Two Year Old SUV Caught Fire While Driving, Dealership Refusing to Cover under Warranty/Consumer Guarantee

Apologies in advance for the wall of text, this is the first time I've sought help online as we're being given the run around.

TLDR Situation:
2.5yr old car, well looked after and regularly serviced, spontaneously caught fire while driving on freeway. Car dealership not honouring any warranty/guarantee. What are my rights? Do I have to prove there was a fault in the car or is the fact it caught fire enough?

In detail:
My partner's car, a 2.5yr old SUV worth ~$40k (bought new from dealer) caught fire while she was driving. We were moving house, I was in a car about 40 minutes behind her, and she had driven around 700km (with breaks every couple of hours) before the car started making a funny sound while travelling on the freeway. She called me for advice and after speaking for about 10 seconds, she noticed smoke coming from the car. I told her to pull over and call 000 - which she did. While pulling over, a warning message came up stating the car was overheating. After pulling over, the fire was put out by the fire brigade.

The fire was under the bonnet of the car and we have photos to show the underside plastic melted, but are otherwise unsure of the extent of the damage, as we are not proficient in cars and didn't get to look closely before it was towed. It has been suggested to us by multiple people that have seen the car, that it was oil that caught fire.

The car was towed initially to a crash repairer, and assessed for a couple of days. They were not able to fully assess the car there.
We contacted the dealer where the car was bought (Dealer A) and were told to contact the manufacturer directly (Parent Company). Parent Company called us back and asked to move the car to the local dealer of that car brand (Dealer B). The car has been at that dealer for over 3 weeks under the pretense that it will be assessed for a warranty/consumer guarantee claim.
We have recently been told by Dealer B that they will not investigate any further because they believe they have found the cause of the fire - the radiator cap was found to be off when the car was towed to them. They could not find any damage to the cap on inspection. They state they have assessed the car for 2 hours and will not assess it any further because they are satisfied that this is the cause of the fire. If we want them to assess further it will cost us $140/hr to hire them to do so. They say this is not their fault and not a warranty claim.

We dispute their explanation on a number of fronts:
No-one has touched the radiator cap other than the servicer (Dealer A) before the fire, in which case it would be their fault and should be covered by them.
We deduced that it is more plausible that the cap was removed by the fire brigade after the fire was put out.
Presuming the cap was removed, it seems implausible to me that the car could drive 700km on a hot day (was 45 degrees at times that day) without issue and then suddenly and unexpectedly fail.
Suppose, then, that the cap was instead removed sometime during the trip - which is also implausible because the radiator would have been hot, and my partner simply did not remove the cap nor did anyone else (why would she???). How long could a car drive without the cap on?
Lastly, the warning lights never came on before the issue started and one would expect the car to say it is running low on coolant and/or overheating before such a critical failure.

We have had a lot of back and forth between Dealer B and us. We actually got my uncle to 'represent' us because he is a lawyer and knows cars, and was eager to help. But unfortunately this has become too much work for him to do and now it's back on us to sort it out.

We've tried to get the car assessed but there's no-one privately that can do it and everyone has suggested going through our insurer.
For the record, the car IS insured but we have concerns that it will be a write-off and market value is less than what we would need to replace it (a possible loss of $8k-10k). This would also cost us the excess, any other insurance costs (eg the premiums for the rest of the insurance year) and increased premiums/loss of no-claim-bonus.

My partner had planned to look for work at our new home but has been out of work because we now only have 1 car and this whole fiasco has taken a lot of her time. We have arranged to meet with Dealer B in a few days and I want to be prepared.

My questions are:
What are our rights here?
Do I have to prove the cause of the fire is a faulty car or is the burden of proof on the car company/dealer?
Furthermore, is their explanation enough when it seems so easy to dispute/implausible?
Do we have the right to insist they complete the assessment of the vehicle?
What would be considered a reasonable time-frame for the dispute to be resolved? They have had the car for 3+ weeks and we seem to have gotten nowhere.

What should we do next?
Options:
1) Cut our losses and get insurance to pay out.
2) Stick to our guns
2a) Call ACCC
2b) Get a local lawyer and go to town
2c) Keep going ourselves
3) Bikies?

to make matters worse..
One of the first passers-by that stopped, while the car was on fire, stole my partner's wallet, handbag and a bag of valuables (that we ironically had decided to transport ourselves because we thought it safer than with the removalists…). He also spent up big on her credit/debit cards.
So this fire cost us a hell of a lot more than just the car!!

