Selling Car Hail Damaged but Fully Repaired by Insurance

Hi I am selling my car which was hail damaged but fully repaired by insurance. Do I need to disclose this fact
1. If trading into a dealer
2. If privately selling in the advertisement
3. If privately selling just verbally

Comments

  • +2 votes

    I sold a repaired hail damaged car (a few hundred of the smallest possible indentations) after the repair I couldn't see anything, looked absolutely perfect. But when informed two potential private purchasers of the repair they treated the car like it was going to give them herpes.

  • +4 votes

    If it is repaired, then what is there to disclose?

  •  

    Maybe ask a friend who doesn't know it has been damaged to look at it. See if they can tell.

  • +1 vote

    Run your own ppsr, costs $2, make sure it's clear.

    If trading it into the dealer, most contracts have a condition that your car hasn't been hail damaged and you need to sign off on it. Though any decent valuer should stop repairwork

    How old is the car and how much are you selling it for? That can play a bigger part

  • +1 vote

    Will the vehicle's hail damage repair show up on a REVS?
    https://www.ppsr.gov.au/revs-check
    https://www.ppsr.gov.au/

  • +3 votes

    IMO if it has been repaired you don’t need to disclose previous damage or mechanical problems, but you shouldn’t conceal the fact if someone asks specifically. A repaired car is just a car, don’t advertise that it has been damaged it will cost you money.

  •  

    Tell 'em nothing if selling to a dealer - let then worry about it
    If selling privately then let your conscience be your guide.

  •  

    Your CX-5 sounds like a bad buy.

  • +1 vote

    It is a bit weird that a major accident which impacts the structural integrity of a car isn't an issue but cosmetic impact marks are. I think it is the old school cost of repairing hail hasn't worked thru insurance policy- these days most impact marks are pushed out with rods and no painting is required.

    One of my previous cars the neighbour backed his jeep into the side door. The car was screwed after that after repair - rattled and creaked. I am OCD but it wasn't like it was new. Was happy when it was sold at auction.

  •  

    As far as the industry is concerned (I think) if the car doesn’t appear as a write off on a check, then it shouldn’t be a problem, because technically the car has been repaired by a qualified panel beater.

    The same question would apply if the car had been in a major accident but had been fully repaired by the insurer; it’s not an issue for the seller, or the buyer, because it’s been repaired adequately.

    If someone asks you if it’s been in an accident, or if it’s ever been to a panel beater, I’m not sure where you stand, however from my perspective, the industry relies on cars being repaired so as far as your concerned, you should be sorted.

    Hope that helps. Good luck selling it, and for goodness sake good on you for actually asking the question rather than just assuming whatever the case may be someone else should pay for it.

    No, insurance has done their job, panel beaters have done their job, you should be right as rain I think.

  • +1 vote

    If you disclose it will affect your tradein price for pretty much 0 reason.

  •  

    https://www.insurancebusinessmag.com/au/news/breaking-news/h...

    https://www.choosi.com.au/blog/travel/hail-damaged-car-insur...

    Although it is possible to get registration for a damaged car that was previously a write-off, insurance companies may not be as keen.

    It may be difficult to find Comprehensive car insurance or even Third Party Fire and Theft for a hail-damaged car, and you should factor this in when you consider buying one. Some insurance companies won't offer these insurances at all, while others may, but at a price.

    It is likely that you will be offered Third Party Property for a hail-damaged car. This will exempt you from legal liability for any damage to other people's vehicles or property from an accident you cause, but it will not cover your own. If you're satisfied with this insurance, which is more cost-effective than Comprehensive car insurance and Third Party Fire and Theft, then it could be an option for you.

    • +4 votes

      What makes you think it was a write off exactly? It was repaired by the insurance company, so it's obviously not a write off.

  • +1 vote

    If it's been repaired and it's not a dodgy job then you don't have to say a word to anyone. It's up to the buyer to inspect the car and ensure they are satisfied with the condition and price offered.

  •  

    Just traded my 4.5 year old car in on a brand new one, trade in had a 15K accident repair done Feb 18.
    Came back as good as before and didn't tell sales guy.