expired Huggies Ultra Dry Nappies 1 Month Supply (for Boys/Girls in Various Size & Counts) $44.99 + Shipping / $0 with Prime @ Amazon au

650

got email from Camelx3..

Normal price around $55 + delivery or free with prime/$49 spend…

Boys or girls & looks like all sizes (quick check using phone)

Edit: don't forget ur cashback!

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Comments

  • +2 votes

    1 month supply

    Wouldn't have been for my kids.

  • +1 vote

    This is equivilent of about $23 for the standard Woolies packs, which is cheap but not unheard of. Still worth getting if you have Prime.

    •  

      Yep. I bought two packs. Woolies/Coles usually drop to around $25

      •  

        I wanted to get two, but we're about to move out of size two, don't want to get stuck with too much of a size like I did last size change!

        • +1 vote

          Go 2x size 3…

        • +1 vote

          My local Woollies was okay to take back the smaller size and swap it for a bigger size (provided they were at the same price). It's a bit trickier with Amazon.

          I wouldn't 'overstock', as your kids do grow quickly.

          We liked the ultimates (back when they weren't unisex).

          I'm sort of doubtful about the newer ultimates (had leaks) plus the ultradry (poo smell seems to seep through and you have to change your kids clothes - even if you change the nappy quickly). The unisex huggies seem to leak urine more often (we never had leaks with the ultimates). The ultimates seem to have more absorbent padding and 'puff' up when full, but not leak. The newer ones seem to have less fill in general. It depends if your (boy for us) rolls around and ends up in a spot where the urine will pool and overfill/leak out.

          We have been to South Korea (about two months over a three month period) and South Africa (two months over a three month period) and bought different versions of the "new" unisex huggies. I'm guessing the South Korean were made in the Korean factory and the from memory, the South African ones were made in either UK or South Africa (not China). We also tried different brands in Korea and they were all thing and seem to make the clothes absorb poo smell…

          The nappies seem to have less padding near when the tabs are, so our son seems to get more red welts around where the tabs/belt bits are. Also tried the pull-up pants, similar leakage and welt problems. We've gone up and down sizes, etc. He never had problems with the older ultimates. We haven't had them 'explode' and fall apart (yet).

          Our son never had nappy rash/diaper rash with the ultimates. He only had nappy rash when he had gastro and pooped a lot (usually after going to daycare)… Though, we did moisturize him after every change downstairs. We had a nanny (before daycare) said it was surprising, as she worked at day care and a lot them had terrible nappy rash and it was hard to change and clean them.

          The best nappies were were the older, non-unisex ultimates - ymmv.

          •  

            @jimbo jones: When I lived in South Korea a couple of years ago we brought nappies over with us. None of the brands there are any good.

            Some people had some success with the Cosco branded ones (American usually, no idea where they made them), but they were rubbish for us.

            Huggies are not as good as they used to be, but still the best we've been able to get…

  • +2 votes

    Buy now, think later, make babies later

  •  

    Looks like they priced match Costco.

  •  

    What's the effective difference between the Ultra Dry and the Ultimate? The Ultra Dry is significantly cheaper.

    • +1 vote

      The Ultimate is better for newborns or kids with sensitive skin or nappy rash, in my experience.

    •  

      The only difference is ultimate has a aloe vera and vitamin e layer, otherwise it's the same nappy.

    •  

      I think when I looked it seemed to be a sneaky way of slipping in imported product with less of an outcry than straight out moving production offshore.

      I may be remembering incorrectly. Can anyone confirm?

  •  

    Hopefully we can get an increased CR

  •  

    50 cents cheaper at costco

  •  

    Cheap but they usually come down to $39.99 a box, and I've seen them at $29.99 a box.

  •  

    I bought these on the weekend by accident for our bub. My Wife is going to return them because apparently, they can cause a nasty skin reaction.. this information has been circulating around parenting pages in social media. The Ultimate ones are meant to be better.

  •  

    $39.99 was my last price, this is too expensive

  •  

    Same price at Costco

  •  

    Last chance for the parents-to-be to stock up as Huggies won't be made in Oz anymore.

    •  

      Yup. Likely I won't buy them anymore once it's moved to offshore.

      I support local manufacturing and also quality products from local establishments where possible.

      Especially nappies it's pretty much essential to any young family.

      I don't mind paying more for better quality whilst keeping people employed. It is unfortunate they offshoring.

      I won't support huggies any more

      They should expect a drop in sales as people move to use Aldi and other brands

      Only ever used huggies due to made local and kept kids dry overnight

  •  

    It’s ok price - approx 28 cents per nappy at size 4. We have recently started buying nappy pants though which works well for our daughter (toddler). Paid $8.50 for 29 nappy pants, 29 cents each.

    •  

      Is there a reason to choose nappy pants over nappies? Bought some of the new Mickey ultradry nappies and they just don't seem to fit well and seem thinner than the old ones?

      My friend recommended Baby Love nappies…so deciding what to go for!

      •  

        The pants are for when u start potty training… Otherwise just stick with the normal's IMO…

      •  

        We tried baby love but weren’t happy with its quality so decided to stick with Huggies.

        Pants tend to (at least for us) hold the poop quite well for active toddlers and is more easy to put on. But the downside is that applying Sudo cream is a bit harder on pants. Try a small 25-30 pack of nappy pants first and see if it works for you.

  •  

    Might have something to do the Sydney Kimberly-Clark plant shutting down and moving to China.

    •  

      maybe not, camel shows that late last year (December) they were around $40..

      See here

    •  

      What can you conclude about a country that can't make its own essentials? Shortage of demand or excess of greed?

      •  

        Demand will always be there..

        I'd say the latter..

        The Poli's are the root of the issue IMHO, they're too worried about lining their own pockets rather than the well being of our wonderful country we call 'Australia'… Same goes for the CEO's…

        Think about the last 5 yrs we have had wot, 6 PM's? all receiving their own life-long payout of however many $100,000's/year, that's a disgrace in itself, you would think there would be a clause in the constitution that they have to at least sit a full term for the entitlement..

        /rant over..

  • +2 votes

    Surprised not to see anyone mentioning comparisons or suggestions of using cloth nappies - our 10month old is super happy in cloth ones, and we use disposables as a backup plan only now. I'd recommend giving them a go, if anyone has considered!

    Aside from that, having bought our fair share of disposable in the past though, these Huggies are a good deal for the price ;)

    •  

      Landfilling is easier than washing. Poo, yuk!

      • +2 votes

        not sure how much you've looked in to it - but i understand your opinion.
        I am not a fan of nappy changing, at all. However, with some very basic preparation, it is very easy to dispose of poo entirely separately to the nappy.
        Anyway, each to their own, of course. Spking for myself, the small amount of extra work needed to save massive amount of disposable nappy landfill is definitely worth it. Multiple benefits - environmental and smaller cost the big ones for me.

        • +1 vote

          agree. We went disposable with our first kid because we had a lot to think about and we were both working full time when she was born. Second kid we both had leave, so plenty of time - we went back to the 80's cloth nappies. They're a lot better - comfort, cost, less nappy rash etc. The peapods pilcher nappy covers make them the same as modern cloth nappies anyway. Rarely have to "wash poo", and you can have bamboo liners inside them. The amount of nappies a newborn goes through, and the amount you throw away just with a single small amount of wee, makes cloth nappies a no brainer economically - and then there's the environmental factor on top of that.

      •  

        Washing also needs detergent washing powder power water….so its also not environmental friendly

  •  

    deal has expired, too bad

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