Automotive Scam Advice

Advice needed.

Two days ago, I received a txt from a constable from the Queanbeyan Police (Monaro District). He told me that someone had lodged a police complaint that I had scratched her car, at a shopping centre carpark by backing into her, and did not leave my details. I told the police that I did not crash into any cars, backed up by my wife as a passenger. I told him that when I parked the car, I retract my wing mirrors and drove straight into the bay. On leaving, the space in front of me was empty and I drove straight ahead through. He claimed that the woman alleges that her daughter was in her car while she was elsewhere shopping, and there was a witness, and she took some photos. I told him that is incorrect, I did not reverse at all during the whole parking procedure, and why did she, or the witness not leave a message on my vehicle if they think I did the deed. The police then said that I can be charged for not exchanging details but I said that there was no crash, and there was no one to exchange details with. The so called witness did not approach me but the police said she does not have to. The incident was supposed to have taken place 4-5 days prior.

Anyway, advice on what actions I should take. Also seeking the following information. Can the police in NSW charged someone for not exchanging details in a private car park (shopping centre's), when I did not believe that I had an accident, no one approach me to ask for my details ,e tc. I am meeting with the police next Wednesday to look at photos. What information do I need to give to the police; apart from my name and address. Do I need to give him my mobile no (which he has obviously as he rang me) and my insurance company? I requested the police report in order to prepare my Defence but the police told me that I have to pay $40. Also, the woman alleges he left her young daughter alone in her parked car. Is that an offence under NSW law? I wonder why the police didn't charge her for that when she made that statement to them.

Also, apart from my wife, earlier that day, I took my car to an autoelectrician and a body shop, to get quotes on fixing a fault, I went back to them after the police phone call and they can testify that there has been no indication that the car was involved in a skirmish since I last brought it to them.

Any advice is appreciated, I am stressed out. I have two instances of such in
Sydney, two in Canberra, and now the current one in Queanbeyan NSW. That's because I own four upmarket cars, a Porshce, Mercedes, Lexus and BMW, and being Asian, these people approach me claiming all sorts of misdeeds on my part, and demanding money. I have fobbed all of them off, by asking him for the Drivers's Licences. But this time, there is a police report. The constable told me that he rather have me provide the details to him so that the insurance companies can do their part, rather than him charging me for not exchanging information.

Thanks again

Comments

  • +125 votes

    Since when police has started sending text messaging and delivering justice….

    Sounds dodgy as f$&$…

    • +18 votes

      How would the police have your phone number?

      • +8 votes

        If they have a registration, they could easily get the mobile number of the person who registered the vehicle in that state.

        Do you think it's unreasonable that the police would have access to your phone number?

        From my comment below:

        I travel a lot for work, including internationally. Early last year I was met by QLD Police to be issued with a quarantine directive, they had an ipad and confirmed my name, DOB, resdential address and mobile number, all without me providing it to them previously. I asked how they had it (out of curiosity, not because I live with a tin foil on my head) and they just said it's all linked in with multiple government databases.

        For the record it wasn't a commercial flight, and the QLD Police had no details of the crew or passengers on the aircraft. When we travel internationally our work liaises with QLD Police to get them out to the airport and process us for our arrivals.

      • +2 votes

        I just logged into DOT (our version of DIT) and my phone number is there under contact details.

      • +1 vote

        I was driving to work for a night shift one day, lets say a bit spiritied-ly driving, no cars on the road except for one i overtook (they were driving 15km under the limit), next thing i know i got a phone call from the local station checking to make sure my car wasn't stolen - the car i overtook was an off duty cop and thought my spirited overtaking was indicative of a that of a theif's. Was quite funny.

      •  

        The police have access to your phone. I lost my drivers license once and it had my address but not my mobile, someone handed it to a police beat. They called me on my work issued mobile which was registered to my employer. I was puzzled

      •  

        I can't speak for other states, but in NSW the police have access to all information recorded by Transport for NSW (TfNSW) for the registered owner.

    • +9 votes

      i actually butt dialed 000 once
      and i got called by the local police station, then by a officer on mobile
      then left a SMS and a voicemail

      i was surprised
      and embarrassed

      • -1 vote

        i actually butt dialed 000 once

        Perhaps it was an accident waiting to happen. I'd bring a spare pair whenever you're out just in case.

