Free Pharmacy Prescription Home Delivery for The Vulnerable and Those in Isolation @ Australia Post

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As reported -

Australia Post is launching a new free prescription delivery service to assist vulnerable Australians and people isolating to access medication from home.

From Monday, pharmacies around the country can offer free delivery on prescriptions to their customers through the Pharmacy Home Delivery Service.

The new delivery option will support vulnerable Australians, including those isolating themselves at home, people over 70 and people with chronic health conditions.

The initiative allows vulnerable members of the community to receive medication and other essential supplies under 500 grams once a month through Australia Post’s Express Post network.

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Comments

    • +62 votes

      Yeah, I agree. Screw those people for going to refill their medication they depend on.

          • +5 votes

            @AlexF: Not sure if I’m needing to clarify but I’m referring to people who have been overseas or have been in contact with COVID patients and are REQUIRED to self-isolate. They are still presenting themselves to pharmacies to fill their scripts nI’m not referring to the general need for the community to go into self-isolation given the current landscape. These are the selfish and irresponsible people I’m referring to, if you have a chronic condition and are affected by the medication supply disruption then I can only sympathise. But there are pharmacies which are better at procuring stock, I suppose you just need to find the right one.

            Any disruption in medicine supply at this point in time is a combination of the hoarding that occurred prior to government restrictions on dispensing and the suppliers currently withholding stock and slowly filtering it out. This will prevent this short-term disruption progressing to long-term shortages where people with chronic illness are even more adversely affected.

            • +5 votes

              @mmmnuggets:

              I’m referring to people who have been overseas or have been in contact with COVID patients and are REQUIRED to self-isolated

              a drowning man will clutch at straw.

            •  

              @mmmnuggets: I think most people just misunderstood your first comment. I knew exactly that you were referring to those people required to self isolate, as opposed to the rest that are advised to stay home.

              Many chemists offer a free delivery service to their elderly or unwell patients too, so people may prefer to call them first to check. Would probably be faster than AusPost too! 😊

          • +6 votes

            @AlexF:

            1. mmmnuggets is only talking about people who need to be in iso/quarantine.

            2. what is your medication you're missing? I am a pharmacist.

  •  

    Screws ?

  • +16 votes

    If you have been told to self isolate because of exposure to covid-19 and you don't your a Dick and potentially a murderer.

    • +35 votes

      *You're

      Grammar - The difference between knowing your shit, and knowing you're shit.

    •  

      Murder is intentional slaying of another human. Living your life as a free individual in a democratic country isn't murder, it's chancing that "It won't happen to me". It's a real conundrum on what to do. They're saying that many people may be asymptomatic carriers. How long are we going to lock down for if people are asymptomatic carriers? This thing will just keep doing the rounds. Where and when will it stop? It appears the US is taking a 'meh' approach to this, after all, Trump is at core a businessman. We'll see which strategy works best in a few months. Stay tuned.

      • +3 votes

        Murder is intentional slaying of another human.

        I wonder if it would come under S35 of Crimes Act 1900, where :

        "Grievous bodily harm" includes—

        (a) the destruction (other than in the course of a medical procedure or a termination of a pregnancy in accordance with the Abortion Law Reform Act 2019 ) of the foetus of a pregnant woman, whether or not the woman suffers any other harm, and

        (b) any permanent or serious disfiguring of the person, and

        (c) any grievous bodily disease (in which case a reference to the infliction of grievous bodily harm includes a reference to causing a person to contract a grievous bodily disease).

    • +16 votes

      I read that as " …your Dick is potentially a murderer" 😂

    • +1 vote

      People are still driving despite knowing that 1200 people are killed by cars every year in this country, are they all potential murderers?

      Don't get me wrong, they should absolutely be self isolating, but I'm getting sick of hysterical demonisation.

      • +1 vote

        I understand the point you're trying to get at, but I think context is extremely important.

        Yes, people who are driving are potential murderers (key word, potential). Each and every driver has the potential to murder, even if it is accidental. However, there are factors that can increase the odds that a driver will hurt or kill someone. I.e. drunk driving, speeding, distracted driving, etc. Here are some statistics https://www.budgetdirect.com.au/car-insurance/research/car-a.... When drivers make the choice to engage in activities that have an increased the risk of someone getting hurt or killed, though they are more likely than not to get away with it without incident, and they do harm others- they are demonised. You don't read about drunk drivers hurting or killing people and the press and/or public saying things along the lines of "oh that's okay, the driver had a right to go on a bender and not think about the consequences to others". A quick search online will show how many people are flouting rules that have been implemented to protect the wider public. Worse yet, there are also more and more stories emerging specifically about people who knowingly have Covid 19 are going about interacting with others.

