Question for Tech People (Internet Connection Two Storey House)

I have just got iinet cable internet (lucky to be in a located that it is offered). The modem that I received does not cover my whole house. I have multiple internet connections in my house and someone on gumtree is trying to sell a new iinet modem that I got when I signed up. I was wondering if I bought this modem would I be able to run and log into either modem at once? Would that impact my internet speed? Would it be better to purchase a router that repeats the signal to cover all my house instead of two modems? The modem is not very expensive so would be cheaper than buying a router, just unsure if would work. Grateful for any advice.

I am using 5G signal on my cable internet.

To explain myself clearer this is some more detailed info:

My house is double story (for half the house at the rear and is single for the front of the house). The distance from front to back is 30m and the house is 6 metres wide. The modem range covers 15 metres (halfway), so I need something which sends the wifi signal the extra 15 metres to to the front of the house.

What I mean by multiple connections is with cable wifi it is connected using a special plug rather than using a phone line plug for nbn/adsl. I have 3 plug connections in my house where I can plug in the modem. Currently I am using the rear connection, as using the rear of the house more than the front.

It appears Tenda mesh systems seem to be recommended from responses. Would I be able to get away with a Tenda MW3 mesh system (which is cheaper) or would I need Tenda MW6 mesh system due to extended range and how many units would I need in pack?

Comments

  • +4 votes

    Just buy a Tenda mesh

  • +3 votes

    Greatful for any advice.

    Grateful for any advice.

  • +3 votes

    Your best bet is buying a wifi repeater or a mesh system. What you are saying will not work. You would need to set the second router into repeater mode (if it supports it. They are also not very good).

    Easy, simple and cheaper way is to buy a wifi repeater.

  • +1 vote

    From your post, I don't think you've got a really good idea of what's going on here.

    First, I'm not sure what you mean by you have "multiple internet connections" in your house - are you referring to having more than one internet line, or that you have multiple devices on an internal network that you want to connect to the internet on one line? I suppose it's the latter because that's the more common case, so my advice will be based on that.

    You need to provide more details first - how big is your house, does it span multiple stories, are the walls standard drywall…etc. These are all issues which can affect WiFi performance. Basically, if you live in a relatively small house, you can get away with one access point (usually integrated with your router, but can be separate) in a central location. You might get better performance with a higher end access point or router, but the range is not going to be significantly better unless your current one is crap.

    If you live in a big house, one where walls are not plaster or across multiple stories, you will need to put access points in the deadzones. In general, think about the access point as having a circle around it where you can get a good connection. You want to try and figure out where the problem areas are. If you can move your current access point to a place where your deadzone is largely on one side of the house, you can install a new AP there. You'll need to run an ethernet cable above your ceiling to connect it to your router. This is easy if you can get above your ceiling (most houses will have a hole to get up there).

    Recommendation is something like the Ubiquity UniFi access point, around $120 or so and you should be able to fill in the deadzone. You could just get a WiFi repeater, but the problem is that they will just be sharing the same WiFi bandwidth. Remember that WiFi bandwidth is shared, not individual like wired ethernet, so if two systems are hitting the network at once, the bandwidth is split between them (even if you use a repeater). The only way around this is to have an individual independent access point connected back to the source with an ethernet cable.

    •  

      Thanks for such a detailed answer. I am sorry for not providing enough information or confusing information.
      To answer you questions and others that have responded-

      My house is double story (for half the house at the rear and is single for the front of the house). The distance from front to back is 30m and the house is 6 metres wide. The modem range covers 15 metres (halfway), so I need something which sends the wifi signal the extra 15 metres to to the front of the house.

      What I mean by multiple connections is with cable wifi it is connected using a special plug rather than using a phone line plug for nbn/adsl. I have 3 plug connections in my house where I can plug in the modem. Currently I am using the rear connection, as using the rear of the house more than the front.

      Do you think I would get by using Tenda MW3 mesh system like others have suggested or would I need Tenda MW6 mesh system due to extended range?

      Again, thanks for help!

      •  

        Do you think I would get by using Tenda MW3 mesh system like others have suggested or would I need Tenda MW6 mesh system due to extended range?

        Mesh WiFi systems do have their problems - like I mentioned before, the entire WiFi bandwidth is shared between all of your devices. Therefore, if you only have a few devices then it'll be fine, but the moment that you start adding in more devices, things will start going slow. If you add an another access point wired directly back to your router with Ethernet, you're not sharing the bandwidth. There's also concerns about latency and all of those sorts of things.

        If you just want more range without really caring about these issues, then yeah mesh will be fine (albeit expensive).

  •  

    I was wondering if I bought this modem would I be able to run and log into either modem at once? Would that impact my internet speed?

    It would not work. Your modem is tied to your account and you can't have more than one.

    Would it be better to purchase a router that repeats the signal to cover all my house instead of two modems?

    It would be better because it would actually work.

  • +2 votes

    I am using 5G signal on my cable internet.

    You should try connecting to your non-5g connection (2.4ghz) on devices that are further away from your router as well. 5g is faster, but 2.4 generally has better range/signal strength

  • -1 vote

    Avoid Tenda at all costs, those things are rubbish.
    Pay more and get a more reliable product, Netgear Orbi, Google Nest Wifi or the like.

    (don't @me people… i bought a Tenda and they are complete JUNK)

    •  

      I have had a Netgear modem and was very happy with it. Just Netgear and Google wifi products appear very expensive. Trying to get away with the cheapest possible solution. Did you buy Tenda MW3 or Tenda MW6? Would a Netgear Wifi extender do the job, as is not as expensive as Netgear Orbi, Google Nest Wifi.

      • +1 vote

        Extenders are good but they create a second WIFI zone which you have to manually connect to when in that area, also extenders by their design halve the speed when they repeat the signal. A mesh creates a single unified WIFI network throughout the house which means seamless connections without any speed loss.
        Google has just announced a new nest WIFI coming out in a month or so, the current Google WIFI's will probably be discounted around the place when the new ones come out.

        •  

          If I bought Google Wifi do you know how far the signal would go or if I would need more than one?

          •  

            @kizashi: for a two storey home you are going to want at least 3.. one in main part of house (modem area) one at back of home and one at top of stairs.. i am yet to see anyone get a twin pack to work for a 2 level home.

  •  

    do you mean there is a cable from where the modem is now to where you want the second modem to go?

    if so, then yes, just
    plug the an Ethernet cable from modem 1 to wall socket

    on the other side from wall socket to modem 2

    on the second modem, disable dhcp
    assign an IP address in the same range as modem 1

    choose a different WiFi channel to modem 1 (1/8/11)

    change wifi details to same as modem 1 (optional)

  •  

    No, l am using cable internet. Have 3 cable internet points located through the house.

  • +1 vote

    Ethernet over powerline works OK too and the kits aren't that expensive

  •  

    Had iiNet cable myself while I still lived in Geelong (man I miss it, FTTC is good but not "500mbps down" good); the cable internet is great but the modem they supply with it has terrible wifi signal.

    In the end I found a good deal on a Netgear Nighthawk R7000P so I grabbed one, bridged the cable gateway modem to it and used that for wifi instead, the difference was crazy and every part of the house was covered, including on 5GHz. In your case though I'd agree a mesh setup is the way to go if you want to guarantee coverage in a bigger house like yours.

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