I am grateful for any help or advice anyone can provide. Thanks for reading this far!

UPDATE
Thanks everyone for your input! I've been very busy in the last few days with work and haven't had a chance to reply to everyone as I'd like.

The update is as follows:
- It's NOT a jeep, nor a tuscon.
- I'm not going to name the make because if the cause of the fire is something like rodent wire damage etc I do not want to tarnish the name of the company.
- I have spoken again with the dealer and they have agreed to examine the car properly. This is after learning a few more facts.
- The fire burnt through the bottom tray of the engine. And the radiator cap was found down there too. But it was not damaged, not by fire or by impact into the bottom of the bonnet.
- The damage is estimated at $20k.
- The fire was engine oil. There is evidence of burnt oil but not sure where it has come from.
- There was coolant was splashed all over the engine. It looks like it either exploded or boiled over but can't say which at this stage.
- The onboard computer logged only 2 errors - one was the overheating error that came up after the smoke appeared (as mentioned above). And an immobilisation/theft warning (that was presumably triggered by the tow truck or something).
- Unfortunately, these errors are not time-stamped but it does prove there was no other warning that came up before the fire, and there was no low coolant or overheating until some sort of catastrophic failure.
- So far, there is still no cause of the fire. No cause of the coolant cap coming off.

UPDATE 2
Added photo of underside of engine bay
https://ibb.co/dk8RP8t

Comments

    •  

      Yeh it is a good question and it's one we asked the dealer. It was at the bottom of the motor, on the bottom tray nearby to where the fire had burnt a hole in the bottom. It wasn't damaged though - nothing to indicate it blew off under pressure, nor that it was there when the fire was alight. I wonder whether the fire brigade's high pressure hose could have blown it off and down into the engine? Anyway, explaining these inconsistencies have convinced the dealer to have a closer look at the car because the radiator cap being off for that long of a trip doesn't make sense to me.

  • +1 vote

    Check make history. Is there a history of this issue?

    •  

      Checked. No other history of similar as far as I can tell. Nothing according to the dealer either - not that he'd admit to that anyway.

  • +5 votes

    no make or model means you are not really interested in getting accurate advice.

    •  

      Respectfully I disagree - I am interested in advice regarding the questions I had. They are general questions and don't require the knowledge of the exact car.

  • +14 votes

    My questions are:
    What are our rights here?

    You have the right to tell us the make/model and MY of the car.

  •  

    Call your insurance - i would name and shame because i am assuming if it is a new car it should be under new car warrenty most cars have at least a 3 year warranty these days buy another car not the same brand and move on.

    •  

      New car warranty normally cover 2 years for new car replacement unless you buy from the manufacture which offered 3 years.

  • +11 votes

    lol, did OP reveal the make and model yet?

    • +18 votes

      no - joke thread

      •  

        If you think so then that's fine. But I'm just trying to ensure I don't defame anyone.

        • +1 vote

          make and model ain't defamation

          •  

            @petry: Sure. But I'd prefer to take no chances.

            • +1 vote

              @Justtip: wasted peoples time here then playing games

  •  

    warning lights never came on before the issue started

    can your partner remember what was the reading/position of the needle of the "engine temperature gauge"? It should be around the mid point when operating normally.
    It is always better to check this guage time to time when you are driving.

    if it was in the middle, then the cause of fire could be due to some road debris hitting a fuel line and got it ignited.

  • +1 vote

    Would be very interesting to see the OBD logs.

    •  

      Yeh the dealer told us there were only two errors - an overheating error (which was the one that appeared only as my partner was pulling the car over, after the sounds and smoke started). And the other was presumably caused by the tow truck - it was a theft alert/immobilisation error/alarm.
      That's it. No low coolant, or overheating coolant.
      Weirdly, there were no timestamps which is a huge bummer because that would be conclusive.

  • +2 votes

    Why is this anything but an insurance claim in the first instance?

    They will employ a forensic engineer if there's any doubt about the cause but unless this vehicle has a proven track record of fire issues then it will just be paid out. The exact figure of course is something the OP will need to workout with the insurance company

    Radiator cap or not, anything could have happened totally outside of the manufacturers design e.g. a rock hitting a transmission cooler/radiator/oil sump etc. Rodents could equally have bitten through wiring insulation but again it's all speculation without a forensic investigation and evidence after a sever fire might be hard to obtain anyway.