        This brings me to the second point of the scale of the impact. Car accidents are more evenly spread throughout the year and are expected to happen. The importance of this is that the resources (i.e. health care, police) are able to cope with these. They are confined directly to those involved (i.e. the drivers, emergency workers, family members, police) and one car accident does not have a domino effect onto another with the possibility of the number of accidents increasing exponentially. Have a quick search of the health care system and workers in countries that have been hit hard. The workers are having mental breakdowns, there are not enough beds, there is not enough equipment, they are being infected and therefore have to self isolate etc. It's not a pretty scene with bodies on the street, lying in hallways, lonely deaths, etc. Additionally, tasks like tracking drains valuable resources at much faster rate when people choose to ignore self-isolation. If the number of cases are low, there is a possibility this could effectively, but if not it would be impossible to do.

        A couple of things I wonder if experts have taken into consideration when modelling whether or not countries can manage is the reduced efficacy of workers as time goes on (a comparison of let's say a nurse on day one vs. day 7 after worker 7 days straight for 12 hours for example) and the reduction of front line workers if this goes on for an extended period of time (due to things like deaths, breakdowns, isolation). The importance of this if it hasn't been properly taken into account is that health care systems could be overwhelmed and unable to cope earlier than expected.

        So really, the government has a few choices including, but not limited to hardcore lockdown measures or encouraging those to the right thing and demonising unnecessary risky behaviour. For the latter the government does not have the power to influence that change on their own and heavily rely on the wider public to self regulate itself. A quick online search will bring up many results of many people intentionally engaging in risky behaviours with reasons varying from they don't care if people die, they think they're immune, they think it's their right to do whatever they want, etc. There is no credible medical expert that says the best way from a scientific point of view only that any things but containment is the best strategy.

        I think when you look at a global context, Australia is nowhere near the stage of "hysterical demonetisation". It might also be useful to consider the following:

        -The daily rate of increases has slowed down, though it admittedly is not long enough to call it a trend. There are things that are working.

        -The number of deaths is still relatively low. Again things are working.

        -Seasonality is a factor and with colder temperatures coming, it seems sensible to be cracking down now before it's too late.

        -If the current strategy does not continue to show signs of improvement, you can bet the government will escalate restrictions. Search what some countries have done to get their country's figures under control. Here are some examples, part of China- months of absolute lockdowns with people being dragged out of their home and forced into quarantine if house checks show you have a temperature of any sort, South Korea- government accessing credit card, phone data, etc to track all movements of those infected. There are people on Ozbargain worried about selling their information to companies, imagine the uproar if the government had access to everything about you in the name of tracking a virus. What is happening here is a walk in the park in comparison. I will take Australia's version of hysterical demonetisation any day.

  • +7 votes

    Is there something I can take that will put me to sleep for 9 months and when I wake this will all be over? Head in the sand works well when there's no way to fight an invisible enemy.

  • +6 votes

    Australia post now takes 14 days to deliver simple letter from Melbourne Metro to Brisbane Metro, so if you really need your prescription look elsewhere.

    •  

      I received these oral-B replacement heads within 48 hours. The packaging is bigger than a webster pack.

    • +4 votes

      It always takes ages to deliver to rural areas

    • +1 vote

      Why do they care about letters, the money is in parcels nowadays. My Australian Post parcels are, usually, promptly delivered.

      •  

        Well, you must be lucky then. My last parcel sent from Gold Coast to Brisbane CBD on 17th of March was delivered on 25th. First it was sitting 3 days in Redbank depot and then 4 days in Pinkenba depot. And it had "perishable" plastered all over it. Oh, I totally forgot, that was Express Post supposedly overnight delivery. Save your time and nerves and use some courier service, they charge exactly the same and actually deliver on time.

    •  

      it says express….

      so many people in this thread not reading.

    •  

      Or just ring your local chemist and they will probably home deliver for free too.
      My chemist has offered that in the past.

