Can I Freeze That?

Just come back from being away for 5 months and it's a pain coming home jet lagged and having to go to the shops when the freezer can save you a trip till your rested + I don't like wasting food so this could be a better way to save money.
I also bought food saver vacuum sealer years ago and has saved me a fortune this helps with freezing.

Frozen bread was ok
frozen cheese Vacuum sealed ok
didn't have milk to freeze but think would be ok.
Froze lemons before for fried fish = better than nothing

Just asking does anyone freeze funky stuff that's worth sharing most of us wouldn't of thought of before?

I just threw out an open jar of olives worth $4 thinking if I vacuum sealed and froze them would my friends think they taste OK before adding to a frozen pizza. Thinking now while I type, Well yes because frozen pizzas come with olives duh

Comments

  • +23 votes

    There's bargain hunting and then there's… this…

  • +1 vote

    I tried carrots but they went black. You can peel them, but they are still mushy. Don't bother. Leave it to the snap freezing specialists.

    •  

      I tried to blanch my own veggies years ago too it didn't last long

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      Most of the fruit and veggies will turn mushy after freezing, so they are not candidates for freezer because their cell structures get destroyed during freezing (water expand during freezing causing breakage of cell wall) , except for a few like berries which is already squishy.

  • +2 votes

    Frozen fresh ginger.

    • +1 vote

      When I harvest my ginger I peel and cut it into pieces, then store it in the fridge covered in sherry. The alcohol keeps it fine for ages, and once you finish the ginger you've got some supercharged ginger-sherry to use in cocktails.

      •  

        Nice! That's a good idea, the sherry would taste like rice wine in Asian cooking anyway.

        Do you need to keep it in the fridge?

        •  

          I just figure the fridge is a slightly safer spot. I'd expect the ~18% alcohol in sherry to keep most bad things at bay but why take the chance. The rice wine I've tasted in the past had nowhere near the flavour this sherry ends up with. Imagine you accidentally drank undiluted ginger cordial. I think it'd do quite well as an extra flavour in a mulled wine or similar.

      •  

        I've found ginger lasts over a month in my fridge. I used to wrap it up and it would go mouldy, instead, just leave it uncovered. Will slowly dry out but won't go off

    •  

      any surplus stuff i have i dry out and stick it in the blender to make powder

  • +11 votes

    A frozen pizza or something to deal with that day 1 jet-lag, then just go to the shops the next day for fresh stuff?

  • +2 votes

    Cheese is best frozen when grated.
    I buy chicken penne pasta from Aldi (reduced to $6.99) today or a tuna mornay from Woolworths. Divide each into four serves with spinach and freeze. Get four lunches out of each.
    Leftover passata and tomato paste (when a recipe calls for one tablespoon).
    Tomatoes can be frozen but only used in casseroles.
    Leftover curry, rice, slow cooker meals … put in single serve containers great for lunches or when tempted to buy takeaway. Can save a lot of money.

  • +2 votes

    Just remembered for Thai lovers for winter times. Fresh chilly and kaffir lime leaves in a zip lock bag no problems

  • +7 votes

    thought freezing bread was what most people did.

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      Especially in more humid areas, bread goes mouldy fast when left on the bench, and it goes stale in the fridge.

  • +4 votes

    Breast milk can be kept frozen for up to 12 months.I had some in my coffee the other day and it was alright : better than skim milk but not as good as the full-cream stuff. Also had some in pancakes once when hungover.

    • +15 votes

      'Bitty'…

    • +1 vote

      Milk from a different kind of cow.

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      Just to clarify, my toddler had already weaned himself off the stuff months before I found the frozen pouches of breastmilk in the freezer.

    •  

      So to be clear, you detected a less palatable flavour and texture emerging after 13 months..

      •  

        Nope. I had them well within the 12 months. My youngest went off breast milk the day he discovered the Laughing Cow "cheeeese, peeese!" :) It was quite sudden and we had a fair few frozen pouches left in the freezer.

        12 months is the maximum recommended time.The lipase, a naturally occurring enzyme that helps break down fat, can cause the milk to taste sour or soapy even after a couple of hours. We used the scalding method to keep it tasting 'fresh' for longer.