    Accept agreed pay out and move on…

    •  

      I guess this is a fair comment. But look at it this way, if this were a new laptop or something that suddenly caught fire, would you go to your insurance and be out of pocket? Or would you take it back to the shop and ask for it to be repaired/replaced? Because cars, like laptops, shouldn't catch fire. And yes, it may have been some extrinsic cause - but that's like saying you could have dropped the laptop, or spilled some liquid on it. And ultimately if that were the case, the laptop manufacturer/shop would have to prove evidence of that.

  • +10 votes

    Insurance needs to handle it
    /end of story

    And tell us the damn car already

    • +4 votes

      yeah, its not like he is hurting that specific dealer. It is just going to hurt the parent company and at least then they will pay more attention to these faults.

      CMON OP! Name the make and model of the car. My money, like someone else mentioned, is on the Jeep.

      • +1 vote

        He just needs to say it rhymes with some other word or phrase… That's a way around it, but OP clearly doesn't have the rhymes with 'halls'….

  • +1 vote

    Too long to read but I get the jist, similar thing happened to my dad went in for service they didn't replace the oil cap next day interstate trip and half way through the car stopped. Lesson is to always check the car especially before long distance trip and soon after purchase or straight after service.

  • +5 votes

    wow thanks for posting all these details!

    but really, model & year should be mentioned, it is almost a public safety issue, given the circumstances

  • +5 votes

    I don't get the comment about the credit cards. Report it stolen and it is covered by the bank.

    • +2 votes

      need to dial up the victim angle.

  • +5 votes

    WHY THE HELL DID YOU NOT TAKE IT TO THE INSURANCE FIRST OF ALL! That's why you pay insurance. Let them handle the battle of blame-handling. You just get payout and you buy a new car that's all you worry about. But no you are doing essentially what the insurance is doing!

    • +1 vote

      This!

    •  

      It's because the estimated payout isn't enough to buy an equivalent car. I suspect because 2nd-hand car prices have gone up, but whoever decides the insurer's 'market value' prices hasn't kept up?

  • +5 votes

    If it's Jeep Wrangler then check the below link.
    https://www.caradvice.com.au/821668/jeep-wrangler-recalled-i...

  • +3 votes

    We deduced that it is more plausible that the cap was removed by the fire brigade after the fire was put out.

    Firefighters are very unlikely to remove the radiator cap. In fact, of all the car fires I've been to, it has never happened.

    Why would they remove it? It makes no sense - the radiator contains water, which doesn't catch fire. I've seen car batteries removed, and I've seen some idiots cut wires and wiring looms, but I've never seen anyone remove a radiator cap.

    • -3 votes

      the radiator contains water, which doesn't catch fire

      Not necessarily. My car contains (i believe most modern cars as well) a pink fluid which the manual says is extremely flammable. It’s a closed system that usually does not require topping up unless there is a leak.

      • +1 vote

        Flammable on it's own, inflammable when diluted… Would be a stretch for it to have been the cause of this fire. It's a pure loss of coolant and engine overheat fire

        • +1 vote

          inflammable means flammable

          • +1 vote

            @CJ31: Nonflammable …. Lol

            Learn something every day. Apparently it's a common mistake for flammable/inflammable.

            • +1 vote

              @Bamboozle: Completely logical one given that sticking an "in" in front usually means "not" ie "voluntary/involuntary" "edible/inedible".

              • +1 vote

                @CJ31:

                sticking an "in" in front usually means "not"

                Ah, Dusty. Infamous is when you're more than famous! This guy El Guapo is not just famous, he's IN-famous.

    •  

      Yes, I agree. Honestly, I don't know how it came to be at the bottom of the motor. Maybe their high-pressure water hose blew it off? Not sure

  • +2 votes

    Search your make and model of your car here:
    https://www.productsafety.gov.au/recalls

    •  

      Thank you for this, found some recalls but none relating to anything that we've experienced

  • +3 votes

    OP is not the driver, claims to live in Adelaide, driven 700km and is still on a freeway ? Partner talks to OP while driving, Claims oil caught fire ? OMG

    Oh, a few facts: I seen 100s of car fires: None has ever survived an oil (engine or transmission) fire. Putting petrol into a diesel even just a small ammount can cause fires on some models.
    Fires that I had seen extiguished not resulting in a write off: Mostly vermin nests or small electrical fires. No insurance is paying for vermin damage, it is something that a user should lift the bonnet and see upon a visual inspection. Electrical fires from dodgy aftermarket installations usually get knocked back.