  • +3 votes

    Here's a link to the service https://www.ppaonline.com.au/programs/covid-19-home-medicine... and show's who's eligible.

    • +1 vote

      Thanks for that link. I wish they would clarify 'new' baby. I have a baby but hes not a newborn. The medicare teleconference service is for babies under 12 months so I assume this is the same. I think maybe I should leave the service for those with actual newborns. But the official advice is isolate babies under 18 months. Confused here :(

  • +18 votes

    Still have to go down to the post office to collect it. After they leave a we have missed you slip.

    • +2 votes

      Nope. These will not be carded. If you aren't home they are taken back to the DC, customer contacted and an alternative time/method arranged for delivery. This is being taken VERY seriously.

      •  

        What about those in apartment blocks? One postie or two arrive rings the bell of at least 2 if 1 of these two has the virus then all will be infected due to close contact in lifts or when passing by

  •  

    Don't they still need to go to the doctor to get/pick up the prescription itself?

  • +22 votes

    Pharmacist here, please don't assume your pharmacy will be offering this service. We have to pay Auspost first, and after lots of paperwork, then they will pay the pharmacy back. Pharmacies already are drowning in a workload higher than normal and might not have time to participate in this.

    If your local pharmacy do decide to offer this, you'll need to leave your repeats with them first otherwise it will be messy.

  • +1 vote

    Please update link to offical info https://www.health.gov.au/sites/default/files/documents/2020...

    Other groups are also eligible:
    Who will benefit from this service?
    The service is available to:
    • people isolating themselves at home on the advice of a medical practitioner, for
    confirmed COVID-19 cases;
    • people who meet the current national triage protocol criteria for suspected COVID-19
    infection after consultation with either the national COVID-19 hotline, state COVID-19 hotlines, a registered medical or nursing practitioner or COVID-19 trained health clinic triage staff;
    • people aged over 70;
    • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people aged over 50;
    • people with chronic health conditions or who are immunocompromised;
    • parents with new babies and people who are pregnant.

    •  

      Again, that link does not say Australia Post are providing the service free.

      •  

        "How much will the Home Medicines Service cost me?
        There is no cost for you. However, you can receive the service no more than once per
        month.
        If you want more than one delivery per month, your pharmacy may charge a fee.
        The Home Medicines Service is intended to support, not replace, existing home delivery
        options available through pharmacies. Speak to your pharmacy to find out more"

        The consumer does not pay where the pharmacy is offering this service. I assume pharmacies will pay Australia Post and then claim the cost back from the Australian Government.

        • +1 vote

          OK I have it in an email message from AP today
          QUOTE

          We’ve also launched our Pharmacy Home Delivery Service to support vulnerable members of the community and those in self-isolation, so they can have ongoing access to essential medications. Pharmacies can offer free delivery on prescriptions to their customers so speak to your pharmacy to see if you or a family member qualifies for this service.

  • +10 votes

    This is a good initiative by Australia Post. Don't knock it
    As a medical professional, I am telling ALL MY PATIENTS to self Isolate, SICK or NOT.
    That means No Visitors and friends, keep your distance and one person to do essential trips only.
    The virus is likely to send 10-20 percent to hospital.
    Of those 3% will end up in ICU.
    That group are unlikely to be coming home!
    Those that survive may end up with lifelong lung issues.
    Ten percent of health workers are likely to contract the virus.
    As the premier of Tasmania said "this is not a drill".
    Please spread the intent of this posting.

    • +2 votes

      Agree.
      One problem is: Supermarket is unavoidable since they no longer offer delivery for the non-vulnerable, and masks are hard to come by.

      • +1 vote

        Even for the vulnerable, it’s not as beneficial as you might think. I am in isolation due to a compromised immune system and have access to Woolies priority delivery. The website is still out of stock for many basic items (meat, toilet paper, hand soaps and sanitisers etc), and with the product limits I can’t even do my usual shop. Add on the ~$15 delivery fee, it becomes a very expensive gamble with a good chance many of your ordered items will be out of stock.

    • +2 votes

      So if I’m walking down the street, and the closest people to me are roughly 3 metres away, and I don’t touch anything as I go past, exactly what is my risk profile? How much does this increase if you quickly pass people, who aren’t coughing or sneezing, and keep walking? I keep my supermarket shopping to a minimum, I keep my hygiene up, I’m not visiting friends but I want a risk profile and my daily walk, for exercise. I can’t find anything that indicates this would be, inherently, risky behaviour. What would be the transmission method here.