        P.s : Fresh is best whenever possible,obvs.

    • +2 votes

      I prefer my breast milk straight from the teet

      •  

        You and Jim 😂 I won't link to the clip from Me, Myself and Irene as some people might get offended but if you haven't seen that movie, go watch it.

    •  

      great protein for body builders too

      •  

        You got negged by a bub 😂. Rather than providing nutrition to a grown man, may I suggest that that person donate the extra milk to the milk bank?

        There are 5 milk banks across Australia. 4 are connected to the NICUs and only supply donated breastmilk to premature and sick hospitalised infants.Breast milk protects high risk infants against life threatening conditions such as neonatal sepsis (a dangerous, multi-system infection) and necrotising enterocolitis (a severe disease of the intestine).

        It has been estimated that using donor human milk will provide cost savings of $13 million per year to the Australian health care system just by reducing the number of necrotising enterocolitis cases alone.

        There are also informal milk donor networks on social media. These are usually used for bubs who are born via a surrogate, are adopted or fostered, or children of same-sex parents.

  • +10 votes

    Wet paint brushes, wrap in cling film then put in ziplock, Thaw and keep painting the next morning.

  • -1 vote

    There’s cheap then there is just stupid.

    I assume you don’t live alone, otherwise just Turn your freezer off.

  • +5 votes

    Couldn't you just have 2 mins noodles with a can of tuna? Or cereal with long life milk? That's what I would do.

    • +3 votes

      Or I dunno…. order takeaway?

      This is a one off - it's not a recurring expense - so why would you try and save $8 by leaving your freezer on for 2 months?

  • +4 votes

    deliverooooo
    ubereats

    woolies and coles deliveries, a few hours after u get home (order a few days before)

    long life products (long life milk, can soups)

  • +6 votes

    So… you want to know what meal you can make, freeze, and then eat 5 months later, because you're too tired to pop into the kebab shop down the road. Am I understanding that right?

  • +10 votes

    Do people not turn their fridge/freezer off when they're away for extended periods? Just clean it out before you go and save the electricity. Grab takeaway when you get back and go to the shops the next day.

    • +4 votes

      If you have a teenager's fridge it'll make sense but if you actually have stuff in there it's not worth the hassle to save $10-15 a month. Then again ozbargain, so maybe

    • +2 votes

      Power in Australia tends to be pretty reliable.

      In places where the power can go off for an extended period of time leading to melting and then re-freezing of what's in the freezer, a trick is to put a coin on top of an ice cube.

      If it's still on top then the food is OK to eat.

      •  

        Power is pretty reliable, can you say the same for your house circuit breaker? Mine trips at least a few times a year in Canberra. Had a friend who came home a few years back to a freezer full of rotten meat because the breaker tripped. He had to throw the freezer away as he just could not get rid of the smell.

        •  

          Mine used to trip up often and then I had my circuit breaker board upgraded and more breaker. Now no issues.

  • +2 votes

    We are but two so we, often, freeze leftovers for consumption later. Anything “stew” like freezes well. Then you just cook some rice, heat up “stew” and ready for quick meal. I peel, and freeze, bananas; they work well in smoothies. In summer I take the fruit from my sangria jug and freeze it into largish individual ice blocks. Gives me the option of a single glass of cold sangria with fruit when desired.

  •  

    I've julienned carrots and put them in a Tupperware container for years and then frozen them.. Always came out fine.. Saves me the hassle of chopping up carrots before I cook dinners.

    I've also cut up mangoes inro small cubes and frozen them.. No problems

  • +2 votes

    “Just asking does anyone freeze funky stuff that's worth sharing most of us wouldn't of thought of before?”

    Forgive me if I’m getting this wrong but I think this was more of the point of the OPs post rather than getting stuff out of the freezer after having been away for 5 months.

  •  

    I freeze everything with the vacuum sealer. KFC wicked wings are the best after you airfry it, they taste better than fresh. Boiled eggs have been the only thing that taste weird after freezing but everything else has been fine.