    Without knowing the model we are just being foled. Perhaps OP has a reason to avoid insurance?

    • +1 vote

      I think OP had moved between Adelaide and Melbourne, that's around 700km and could be on freeway at the end.

      Although he is telling it as a fire, could be just "boiling" radiator/ melted plastic radiator?

    •  

      There is a way to solve the vermin problem, you can install an ultrasonic device in the engine bay that runs permanently (connected to battery obv)

    •  

      No it was definitely an oil fire. Smoke was white, flame was blue, and both the firies and the dealer have confirmed it was an oil fire.
      As for avoiding insurance: It's because we don't know the cause of the fire and the car is under warranty - why would we want to be significantly out of pocket if it's a warranty issue?

  • +1 vote

    Just claim under insurance. Realistically the car dealer isn’t going to admit fault for leaving the cap off. It’s very unlikely the fire brigade took it off because why would they? If the cap blew off it would have damage on it.

    Losing out on agreed value is the risk you take when you elect that valuation method.

  • +2 votes

    This is obviously an insurance job. Let your insurance company inspect the car(free of charge) to decide who is at fault.

  • +18 votes

    Ah yes, the old "I bought a Jeep but I'm too ashamed to let people know I bought a Jeep because I should have listened to the masses that have warned people over and over not to buy a Jeep"

    It's the only logical explanation for hiding the make and model, considering there could be hundreds/thousands of other cars at risk right now.

    But sure, keep your shame to yourself.

    • -1 vote

      grand Cherokee lol?
      poor mans bmw x5/x6

      same as Chrysler 300 poor mans rolls Royce

      • +1 vote

        I'd take a Trackhawk over an X5 anyday, hell even an M50d

    •  

      Sorry it's not a Jeep, and your logic is deeply flawed - to the point where I've explained my position and somehow it still eludes you. And so far there are no other recalls relating to this issue in this model. I appreciate what you're saying, but there is no confirmed risk to others and there is no need to exaggerate.

      •  

        And yet what seems to still elude you after hundreds of replies to your situation, is that it's just the right thing to do.

        If I owned something that put my family at risk of serious injury or death, I wouldn't want anyone else to be put in that position. It's not about exaggerating, it's a heads up that 'hey, go get your car checked, it may be faulty'.

        Just because your vehicle might be the first to experience this issue for that particular model, it doesn't mean it will be the last. This is how recalls work and start. One car triggers an investigation that leads to a proper fault analysis.

        I hope for the sake of the unaware owners of the same model on the road, that yours is a one-off.

        • +1 vote

          Yup. Well explained
          .

        •  

          I also hope it's a one-off. Have you ever worked in anything to do with public relations? Is alerting the public the first thing that's done before gathering the facts?
          If this is indeed the first episode of this issue, and given the number of these vehicles in the road, for it to be a widespread problem would imply a very low incidence rate.
          Furthermore, what exactly are you going to do with the information? Take your car to the dealer and say that someone else's caught on fire, check to see that mine doesn't? What if it's a faulty/perishable plastic, or something else inperceptible to inspection. We have no details to run on and you're asking the dealer to give you all clear without knowing what they're looking for? Do you really think they're going to do anything but show you the door?

          •  

            @Justtip: No you're right, there's absolutely no value in knowing which cars are catching fire under normal use.

            Enjoy!

  • +2 votes

    Contact consumer affairs. I expect you would be entitled to the full cost you paid not just market value.

  • +9 votes

    So stuff like this happens, you have a lucky escape and you don't want to warn others about this possibly happening to them with the same vehicle model?

    Selfish to say the least- you want help from the forum but then you refuse to help others….. who may be utterly unaware of this, and prevent possible tragedy?

    Hmmm decency and morals are sorely lacking here, perhaps its normal for you.

    •  

      I am aware this is a troll comment but let's just play this out:
      I tell you the make of the car.
      Someone who owns the same car reads this.
      Proceeds to panic and take it to their dealer to "get it checked".
      Dealer has no idea what they're talking about, what the issue is, and tells them to go home.

