What Is Your Go-to Candy to Give Halloween Trick-or-Treaters?

Presumably cheap and tasty and plentiful- by unit price or per unit

Comments

  • +22 votes

    Expired from the reject shop, and a spray with the garden hose.

  • +3 votes

    They are lucky this year with just out of date Musk Lifesaver packets $7 per 24 :)

    Normally some nasty Chinese made confectionary bought by accident .

    •  

      Normally some nasty Chinese made confectionary bought by accident

      White Rabbit lollies ?

  • +2 votes

    All the unwanted chuppachup flavours my kids don't like that came in the bulk pack

  • +1 vote

    Allen's Minties - great for fillings.

  • +18 votes

    Damn, I’ve logged into USABargains again…

  • +1 vote

    As they've proven unwilling to follow through on their threats of a trick, I give them no treats.

  • +6 votes

    Brussel sprouts wrapped in Ferrero Rocher foil.
    Coat the brussel sprouts in Vegemite first.

  • +3 votes

    Candy corn extenda. it's like the cheap candy corn but even cheaper. and when i run out of that, flintstones chewable morphine

  • +2 votes

    Forget those little Semen Demon's… Don't give them anything for free…

    Freeloading A-holes.

  • +2 votes

    How about an onion wrapped in al-foil ?

  • +3 votes

    i dont give candy, i give lollies and sweet and chocolate.

  • +2 votes

    I tell them and their parents to rack off to the USA if they want free candy.

  •  

    Brussel sprouts coated in chocolate.

  • -1 vote

    People that dislike Halloween because it's American in origin confuse me. It's a great day, you get to dress up, and kids love it. We get tons of trick or treaters in our street and do decorations. It's so much fun

    •  

      Maybe because it isn't American.
      It is just that some people in this country have chosen (or been brainwashed) to adopt the American version of Halloween.

      • -1 vote

        Ah yes, the celtic origins of the day where you wear animal heads and skins to ward off ghosts. Much better than getting lollies

        •  

          Not necessarily.
          It is usually about the supernatural, witches, spirits and fire.
          - Lanterns (usually pumpkins), each hand-carved and lit with candles in the middle, to ward off evil spirits
          - Bonfires to scare away the undead; great for a community gathering
          - Children dress up as evil spirits, visit neighbours and perform a party trick, and receive an offering of fruit or nuts to ward off evil
          - Dunking for apples

          Sounds like plenty of fun there, without the need for "candy" on demand.

          •  

            @GG57: All of those things are part of halloween as celebrated in more or less the same form.

            • people carve pumpkins (or better yet, what I did - carve a watermelon. It looks cooler and you get the delicious fruit, plus it's in season)
            • bonfires aren't a great idea in Australia right now
            • kids dress up as various things including witches, superheroes etc and get lollies
            • dunking for apples is super boring but might be part of a halloween party

            So it seems like you just object to "candy"? You're free to give out fruit and nuts but kids won't really like that…

            •  

              @one man clan: You started this conversation with this sentence:
              People that dislike Halloween because it's American in origin confuse me

              You have then taken the info I provided related to the (non-USA) origins and customs of Halloween, dismiss the majority of those and make tenuous links to how (some) Australians 'celebrate' this event.

              The reasons for bonfires, and treats such as fruit and nuts, is that Halloween traditionally signals the end of the harvesting season and the start of winter.
              To me, the event does not even make sense in this hemisphere.

              So, yes I don't like how Australians have adopted a northern hemisphere custom, including the non-traditional aspects such as how the USA 'celebrate' this, and those people cannot understand why not everyone wants to get involved.

    • +3 votes

      I don't dislike Halloween itself, but I dislike the fact that I need to put a poster saying I don't want to participate to deter random strangers knocking on my door well into the night.
      Here's a hint for both kids and parents: if you see a house with no signs or decorations whatsoever, move onto the next door.

      •  

        Despite the inherent question of the phrase, "trick or treat," the socially accepted response is to give the person candy. There's no official verbal response to it, though most reply with some variant of, "Happy Halloween," or a compliment if you like the person's costume. Trick or Treat is technically threat, asking if you'd rather give a treat or receive a trick to be performed by the person asking. That said, most don't perform tricks anymore, though egging or toilet papering houses and/or destroying jack o lanterns are popular tricks people pull.

      •  

        You don’t need to. Kids only knock on houses displaying halloween things, like scary dolls, spiderwebs etc

        •  

          You don’t need to.

          But I do need to.
          The previous years my house has seen too many kids/young teenagers doing the knock-wait-knock again despite no decorations and no one answering the door.
          Putting up a sign stopped this.

  • +2 votes

    Onions made to look like candied apples

  •  

    Usually drugs.

    (At least that's what concerned parents think!)

  • +1 vote

    What suburb do you have this trick or treating at?

    Mine hasn't had any for many decades. lol.

  • +3 votes

    Who do I blame for the introduction of Halloween into Australia? It wasn't a thing in my day. The internet? Social media? Influencers? Woolies and Coles etc?

  •  

    I live in a flat estate one way in one out, a lot of retirees now or parents without kids or with teenagers, most kids have grown up in last 14 years . Parents just drop their kids at the entrance and let them run a muck. 3 otto bins stops them getting to our front door.

  •  

    Haven't bought any sweets. Doing last min tax returns. RIP.

  • +2 votes

    Give them a single tic tac.

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