Insurance claim for TV with water damage

My TV sits below an airconditioner that leaked a heap of water into it (vents at the top of the tv) the tv's picture went blank for a couple of days whilst it still did turn on and then started working again. There are some dead pixels and discolouration near the border of the tv and also a line that runs top to bottom that is very noticable when displaying lighter colours.

Im in a rental property and the owner has accepted responsibility as the airconditioner was poorly installed with the water run off not installed with enough drop which resulted in water backing up and out the front of the unit. This has since been rectified.

I was wondering if anyone knew what the insurance company would likely pay out for something like this? the tv was about 2 years old when it happened.

The rrp was $5899 (samsung website) - i paid about $3500 -

Model Samsung UA65JS9000

I contacted a Samsung authorised repair centre and they said that water damage is non repairable so guess its a total loss?

thanks

Comments

  • +3 votes

    hmmm, ask OzBargain OR the insurance company?

    •  

      thanks for the reply, its not my insurance company to call as its via the land lord… just trying to get an idea so i know what i can look for to replace.

      • +1 vote

        Step 1. Check with your contents insurance.
        Step 2. Ask landlord for $$, since he accepted responsibility. (You break it, you fix it)
        Step 3. If all failed, buy new TV with your own money.

        •  

          i actually started this thread whilst on hold to my insurance company… after 20 mins i gave up waiting and i was hoping someone might actually have had experience with how insurance companies come up with the dollar pay out amount? Or even a rough guess?!

          My landlord has accepted responsibility so no problems there.

      • +1 vote

        No, it's contents so it's your insurance. Make a claim, if valid your insurer will recover from the landlord (and their insurer).

        Do note, it is unlikely you will get $3500, the insurer is only obligated to provide a like-for-like, not a dollar-for-dollar replacement.

  •  

    You put a $3,500 TV under an aircon?

    Lordy…

    Good luck with that claim. I'm not sure if your landlord's insurance covers tenant contents nor if it covers negligence.

    •  

      thanks for your reply, my land lord insurance on my properties does cover "escape of liquid" including contents damaged as a result.
      Im not sure what you mean by negligence? This was a result of a poorly installed air conditioner drain pipe, that has since been fixed (water doesn't leak anymore)

      • +3 votes

        I thought it was common knowledge to never put anything that is moisture sensitive under an aircon.

        Even the best installations will eventually fail. All it takes is a bit of water and you've got a lot of damage.

        I wish you all the best with your claim, I really do. There is a lesson here though - don't put anything moisture sensitive under something that will eventually fail.

        I've burnt an amp the same way. Lucky for me, it was $99. Cheap lesson. I've had a few bits of aircon water in a few properties since but never falling for that again.

        Ps. Should include a poll to see how many people have seen a drippy aircon. Genuinely curious.

    • +1 vote

      Genuine question, would placing your TV be considered negligent? I'm asking as I have never had an air conditioner that leaked in the 10 years since I've moved out of home. So, it would not occur to me to not place my TV below an air conditioner.

      •  

        All good, looks like you've pretty much responded to my question with your reply above!

      •  

        I'm actually not sure but seeing as how I wouldn't go a month without seeing a drippy aircon, be it at shopping mall, my office, supermarket, I think it is prudent to ensure if you do place it under an aircon that you have the opportunity to detect leaks and contain the water LONG before it drips onto the TV.

        (Sorry for long sentence.)

    • +3 votes

      You put a $3,500 TV under an aircon?

      Normal for living room config, places AC above TV, blowing straight to couch.

      AC weren't supposed to leak. Same as watercooling for PC.

      • -1 vote

        Operative word is supposed.

        Everything fails. I'd have a layer of protection for that failure so I always have a cabinet built over the top of the TV with just enough lip so any runoff is not going to short the TV.

  •  

    quick google, found https://www.pselectronic.com.au/shop/tv-video/lcd-tv/samsung... so, you'd be lucky to get that much, i think maybe $1300-$1500

    •  

      is that how they generally do it? just like for like replacement cost? I cant believe anyone would still have stock of this model!

      • +1 vote

        i know with insurance for cars, if you get written off and you can prove that the value is worth more than they are offering, you can get a higher payout. So your 2012 Toyota Camry is (in the insurance companies eyes worth $3000 for example) but if you go to carsales and theres comparable models worth $6000, you can use this to negotiate

        •  

          would be hard to build a case for a tv being worth more i imagine… id be happy to replace it with the same model if that shop did have stock? thanks

          • +1 vote

            @wilko23: The rule for these things is to place you in the same position you would have been in before the incident but not to enrich you. So market value or replacement with the same model is what you'd expect to receive.

  • +1 vote

    You get paid out per the condition's of your insurance policy. This is typically new for old replacement. So in your case whatever the cost is to replace with a same spec TV.

    If you aren't claiming on your insurance then you are entitled to the current market value of the TV before it broke from the landlord or his insurance company.

    •  

      But what if you've got an ancient TV? eg a CRT or plasma?

      • +1 vote

        Through your own insurance they will try to match the TV as closely as possible. With CRT it should be a same size LCD.

        Market value would be very low for both so dont expect much in that case.

  • +1 vote

    So they ended up giving me a Samsung QLED Q90 65" - seems like a dream result to me!

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