My Penfolds Grange Hermitage Dilemma. Down the Sink. Drink Them. Or Try to Sell.

Starting about 40 years ago (yes I’m getting on in years), my ex wife used to buy me a Penfolds Grange Hermitage for my birthday every year. This happened for about 10 years, and then stopped when we divorced. So I had ten Grange Hermitage nicely stored in Melbourne.

I then decided to move to Brisbane and, soon after, went overseas with my work for quite a number of years. I decided to store my Granges with a friend. I eventually came back, collected my Granges, and discovered that they had been poorly stored. It makes me cry every time I think about it. And we laugh about it often. They had been stored in the shed, and some of the corks had partly come out of the bottle. So one night, we polished these off. Some were surprisingly good still.

This left me with five bottles, which I have stored to this day. Not well I may add. Some of them the level of wine has decreased. Some the labels have deteriorated a little. I doubt whether the wine is any good. But they are obviously Granges.

I have a photo if I knew how to paste a photo into this listing. LOL.
For interest. The vintages are 1979, 1982, 1984, 1985, 1987

Does anybody think there is a market for these bottles of Grange if I declare the history. And where should I go to maybe sell these. Selling them, if possible, is my preferred option.

Poll Options expired

  • 0
    A. Just Keep Them. Memories
  • 6
    B. Worthless. Thrown Them Down the Drain.
  • 9
    C. Try and Sell Them. Declare History.
  • 53
    D. Drink them.

Comments

  • +14 votes

    You could take it to a recorking clinic

    https://www.penfolds.com/en-au/events/recorking-clinics

    • +2 votes

      Run once every 2 years so OP will need to wait till the next year.

      Gut wrenching stuff I tell ya when they popped it open, pour some out, sniffed then tasted it and deliberating whether to certify it…

      The ones that were certified were spectacular, the borderline one….it was borderline and I did ended up with a bottle of vinegar too. That bottle was grouse.

    •  

      +1 from me. Hold on to them for now. Take them to the clinic. Ones that pass can be sold if you want - frequently there will be an auction group there who will make an offer there based on current market price (they act as agents for Penfolds, who buy them for their restaurant) - and the rest you can keep to drink at a bbq.

      •  

        Great idea. Kept them this long. A little longer will do no harm. Great excuse to attend and watch other people’s reactions at the clinic.

        • +1 vote

          Yeah - it's actually a fun event even if you're not a wine snob. It costs nothing (you need a bottle of Penfold red that matches the selection criteria, and you need to pre-book your spot), there's cheese/nibbles as well as tastings of the current wines. Watching the other people there is very interesting - from the couple with that one special bottle, to the collector with dozens in special cases. When you have your bottle(s) checked, you get to taste them yourself as well. Ones that pass get topped up with the same/similar wine (ie if it's a Grange, it gets topped up with ta recent Grange - if you have a lot of the same vintage you can choose to top up with one of your own bottles), are recorked and sealed, and a numbered label attached. Ideally those should be left to stand for a couple of weeks (to let the cork expand and seal properly), then laid down for a year or so before being drunk. Ones that don't pass get recorked but not topped up, and (if still drinkable) should be drunk within 6 months.

          Note that once checked at a clinic, they can't be checked again. If you are planning to sell rather than keep, the best time to sell is at the clinic or soon after.

  •  

    When you say poorly stored, do you mean lying down in a garage/cellar where they got dirty and the odd snail crawled over the labels.
    Or standing up in the cupboard above the fridge?

    If they were laid down so the corks didn’t dry out, they are likely ok. The recorking clinic would be the definitive way to find out.

    •  

      They we’re unfortunately stored by my friend in the garden shed, standing up. Just looking at the bottles today, four of them are in surprisingly good shape.

  •  

    Does anybody think they might appeal to a “collector” trying to complete their collection? And if so, where I should try and find this type of person. Unfortunately, against rules to advertise on Gumtree or eBay.

  • +10 votes

    Courier one to a state Premier.

  • +2 votes

    I believe you have to shoot them as target practice now.

  •  

    Sounds like you should've kept the wife and ditched the friend. We have a friend who was buying them, back in the day, when you could get them for $25 a bottle. We have been the happy recipients of his foresight on a few occassions.

  •  

    A friend of mine bought a bottle of Grange from a Bottleshop, unfortunately it had been kept on a top shelf that copped full sunlight for an hour or two each day, but he bought it anyway.
    He bought a Wine Fridge and lovingly stored the Grange for another 5 years. We finally opened it and YUK, it tasted like old wet dog mixed with vinegar!!!

    If you want to sell it on the InterNet you will need a Liquor Licence, so most people just List the 'Bottle' for sale and not what's in it (but I'm not certain if that is allowed anymore?).

    • +1 vote

      Nah you can flog them off through the likes of Langton's, Wickman and a couple of others.

      •  

        Thanks for your suggestion.

      • +1 vote

        I had the same dilemma a few years ago. Ended up selling them through MW Wines in Collingwood. For Granges there was no sellers commission. And the old caveat emptor applies, the buyer takes the risk that the wine may be off. I was delighted with the outcome

  •  

    Come to think of it, where's OP and anyone near OP has a Coravin? You could always use a Coravin to get some out to see if it's still good or destine for the sink.

  • +1 vote

    I had a 1972 Grange which I bought in a young and foolish moment. Had it for my 40th birthday after it living under the stairs for many years. A red like a delicious bulldozer.

    Sold the empty bottle on eBay for $55.

  •  

    Wine should be drunk and savoured, not kept and sold for a profit!

  •  

    You can try the Penfolds clinic, but be aware that if they fail they are worthless.

    Your other option is to sell them via a wine auction. I use MW Wines in Melbourne and the service is excellent. You can email them photos and they will give you honst advice and valuations.

    Of course you can always try drinking them… but don't expect much if they have been stored poorly for such a long time.

  •  

    Penfolds run workshops. they check your cork and re cork the wine.. get them to check the bottles next year.

    https://www.penfolds.com/en-au/events/recorking-clinics

  •  

    Not sure if you can edit the post but this is where it should have gone..

    URL/Link: *
    Do not upload a thumbnail. An image will be generated automatically from the link you provide. Only insert your own image into the URL/Link field when no direct link to the deal exists. Click Here to submit a picture or a PDF file.

  •  

    Thanks everybody for their input and recommendations.

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