    • +2 votes

      They have been texting me regarding some issue. So police does send text messages. I was surprised too

  • +6 votes

    I have two instances of such in Sydney, two in Canberra, and now the current one in Queanbeyan NSW. That's because I own four upmarket cars, a Porshce, Mercedes, Lexus and BMW, and being Asian, these people approach me claiming all sorts of misdeeds on my part, and demanding money.

    You need to buy a lottery ticket.

    Go to the police station in the car that was said involved, let the police inspect the vehicle. Then get them to inspect the other vehicle. If there is contact then the evidence doesn't lie. You phone probably is tracking everywhere you've been, were you even at that location? If not use your phone data and any receipts to demonstrate you could not have been there.

    Best if you just remain calm and go with the process.

    • +3 votes

      He might have already won the lottery to be able to afford 4 upmarket cars.

      • +3 votes

        Credit is cheap.
        Very cheap … for now, of course.

      • +1 vote

        Maybe he banks with Westpac.

    • -1 vote

      You phone probably is tracking everywhere you've been, were you even at that location?

      Turn location off and walah - no one can track where you've been with your phone.

      •  
        • voila.
        •  

          OH, its that how it's spelt?

  • +20 votes

    Are you sure that it's a legitimate text?

  • +18 votes

    And when the police text you, what do you say?
    Nothing, because it's "shut the (fropanity) up Friday"

    Really? The police sent you a text message? And you replied to it?? LoL.

    • -1 vote

      What I think has happened, is the cops want OP to swap info with the driver, and avoid the hit and run paperwork. Hence the text.

      • +5 votes

        Not sure why the negs.

        Police officer in Victoria and can confirm that is how it works down here

        In the first instance, if it is minor and there an no injuries, we facilitate in the exchange of details for it to be sorted out through insurance companies. If they refuse to exchange details, then we provide the other party their details anyway via hit and run reports and they also get charged with failing to exchange details.

        Unfortunately for OP, if there is an independent witness saying they observed him hit the other car, he might be out of luck. An independent witness counts for much more at law then a party directly involved

        Also, we send text messages all the time asking people to call us back if they don't answer their phone.

    • +2 votes

      My sister in law got sent a text by the police because someone alleged her of being a thief. She had to go her local police station and give her statement. And it wasn’t a scam.

      • -3 votes

        Yeah… I’m not buying it. Accused of being a thief and saying if she didn’t contact them they would issue a warrant… (Got a feeling an arrest warrant is a bit harder to get then just plucking one out of their arse.)

        For something as serious as theft, I’m banking on that being done via a phone call at a minimum, maybe even a visit from a detective or two.

        They would know that someone receiving a message like that from a random number, most people would just laugh and delete it.

        • +2 votes

          You don’t have to believe me. All I know was that I was there when the text came through as we were having dinner. It got the constable name and the location of her local police station. She ended up going to court on that particular case. The CCTV footage they used ended up being the wrong person. Also the thef was about a pair of Nike shoes so go figure.

          But sure, call me a liar because I actually have seen it. 😂

  • +16 votes

    Did you conversation with the police occur by text, or did you ring the number from the text?

    Did you search for the Queanbeyan Police (Monaro District) phone number, then ask if there is an officer by the name of the person who supposedly sent the text?

    If such an officer does exist, ask to speak to them.

    If you spoke to a person using the number from the text message, you can not be sure that you are actually speaking to a police officer.

  • +21 votes

    I received a txt from a constable from the Queanbeyan Police

    Scam scam scam

    police told me that I have to pay $40.

    WTF OP. This is rubbish.

    Any advice is appreciated, I am stressed out.

    Delete text message and get on with your life.

    This has to be a troll post for sure.

    I have a 2008 Lexus RX400H

  • +5 votes

    He claimed that the woman alleges that her daughter was in her car while she was elsewhere shopping, and there was a witness, and she took some photos.

    If you claim there was no collision, as the police for evidence it occurred. Otherwise, it's a 'he said - she said' situation, going no where.