      .. so how how exactly am I to prevent tragedy again?

  • +6 votes

    From normal driving engine temps at hwy speed, suffering a leak in coolant system to destroyed engine can be a short as a few minutes. Assuming the vehicle was in good operational order and all instruments were functioning correctly, as any good driver would check before a 700k trip fully loaded for a house move.
    The 'error' that came up was the dying engine and the ECU giving the warning. This all happened after the temp gauge showed high I would dare say.

    Once the coolant level drops below the Temperature sensor bulb, the system will NOT read an overheat situation.

    Temperature gauge bulbs MUST be immersed in coolant to function. They will not measure the temperature of steam, which is what happens at the onset of a major issue.

    99% of the 1000's of cooked engines I have dealt with in many many years, the drivers are ignorant of the temp gauge needle moving until it is too late. Remember or learn, the range of the needle gauge from normal to hot is less than 10 degrees. Boiling is 100 deg, or less depending the Pressure the system is under, but ultimately 90-100deg is all you have before either Thermal Efficiency is not achieved to cooked and destroyed.

    Deduce that some point during the 700k, highway speed, hot day, full load(moving house), and a few minutes of any system fail or coolant loss and it is all too late. For it to catch fire, it was beyond hot, it was blazing sun hot, driven to destruction. I have performed Forensic investigations for NT Fire, on a Merc Diesel,and a LPG fueled vehicles. Finding absolute guaranteed exacting causes for such an event given the subsequent damage, is quite often a 'most likely' cause found scenario. Be prepared for a no definitive answer.

    Flashy and or modern cars have a gauge, go back to basics and drive a clunker with a big fat red warning light, fit a buzzer alarm on coolant level low mark, and count your lucky stars no one was injured.

    In hindsight………..

    Accept a good offer, and move on, or fight with costs with only a small chance of improving the payout.

    •  

      Once the coolant level drops below the Temperature sensor bulb, the system will NOT read an overheat situation.

      HMmm, this is an interesting point you've made…..perhaps thats the case here…and the driver never got the warning and it was too late when the fire started to happen…?

      IS it possible to installer a pressure gauge and flow meter to ensure coolant levels are right?

      • +1 vote

        That's just means poor design choices, but that's nothing new.

        My guess is its either a Korean or a Chrysler/dodgy SUV

        •  

          As a coolant temperature gauge sensor it is perfect design, it does exactly as it needs to for a sealed coolant system in good order, which if well maintained will last for 1000's of ks.

          That is standard practice for temp sensors since day one. There are options for surface mounted sensors, but these are not a standard as they are more expensive and only compliment the situation in an over heat moment.

          They do not assist the ECU in managing Thermo fans for the AC and or fuel delivery re cold to hot driving ranges etc.

          • +1 vote

            @doctordv8: 10 years or 200k, new radiator, new thermostat, new water pump, new plumbing etc…best practice anyway. At 150k use radiator/block permanent leak seal etc, every 5 years replace radiator cap

            IME I've seen quite a few vehicles that can detect a low or no coolant situation and will go into limp home mode and put Christmas lights up on the dash.

            Think on kickstarter released a bidirectional shop level scan tool for around 1000 AUD recently, bit of a game changer for DIY mechanics (and professionals). They're on eBay too.

      •  

        There are options for surface mounted sensors, but these are not a standard as they are more expensive and only compliment the situation in an over heat moment.

        They do not assist the ECU in managing Thermo fans for the AC and or fuel delivery re cold to hot driving ranges etc.

        A pressure gauge…not heard of that concept, as it will be zero Psi cold, and only 8-16Psi at full hot. The small variance may not be accurate enough to be effective,. Mind, if hot at full pressure and a sudden loss is detected, this could trigger an alarm, but again, at full hot to destroyed is a very short time span, and may not be helpful as damage has already occurred.

        • +1 vote

          There are options for surface mounted sensors, but these are not a standard as they are more expensive and only compliment the situation in an over heat moment.

          Well at least you'll be able to tell the temerpature of the engine when the sensor for the coolant temp doesnt work….

          A pressure gauge…not heard of that concept, as it will be zero Psi cold, and only 8-16Psi at full hot. The small variance may not be accurate enough to be effective,. Mind, if hot at full pressure and a sudden loss is detected, this could trigger an alarm, but again, at full hot to destroyed is a very short time span, and may not be helpful as damage has already occurred.