  • +1 vote

    Freeze funky stuff
    Hydration backpack bladder.
    Stores in the freezer ( without water) less effort then fully drying and prevents any funky growth
    Summer a nice cold towel

    Food wise
    The juice/fat from roast pork freeze in chunks for any gravy/fried rice between roasts
    Any really cheap supermarket clearance items. Google can I freeze… bought 10kg of ricotta at $1 /kg didn’t realise it could be frozen

  •  

    Dry our fresh ginger in the oven and store in a glass jar. Lasts up to 3 years.. not at my place as it gets used up fast.. rehydrates when thrown into hot water.

    plenty of hints on line how to snap freeze and store.. do you know if you had a power failure and everything got defrosted and refrozen again?

    When going away leave the freezer empty.

    • +2 votes

      There are a few tricks to tell if the freezer was off for a while as long as you set it up in advance, like freezing a jar half full of water, turn it upside down, then when you come back if the ice is at the bottom it has defrosted and refrozen.

  •  

    Don't freeze avocado. Texture is horrid. I learned a valuable lesson.

    • +1 vote

      Yes, you can. Here's how you do it :

      • Cut the ripe avocado in half, remove the seed and peel. You can dice the avocado or leave as half or quarter, depending on how you like to portion.

      • Sprinkle over some lemon or lime juice and place in either a zip-lock freezer bag, removing most of the air, or in a freezer-safe container.

      Frozen avocado can be used straight from the freezer to make smoothies.

      Or buy frozen avos from the freezer section of your supermarket.

      • +1 vote

        So removing the skin and seed and sprinkling lemon means the texture will remain smoothe rather than turning fibrous? I somehow doubt it, but, I haven't tried so I can't say this doesn't work.

    •  

      I freeze avocado, it's fine for sandwiches.

  • +2 votes

    Another overcomplicated ozb thread. It takes 15mins to goto the shops or just ubereats a meal. It's not like you're coming back from fighting a war. I should really stop reading this stuff. So much nonsense and lack of perspective out there.

    •  

      This.

      Its kind of like a really bad 1st world problems post…. but at least those might have a reason behind (I have no internet, etc). This has none of the redeeming qualities of those kind of posts (thats saying something).

    • +3 votes

      Nothing wrong with thinking 'man it would be nice to have some frozen food right now instead of having to order something.' The OP isn't catastrophising the situation or being over dramatic. Just prompted a thought about what kind of stuff they could leave in the freezer for a long time. Don't worry about it.

  •  

    It would probably be cheaper to run your food down before you leave and chuck the remainder out and turn your freezer off for the five months. A couple of days before you return you could do an online shop and collect it on the way home, it will only take five minutes to pick up. Alternatively you could just pick up a pizza or something.

  • +6 votes

    If you're away for 5 months, why have your fridge/freezer on?
    Sounds like a waste of money to me.

  •  

    I always shop online while I’m away and arrange for it to be delivered at the same time I expect to be home. Probably a disaster if your plane is delayed but it’s always worked out fine for me.

    • -1 vote

      If it's woolies they bump you back to a later slot that day or early day after timeslot. Coles just refund which is a pain. They have no way of organising redelivery apparently. I've had a bunch of delayed Cairns >adl flights and just give them a call as soon as I know I'll be late home.

  •  

    Can afford to go on a 5 month holiday overseas (hence the humble brag about jetlag) yet complains about wasting food and wanting to freeze things?
    The 5 months of freezer time is costing you money anyway.
    Its not that big of a deal to swing past the shops on the way home or after you get home and unpack a bit
    Run your food down before you travel as it sounds planned, not last minute or random travel.

  •  

    Vodka slushy

  • +1 vote

    all the "juice" left over from roasting chicken/beef/lamb/whatever, chuck it in a mason jar and freeze it. great for making gravy or adding heaps of flavour to stew/soup

    also used to blanch and blitz kale or chards/beets in the blender, then freeze. chuck it into a stew or bolognese, gives a great "greens" hit and also the kids wont realise they are eating it

  • +1 vote

    I would worry about the power going out at some point, long enough for the food to go bad then it comes back on. When you get home it's cold and you are none the wiser.