  • +15 votes

    so many holes in both stories. I think there is an element of bluff from the cop, BUT there I dont think you are being entirely straight with what has been written.

    That's because I own four upmarket cars, a Porshce, Mercedes, Lexus and BMW, and being Asian, these people approach me claiming all sorts of misdeeds on my part, and demanding money.

    If this is true, why dont you have a dashcam?

    • +12 votes

      Because the upmarket Lexus is a a 2008 Lexus RX400H

      Lol - a new Yaris is more than this and probably has more tech and upmarket appeal

      • +5 votes

        haha so its work about 12k now.

        Still a $40 dashcam would have solved the problem, irrispective of the value of the car

    • +6 votes

      Lol this was my thought too. 4 “upmarket cars” yet no dash cam I find pretty unbelievable.

    •  

      My Porsche and Lexus have reversing cameras but not my Merc and BMW as they were older models. My wife has constantly asked me to fit cameras front and back, which in the light of this, I will

      • +4 votes

        reversing cameras are not the same as a dashcam.

        Reversing cameras are a live camera that looks behind, and helps you park. These generally dont have recording functionality

        Dashcams arent connected to a screen and constantly record when the car is on. So there would be footage of you reversing into the other car (or not).

        Given you've had this issue 3 times prior, i tend to believe you're not as innocent as you think you might be. Just because you didnt feel a hit, doesnt mean it didnt happen.

        • +1 vote

          I play WOT and when I roll over a car with my KV-2 I dont feel a thing.

      •  

        I own four upmarket cars, a Porshce, Mercedes, Lexus and BMW

        And

        My Porsche and Lexus have reversing cameras but not my Merc and BMW as they were older models.

        How can you consider upmarket with no reversing camera? Merc and BMW must be more than 10 years old or you buying the base A class/1 series for the badge.

    • +1 vote

      Plenty of people who own expensive cars don’t have dashcams.

  •  

    How did he get your phone number?

    Unless you already have an EVENT on COPS database.

    • +3 votes

      you think the cops dont have access to the rta data base?

      Few years ago someones motorbike got knocked over, was left that way for days, called the LAC and gave them the plate, he called the owner while we were on hold

    • +1 vote

      Wrong.

      NSW Police has access to both the TfNSW and RNSW databases - both of which contain mobile phone numbers and other contact information (personal and business).

  • +3 votes

    I smell Bullsh!t

  • +6 votes

    OzLegal:

    What did the cop say when you went to the police station asking for the person who texted you ???

    •  

      He was not there. I rang the Police Help Line using a phone at the station. They Help Line then rang the police station and another constable came to the counter. He seems to have all the details. He told me to come back in 30 mins, which I did, but the constable who txt me said he was held up. So, I left.

  • +4 votes

    Swap your cars to corollas and/or camrys. Future problems solved.

  • +6 votes

    Post screenshots of messages from NSW police.

    I am meeting with the police next Wednesday to look at photos

    Given this, I assume you are meeting a uniformed officer, inside a police station, and not some guy 'undercover' out the front of a cafe? Did you physically speak to them on the phone?

    The constable told me that he rather have me provide the details to him so that the insurance companies can do their part, rather than him charging me for not exchanging information.

    I will play devil's advocate here though. My dad was a police officer, he used to tell me 90% of his job was writing out paperwork on every little detail. If he could avoid it by finding other solutions, he did. SO it's not unreasonable for an oficer to recommend you do option a, so they don't need to go down road b. FWIW, I would believe most officers want a good outcome, and they probably don't enjoy writing out infringements as much as people assume they do. So maybe they really are trying to help you, themselves and (if they exist) the other party in one hit. The bit I do find strange about it is the fact they texted you. I would expect the police to call at an absolute minimum, and if you didn't answer, and a police report was made, I would expect them to be paying you a house visit.

    Also for those who are asking how the police get your number, many ways. From as simple as in a database of records, to sending a warrant to a telecommunications company. I travel a lot for work, including internationally. Early last year I was met by QLD Police to be issued with a quarantine directive, they had an ipad and confirmed my name, DOB, resdential address and mobile number, all without me providing it to them previously. I asked how they had it (out of curiosity, not because I live with a tin foil on my head) and they just said it's all linked in with multiple government databases.

