Average Speed Cameras - Only for Heavy Vehicles?

Have driven the Pacific Highway, north of Sydney to north coast a couple of times recently. There are a number of Average Speed Cameras along the way.

A couple of times I missed a speed limit change from 110-100km/h (yes, I know) and was wondering whether I may get a fine in the mail due to over average speed because I sit right on the posted limit, from GPS and on cruise control. Also did not know which one was starting the section or ending it. They used to be signed as start and end.

When I searched about the cameras it appears they are only used for heavy vehicles - something the signs don’t make you aware of.

Is the heavy vehicles only thing widely known?
Does anyone have other knowledge on these ‘safety’ cameras?

Comments

  • +1 vote

    My feeling is they're not there for 10kms over limit. They're there for people doing way over.

    •  

      It does make me wonder, if your consistently speeding and backing off and speeding again is the tolerance for your average quite low? Ie if it’s a 5km section and you are over by 20km/h for 500m (average over by 2km/h) does that trigger it?

      if it is targeting trucks with limiters, they shouldn’t be over by 1km/h on average.

  •  

    I always try my best to stay on speed limit. But I'll also sometimes drive a little under if no one behind me as I'm super paranoid. Especially in the roadwork areas where it seems no one follows speed limits

    •  

      On a long distance drive like up the dual carriageway pacific hwy setting the cruise at max means you aren’t driving for as long. It’s that that long straight and boring I want it over as soon as possible.

      •  

        It’s that that long straight and boring I want it over as soon as possible.

        Sydney to Brisbane is ~917kms, which according to Google should take you ~9hrs 24mins if you left right now.

        917kms @ 100km/hr = 9hrs 10.2mins
        917kms @ 110km/hr = 8hrs 20.2mins

        That 10km/hr saves you 50mins.

        Another way of looking at it is 100→110 is 10%. You'll save (at most) 10% on your travel time.

        Is that 10% worth the cost? Knowing that that cost could be one of:

        • Nothing
        • Speeding fine
        • Someone's life (potentially your own; potentially multiple)

        And you don't (necessarily) get to choose which.

        •  

          At most I’m saving 3%, but it’s more like 1 or 2%. However, if I compare to setting it conservatively 5km/h under then it’s 6-8%.

          True, it’s not much but 20min less of boredom is a good thing.

          I’d much rather take the New England Hwy where the road is more ‘dangerous’ but at the same time more engaging to drive. I know I get distracted by shiny things when it’s ‘too easy’ to drive.

  • +4 votes

    What are you driving? Only heavy vehicles and trailers with a Gross Vehicle Mass greater than 4.5 tonnes are subject to average speed enforcement.

    •  

      Just a car. I know that now, but didn’t until I looked up on RMS website. The signs don’t indicate heavy vehicles only like they used to.

      • +4 votes

        Dont give Gladys any ideas… next NSW Parliament pay rise funded by point to point speed cameras.

        • +1 vote

          It is on the agenda.

  •  

    Unless they have changed the rules lately, average speeds cameras in NSW target large vehicles (ie. trucks) - they record cars exceeding average speed limit but don't enforce a fine.

  • +4 votes
    •  

      6. Can this technology be used for detecting speeding cars?

      Average speed enforcement is only used to enforce heavy vehicle speeding. Fixed, red-light and mobile speed cameras are used to enforce light vehicle speeding, while NSW Police continue to enforce speeding across the road network.

  • -2 votes

    was wondering wether I may get a fine in the mail

    yes

  • -2 votes

    Don't confuse the (truck) safety cameras with the average speed camera.

    On the drive up to the Central Coast (on the M1), there is both (truck) safety cameras near the Mt White weigh bridge and also an average speed camera that begins on the uphill section of the M1, just after the Brooklyn bridge. The section of road that the average speed camera is on is a 90/100km/h (90km/h when raining) section of road.

  •  

    How about the downhill on Mt Ousley heading south towards Wollongong?
    Is that a HV one too?! I’ve been so paranoid on that one every single time…

    •  

      Pretty sure that one is HV only

  • -1 vote

    It depends on the state. In NSW I've done 10-15km/h over the limit driving up from Sydney to Coffs and seems to be okay.