    Something I do is to freeze a small cup of water then place a coin on top. That way if the power goes out for an extended period of time, you will know as the ice will melt and the coin will move downwards. That way you'll know if the food might have gone bad.

  • +3 votes

    Apparently most households throw out 1/3 of their groceries because they go off before being consumed. I try my best to reduce that as much I can by freezing everything and use it when I need it.

    -Chicken wings, fillets
    -Beef mince, steaks, burger fillets
    -Pre marinated meats from the deli
    -Bread goes straight in the freezer
    -Aldi brioche buns (keep for when I feel like burgers)
    -Shredded ham (use for stir frys)
    -Salami slices ( freezes easily and seperated easy for sandwiches)
    -Shredded cheese bags
    -I put portions of tomato paste from a big bottle into ice cube trays then pop the cubes into a zip lock bag to use for cooking
    -Fresh squeezed lemon juice into ice trays as well, use in drinks and making lemon water
    -Freeze eggs in bigger ice cube trays end defrost when needed as a cooking ingredient. Doesn't work well to eat by itself.

    I also buy whatever frozen veggies that can be bought
    -Pre chopped onion (a life saver, haven't had to cut an onion in years)
    -Frozen peas, corn, edamame etc
    -Frozen mixed berries for smoothies
    -Frozen mashed potato (just throw in the microwave with some bitter and tastes amazing)

    Lots more i can't remember. Not everything freezes but I try most things and see what works.

  •  

    My wife and kids don't seem to like frozen bread, either defrosted or toasted. I can't tell the difference, but are there any tips about freezing bread? Not really sure how many different ways you could do this, though!

    • +1 vote

      We found if you freeze it whilst it is fresh, rather than waiting until it gets stale, it seems to work better. We also toast from frozen. Maybe use the toasted frozen stuff for scrambled eggs, soups, etc.

  • +1 vote

    Ever wonder why plastic milk jugs have those circle indents on the side? They are there to allow milk to expand while freezing

    If you don’t want to store flour in the freezer, you can freeze it for three days when you first bring it home to kill off any bacteria or critters trapped inside. EWWWW!!!!

    Freeze sauces in ice cube trays. Once frozen, pop the cubes out and put them in a freezer bag.
    The tip above is also great for things like canned tomato paste! Most recipes only call for a small amount of tomato paste, and then you’re left with an open can that’s nearly full. Freeze it instead!

    Squeeze lemon juice or lime juice into ice cube trays, then pop the cubes out after they have frozen and store them in freezer bags. Now you have “fresh” lemon and lime juice whenever you need it. And you never have to kick yourself for letting another bag of lemons from Costco go to waste! (Been there, done that.) And don’t forget to ZEST the lemons or limes first, and keep the zest in the freezer as well!

    Someone else has written an article here

    •  

      Ever wonder why plastic milk jugs have those circle indents on the side? They are there to allow milk to expand while freezing

      No they aren't.

      If you don’t want to store flour in the freezer, you can freeze it for three days when you first bring it home to kill off any bacteria or critters trapped inside. EWWWW!!!!

      Who stores flour in the freezer?
      When it warms up moisture can form so the flour can get wet and then have moisture in it causing it to go mouldy.

      Freezing anything will not kill bacteria, it just slows down it's reproduction.

  •  

    i've got a 500l chest freezer and freeze just about everything!

    • +1 vote

      Anyone seen granny lately?

      The problem with chest freezers are they are a pain to get things in and out of. I prefer my upfright freezer, even it if is less efficient.

      • +1 vote

        Anyone seen granny lately?

        sssh!

        The problem with chest freezers are they are a pain to get things in and out of

        yes, i do have trouble sometimes getting the stuff i want or even remembering what is in there and where it is located

        •  

          You've given me an idea. I should photograph what I put in the freezer and create a freezer database; that way I have a record of what is in there and when I put it in. I then just delete the picture as I take things out. If I have it on my phone then I can work out what I need when out shopping.

  •  

    I froze my partner. Will re-thaw in a few years.

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