      I’m more concerned about handling goods contaminated at the supermarkets. What is the likelihood of fruit/vegetables being contaminated by other people handling them? If so, what is the best method to decontaminate them? Should I be concerned about frozen fruit? I’m pretty sure my walks aren’t going to kill me, but I’m not so confident about stuff I bring home from the supermarket.

      I’m happy to do what they say but I would like a risk profile to go with it.

      • +1 vote

        We have been using the sanitising wipes on trolley handles for a very long time (our supermarket provides these most of the time next to the trolleys). Apart from the perishables best to leave your other items in shopping bags, on the floor. COVID19 can be transferred for up to 3 days on vinyl/plastics but less than that on other items. Just wash everything else and remember to wash and sanitise your hands when you return home. We also use a sanitising wipes on door handles when we arrive back home.

    •  

      Lol, Aus post is playing the helpful card for a service they will charge for. The business is just playing with words in its marketing/ free advertising. So, if you need urgent medication, dont not rely on Auspost. Call your regular pharmacy as most will rely on their own staff to do local deliveries for regular customers and patients in need.

  • +4 votes

    This is not an initiative of Australia Post. They are just offering a postal service. Some pharmacies are already offering the same delivery service. The program is from the Australian government and Australia Post is saying they can be the middle man delivering between pharmacy and patient.

  • +10 votes

    To make things clear, the federal government is funding this program. Pharmacies pays Auspost and claims $7.70 per delivery per month from government.
    Employee Pharmacists already overworked (and underpayed too) will be the ones left to do the substantial amount of extra paperwork

    • +1 vote

      Exactly this! We are already under the pressure and this just adds more workload. A lot of pharmacies around my area can't even keep up to date with new rules and regulations from the government e.g. 1 ventolin. Customers come in angry thinking that I'm making up rules when they can get ventolin easily down the road at Chester Hill Pharmacy.

      It's very full on at pharmacies, groceries, I wish people would practise more patience and calm.

      But I do like the initiative.

  • +1 vote

    A medication management app called MedAdvisor is also rolling out a home delivery service, including same day delivery. They've partnered with a lot of pharmacies.

    https://www.businessnewsaus.com.au/articles/medadvisor-launc...

  • +2 votes

    I'm trying to assume the best, but considering how they treat 'fragile' packaging and how many times I've been home and watched the Auspost contractor card my delivery instead of knocking on the door, I really don't have much faith in this.

    • +1 vote

      Pills aren't fragile (generally). Most should be ok even if dropkicked down a flight of stairs. They are packed very well.

  • +1 vote

    This would be so much more useful if Australia Post would release information to Pharmacies on how to subscribe to this service rather than spouting on about it via the media without even issuing a bulletin to pharmacies on how to participate.

    Customers will start asking about this as of tomorrow, pharmacies will call Australia Post call centres (think of Centrelink staff on anti-depressants) and ZERO free post items will be dispatched nation wide tomorrow.

  • +2 votes

    Hi All, take a chill, I know self-isolation is hard, don't make it harder for you and everyone with your comments. Cheer up, calm down, listen to music, do some exercises and realise that right now is the time we have to try extra hard to be nicer to each other. This is the time you will remember for decades. This is the time you will be telling your kids and grand kids about. So make sure you will be telling them how compassionate and kind you were. how helpful and understanding you were and how world became a better place because of you. Think of that 106 yo lady that gave an interview about Spanish Flu and make sure you'll have good and kind stories to tell!

  • -1 vote

    Can I get toilet paper and liquid hand soap as a prescription?

  • +1 vote

    Hopefully paid out of the CEO's obscene pay packet, but probably not.

  • +2 votes

    It’s only free to those that quality but paid by government.

    Healthy World Pharmacy in Westfield Upper Mt Gravatt is doing free delivery for everyone within 5km radius. Company us absorbing the delivery costs to give back to the community. 👍🏻👍🏻 Same day delivery if ordered before noon.

    I don’t know if any pharmacies doing free delivery for everyone locally

  • +1 vote

    Now that it's Monday - any info any how to redeem this, for example which pharmacies are offering it?

  •  

    Anyone know if hypertension is considered a "chronic health condition"?