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Gigabyte NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER GAMING OC - $783.20 + $15 Delivery (Free for eBay Plus Members) @ Futu Online eBay

200
POUNCE20

Futu again with the other 2070 Super. Costs a little more than the last one I posted but it can be overclocked a bit higher and handle heat a little more. I'd personally have bought this one myself but I don't believe they had it when I purchased (or I missed it somehow)

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Comments

  •  

    is the added cooling worth the extra $80-90 ??

    •  

      It's not just the extra cooling, it's the higher overclock. It's only $27 more than the one I posted last time (unless of course you got the Shopback bonus $60)

      • +1 vote

        Yep I was factoring in the shopback. I reckon the windforce card for 694$ was a bargain!

        • +3 votes

          It was for sure. Mine arrives tomorrow, just waiting on the PSU to arrive from MWave. It's been an expensive week, could have been worst if not for OzBargain.

    • -1 vote

      No.

      You could spend $99 on an Accelero Xtreme instead assuming you have room and a reference card.

  •  

    Whats the difference between this and another Gigabyte 2070 Super Gaming OC

  • +1 vote

    Nah they had it since the start of the sale, I was considering between 2070 supers and 2080 supers,I went with a 2080 super.

    • +1 vote

      2080s is very cool but the 2070s was already reaching the point of diminishing returns, 2080s was just too much a luxury for me whilst I was doing a full build.

      •  

        I wanted the Aorus version to match my motherboard and the 2080 super version which they only had one left was $287 more still expensive but Also bought a 240hz monitor so wanted the best GPU possible while also matching my build, 2080 ti was far too expensive for the aorus version.

        Now just waiting for a good deal on a new Intel CPU as my 9600k bottlenecks lol just overclocked it for now to help.

        • +2 votes

          The 2080ti price is really really over the roof now. If only we can get the June price backs :-(

  • -1 vote

    There's no way of knowing how far this card can be overclocked compared to any other.

    •  

      Gaming OC has thicker heatsink (2.25 slot rather than 2 slot) and higher power limit than the Windforce. It can be clocked higher going by comments of owners from googling around.

      •  

        Yeah but if you're weren't lucky in the silicon lottery and received worse-binned cores then your extra power phases and better cooling mean jack. Diji1 has a point; it's impossible to tell how well a given GPU will OC compared to another model that is also marketed as an enthusiast/OC-oriented model.

        I've had plenty of lower-tier GPUs from budget vendors that came out with higher ASIC scores and far better OC'ing potential than allegedly "premium-binned", much more expensive models.

  • +2 votes

    how is this one compared to 5700XT nitro+?

  • +4 votes

    Mid range graphics cards seem to be getting more expensive with each generation (they used to be ~ AUD $350 10 years ago); I wish they were priced more like TVs, where eah year you get more for less. That said each new generation is about 30 to 50% faster than the last, whereas CPUs only seem to gain ~6% in core performance (there are more cores now, but a lot of software is still just single core and makes little or no use of extra cores).

    For me, a lower class person, $800 is a lot of money.

    •  

      true, that's why I had only upgraded the GPU.

      my 4-5yr old CPU is only marginally slower in single-core pf. to be frank, not worth it…

      •  

        This is what I though with my intel 2500k paired with a 1070, but the reality is that your CPU (or motherboard/pcie lanes) may be bottle-necking your GPU
        Once I upgraded to Ryzen 1700x frame-rate improved significantly, like 30%+ in pubg

        •  

          2500k is actually slow in fact, and no support of many instructions used by modern games/softwares… sorry

          your upgrade is very timing!

    • +1 vote

      PC hardware in general has been regressing in value since about 2012/2013, especially CPUs, RAM and GPUs; the only component to buck this trend has been storage where SSD and HDD affordability is now finally surpassing cost-per-GB levels not seen since the 2011 Thailand floods that storage manufacturers milked for years as an excuse to artificially inflate prices.

      Back in 2013, around the time of AUD parity with the USD, the going rate for a PC (tower and internals only) classified as definitively "mid-range" was $1,000. These days, that gets you something that is definitively low-end and barely future-proof for the next year and a half.

      The proof is in the longevity of those legendary i5 2500K/i7 2600K/i5 3570K/i7 3770K builds from the Sandy Bridge/Ivy Bridge days. I'm still running a Sandy Bridge build as a spare PC at home that originally cost $1,300 and since that time, all I've had to do to keep it relevant is upgrade the GPU and I'd wager at least 70% of triple-A titles today can still be crunched at medium settings and a resolution of 1920x1080 by an i5 2500K OC'ed to 4.6Ghz paired with a RX 580 8GB/GTX 1060 GB.

      Moore's law has been completely irrelevant when it comes to consumer-grade technology for some years now; we're just getting shafted with planned obsolescence, tick/tock incremental trickle-down innovation that is deliberately stifled to ensure a highly-segregated product hierarchy, a myopic focus on mobile/smartphone computing that chews up 90% of R&D/resources in most semiconductor companies and absolutely rampant price-gouging.

      That and the pathological, deep-seated hatred most tech companies have developed for fat-client, desktop PCs and the entire concept of "power users" who have full control over their hardware and customise things as they see fit, makes now one of the worst eras for traditional computer enthusiasts.

      Microsoft, Intel, Apple, Google et al. would all really prefer that we only owned smartphones, tablets, sh*tty laptops or All-in-Ones that did none of their own heavy-lifting and integrated with cloud services to offload 90% of client-side processing.

      There is some kind of perverse, pseudo-Moore Law's going on here with how unbelievably rapidly and exponentially consumer computing technology is being crippled, restricted, devolved and reduced to a shell of its former potential by intense pressure from industry and governmental overlords that keep pushing data-mining, advertising, surveillance, censorship, Internet regulation, overreaching IP/copyright laws, cyber-crime hysteria and outright greed (though that last motivation is becoming less and less important).

      The natural consequence of all of these ridiculous impositions placed on consumer technology by thinly-veiled totalitarianism is that the cost of implementing all of these changes is passed onto the consumer and now we pay even higher prices for the same or even worse versions of the same products.

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