    In Perth, I've done 19km/h over the limit driving back to Perth from Margaret River - got the fine in the mail 3 weeks later. I can be that specific as it was measured as such by the average speed camera…

    • +1 vote

      I was going to say that the only average speed camera zone I am aware of is between Bunbury and Mandurah in WA and it is not just for heavy vehicles and they are pretty strict on limits.

  • +4 votes

    Public Notice - Don't forget to run the Waze app when you drive and report speed-traps / hazards / construction work

    Thanks

    • -3 votes

      Public Notice - Don't use your phone while driving.

      • +3 votes

        Depending on the state you're ok to use it in a commercially sold mount for navigation. Not sure how many touches are needed in Waze to report a camera.

      • +5 votes

        Personally, I've found the law a bit inconsistent. Using a touch screen for the radio is pretty risky especially compared to tactile buttons.

        • +4 votes

          Agree that touchscreens in cars are a bad idea. You always have to look at the screen before you touch. Tactile buttons can be done without taking your eyes off the road.

          • +2 votes

            @Euphemistic: 100% agree. I reckon they undo all the other good work in safety tech with these screens alone.

          •  

            @Euphemistic: Most modern cars with touch screens are no different from phone imho, I drive a 2015 good Mondeo and have plenty of on screen buttons for climate, navigation, audio,… Not to mention the steering button tutors for which you have to look at the dashboard to see what option you're pressing… All of these are distracting and dangerous but I guess they have to draw a line somewhere….

            •  

              @Waltervp: To play devil's advocate. Phones are smaller and easier to reach and people are more familiar with the location of controls.

              Texting is still a big no no though.

    •  

      Google Maps has this feature now, I swear I saw that when I last used it on iOS

      •  

        Yep, has been in the Goog maps app for at least a couple of years.

  •  

    From my experience in perth, I tested one(yes I am a fool) by travelling 4 km/h over the speed limit which I know doesn't trigger fixed speed cameras and sure enough, the average fixed camera didn't nab me. Maybe it wasn't turned on or something but it seems to have an equal or higher tolerance than normal fixed cameras.

    • +2 votes

      Are you sure about your speed? Speedos in cars can be out by up to 10% - so you may have thought you were over by 4kph, but not actually been.

      •  

        It's not a percentage, that would vary with speed, it's a fixed amount by my observations. It's 2-10km/hr relative speed difference. My current cars are 2 and 8 km/hr away from true, quite shabby!

        I have calibrated each car, so in the above scenario, I was sitting on 112 kmhr on the speedo, which is 104 irl. GPS provides poor absolute accuracy but impeccable relative accuracy over distance and I rely on that to work it out. I regularly go through speed cameras in various cars testing when they will flash, I've got it up to 5 kmhr over the speed limit (too expensive to push any further) but usually leave it at 4 to be safe for day to day camera dodging. This only works in Perth, I'm unsure whether the tolerance would vary between states.

  •  

    I’ve driven all over Australia and almost without fail there is roadworks between points. I wouldn’t worry too much about it. I don’t know anybody who has ever had a ticket from them. And I’ve asked plenty on the journey.

    • +1 vote

      I used to issue them. I would do 150 per week.

      •  

        That proves my point. Compared to fixed speed cameras that is negligible. Thank you.

  •  

    I act asleep at the wheel… no one is really checking these cameras.

    •  

      Because it’s just an automated number plate recognition thing?

    •  

      I had a person wanting to get off a ticket for crossing a double line etc. I couldn't figure out how the officer seen the guy when he stopped him 30kms away.

      I rang the issuing officer to find out how, he was watching the live monitor in a weigh station miles away on a break.

      •  

        Foul!! Nobody should work on their break.

  •  

    Average speed limit cameras are not just for heavy vehicles.

    "Safe-T" cameras, are however (there's a lot less of these, but they're used for ensuring compliance to fatigue management regs.

    •  

      Average speed limit cameras are not just for heavy vehicles.

      Evidently they are only for heavy vehicles, in NSW at least.

      I know here in ACT the 1 average speed camera (which is on a steep up/down hill section, go figure) looks at all vehicles and not just heavy. But the one on the highway to Sydney is heavy vehicles only.

      https://roadsafety.transport.nsw.gov.au/speeding/speedcamera... - point 5