase in performance overall

    •  

      Yeah, it sits between a 1070 and a 1080 performance wise, so you won't really see a big noticeable difference in frame rates, but you get a new card, with fresh warranty that runs cooler and quieter and uses less power. So it depends how much you get for the 1070 I guess.

    •  

      What resolution do you play at and what games?

      You might be able to sell your GTX 1070 for $330. List your card during the weekends on eBay so selling cost is $1. Less shipping costs of $15 and you'd recoup $314. So your net cost would be $157.

  •  

    I have a dilemma bewtween this card and a 1660Ti for $383. 1660Ti benchmarks, obviously, show lightly lower performance but a ~$100 difference…

    • +1 vote

      Personally I'd spend the $100 and get the 2060, you can OC the 2060 and it will still run quieter and cooler than a stock 1660Ti.

      •  

        Thanks for the response.

        $100 are not a big problem, my concern is that my old i5 7400 CPU might be a bottleneck for the 2060 card (as you said above, it sits between a 1070 and a 1080) like it's described, for example, here https://www.techspot.com/article/1496-pairing-cpu-and-gpu-bo...

        • +1 vote

          I wouldn't worry about it, looking at that article you only notice it with the GTX 1080, which the 2060 approaches, but doesn't run at. Secondly, it only noticeable when the fps is already high, such games like Overwatch which on the i7 7700k / 1080 pairing runs at 254 fps while the i5 7400 / 1080 pairing is 206 fps, so the discrepancy seems high, but it is still over 200fps, which is great. When you compare them on the Witcher 3 though, both those systems run at 87 fps, obviously the 1080 is the limiting factor there, and games are getting more graphically demanding.

          So think of it like this, you get to push games to ultra graphics settings with the 2060 and run at over 60fps at 1080p.

          • +1 vote

            @FabMan: Just to piggy back off this (because I couldn't find a conclusive answer):

            Would I be correct in saying: high graphics settings is more GPU dependent vs high frame rates which requires the CPU to do some heavy lifting too?

            For context: I recently got a 144Hz 1440P monitor for Overwatch and am fluctuating between 70-100fps with GPU at 100% and CPU at 70%(ish). Upgrading will definitely increase that but I suspect I can save money (RX 580) if my CPU is going to cap out anyway (not planning to upgrade mobo, cpu and ram any time soon).

            Other games I play are more indie/older so not too concerned about raw graphic output.

            • +1 vote

              @williewuboy: Yes, that is an easy way to consider it. A CPU is required to render each frame, and that whole Mantle / DirectX 12 improving CPU performance was specifically around that area.

              Increasing texture quality in a game has minimal effect on a CPU as there are no new objects to calculate, increasing the viewing distance or field of view would hit both the GPU and CPU as there are now more objects on screen to call the draw cell, and physics effects typically hit CPU's really hard unless PhysX is being used instead.

              As to how Overwatch will perform, I don't know. Some games favour AMD or NVidia GPU's, and at higher resolutions you hit the GPU harder than at 1080p in the above chart. 1440p has 1.77 more pixels to render than 1080p, so that is a significant GPU hit.

        • +1 vote

          I didn't think a i5 7400 was really that old.

  • +1 vote

    Got this 2060, it's great!

  • +1 vote

    I would recommend double checking the model before buying. It appears this 2060 comes with a much lower quality cooler and a PLASTIC back plate!!! I'm assuming this card would run pretty hot!!!! Looks like this might be one of the very budget gigabyte variants.

    •  

      Yes there's something fishy going on. The ebay seller here has "Gaming" in the listing title, but this card is not the "Gaming" version, it's the less powerful version of the 2060. An example of the Gaming model is here, notice it has 3 fans (and a faster core clock): https://www.ebay.com.au/itm/Gigabyte-RTX2060-6GB-Gaming-PCIe...

      I don't think you're right about the plastic back plate however. The Gigabyte website clearly states the 2060 has a metal plate.

  •  

    I need to upgrade for Xplane and my GTX 960 2GB is not cutting it. I really need to upgrade but I'm too miserly to spend $470. I don't know what to do please help. Will these be going sub $400 in the next few months?