          I was thinking maybe as to prevent the cap from blowing off or piping with too much pressure…. Oh wait, that's relief valve, right? Pressure gauge is only for seeing what coolant pressure you got in the closed loop…? Still be good for statistical or curiosity purposes, seing how it goes up and down whilst driving…

          •  

            @Zachary: Arhhhh, in a perfect world.

            99% of drivers are oblivious to all instruments. So many hot Engines. So many speeding. So many driving with no headlights. so many with little or no indicators.

            What you describe is for the 1 in 10 thousand mechanically minded and real drivers (not just blind passengers behind the steering wheel)….of which there are very few of us around.

    •  

      Nope, no other warnings as per the onboard computer

  • +6 votes

    I can neither confirm nor deny it's a Jeep.

    So it's a Jeep

    •  

      Nope. I'm giving in to peer pressure and confirming it is NOT a Jeep.

  • +2 votes

    God, what a pain to go through. My ford’s reverse gear stopped functioning all of a sudden. I could only go forward. I picked a local mechanic where I don’t have to do a reverse. He found out an issue in transmission, quoted $3000 minimum and asked me to leave the car with him. I came back home found out certain issues are covered by Ford for 10 years. The ford dealers close by said they were booked for next whole months. I found a slot a week away in a far away dealer and booked in. Hired a car on ‘car next door’ for the days we needed a car. Fortunately, Car was fixed under warranty by Ford. Though the ordeal did only cost me around $200, the time and tension wanted me to get rid of the car and never leave the house. Imagine driving a car that would only go forward in a highway for almost 100km. I should have had a Road assistant package. But, comparing to what op had gone through mine is negligible.

    • +2 votes

      Hmmm would you have driven 100km in reverse if you could?

      •  

        Scary memories….Lost forward gears in an auto. I did one side of Wagga to the other…..as stupid teen….at night. How we did not die still confounds me. Mind, followed all…..arh…most of the road & lane rules…just oh I tremble still thinking about it.

    •  

      You're right about the time and tension! Fingers crossed we get a good outcome like you did!

  • +1 vote

    no make, no model, no story

  •  

    is it a subaru, there are recalls

    https://www.consumerreports.org/consumerist/subaru-recalls-1...

    not knowing make model is not helpful

    •  

      Op says car is 2.5 years old. Link says newest car this happened to is 2014… Maths doesn’t work out

  • +1 vote

    Why would you not say at least what brand it is FFS

    fiat Chrysler have an absolutely awful reputation on warranty claims

    Sounds like you are ashamed

    You deserve everything you get if you bought a jeep branded car.

  • +2 votes

    Brand, make model?

  • +1 vote

    2.5yr old car, well looked after and regularly serviced, spontaneously caught fire while driving on freeway.

    your profile says you are in Adelaide, so I guess it wasn't you, but a week or two ago there was another newish Toyota (i think) 4WD/SUV which caught fire on the Sydney-Newcastle freeway, hopefully it is not a widespread problem.

  • +3 votes

    Ask the fire brigade and the crash repairer for their photos of the car. It's highly likely they will have one with the engine bay opened and you can see if the radiator cap is still on.

    • +1 vote

      The fire brigade does not routinely take photos of fires.

  • +1 vote

    Can OP upload photos of the burnt car?

    • +1 vote

      Just uploaded the underside

  • +2 votes

    tell us which brand tho

  •  

    It's pointless asking them to look more. They've made up there mind. You could ask for the regional tech guy from HO to get involved.

    Otherwise, you need to employ an independent 3rd party to assess the vehicle and provide a written report.

    https://ssht.com.au/

    https://www.mobilityengineering.com.au/services/expert-witne...

    Then you have to fight them.

  • +5 votes

    Absence of details, as well as the dodgy OP leads me to think this is a troll thread.

    Pathetic

    • +1 vote

      Me too, why OP is hiding details crucial for discussion

    •  

      Sorry if I seem dodgy. Not sure what else to do about that

  • +1 vote

    Ever since I saw the video of a Russian man trapped in his car and burnt slowly alive, this haunts me till date. I've never forgotten the screams. OP I'm glad you and your wife are safe. Please take the engine heat warnings seriously everyone.

    •  

      Link?

      • -1 vote

        facebook removed it.