    Put it this way… what is more likely? a police officer getting access to your mobile number, or a random is trying to scam you and went to great detail to know where you were on a particular day, the car you drive and somehow also got your mobile number. If you think it's the latter, I'd be worried about more scams or data breaches coming your way.

  • +3 votes

    Call the police station to confirm

  • +5 votes

    Lol the police don't text you. Common sense people, please try to use it.

    • +8 votes

      No they do in Victoria. Was asked to go to police station and I did confirmed it

    • +2 votes

      They do, normally there's police fluff around it the message.

    • +4 votes

      Lol they certainly do. Common sense people, if the text asks you to turn yourself in at a local station because they want to speak to you. It’s probably legit.

      If it asks for payment, then tell them to go get fk.

      • +1 vote

        Yeah, I wouldn't be going into the station or answering "police" in a text message. What next, they'll contact people via twitter?

        •  

          My sister in law got contacted by a Constable via text dued to someone alleged her of thef. Got told to contact her local police station or a warrant would be issued. She turned up and gave her statement. The local police station had the case with all her files. She ended up going to court because the CCTV got her in it but turned out to be a wrong person.

          Of course you don’t have to believe that. I didn’t either but that’s what happened. We were having dinner when that text came through.

        •  

          Apparently Police do Twitter

    • +5 votes

      Police officer in Victoria and can confirm we text people all the time when they dont answer.

      • -10 votes

        Just another problem with Victoria then I suppose. Texting people is so unprofessional it's not funny. Do cops not realise that this looks like a scam, and makes it easier for people to scam others by normalising this?

        • +1 vote

          How is it unprofessional? Last one I got looked like this:

          "<Name>, please call S/C <Name> at <Place> CIU <Phone Number>. Thanks"

  • +7 votes

    What does being Asian have to do with anything?

    • +7 votes

      OP has had issue this issue 3 times before. As hes "innocent" , he thinks it's a race thing.

      If OP has 4 vehicles in his name, he should start registering them in the real drivers name, and make the true owners responcible for their actions.

      The whole thing smells a bit fishy to me, 4 instances of hit and runs against his name, yet he hasnt taken any measures to protect himself.

      • +3 votes

        Yeah im pretty sure it's not normal for people to make multiple fake claims against you just because you have what you consider an upmarket car.. agree something very fishy/ unusual..

    • +1 vote

      I was approached in Eastwood and Cabramatta Sydney; and in Belconnen Mall and Bruce Medical Centre Car parks by people who wants me to pay them claiming that I scratched their cars. I asked for their drivers licence which they refused. I them told them that they have my no plate and I have theirs; and drove off. Haven't heard from then since. The first three instances were Asians, the fourth wasn't. I do not know the ethnicity of the latest at Queanbeyan because the police wants $40 for the report; my insurer can ask for that and pay for it. For those who are unaware, there has been many scams where Asians have been scammed out of money by people who rang and said that they are police/authorities, and if they do not pay up, they will go to prison. For some context

      • -9 votes

        Lol. OP firstly pulls out the race card, and then openly admits that in 3 of 4 prior incidents he was targeted by Asians (the same background he states for himself). And then again goes on to claim that "Asians have been scammed" etc. Apparently this guy is always the victim!

        • +9 votes

          There are definitely Asians out there who target Asians for scams etc it's not uncommon

        •  

          "Asians" covers an enormous range of nationalities and ethnicities, dude. No reason to believe the "asians" who gave our "asian" OP trouble were of the same background.

          And you are absolutely blind if you do not think plenty of people in Australia (yes, including "asians") are flat out racists. Sure racists' particular target varies, but some targets are much more popular than others.

          • +1 vote

            @derrida derider: It was OP who lumped himself into the "Asian" category, and likewise did so for those he alleges tried to scam him. Clearly therefore, he is the one who considers them one and the same for the purposes of his story, which frankly, is just a load of utter BS anyway.

          •  

            @derrida derider: Asian should do a yellow lives matter movement so the issue gets as well known as black lives.

      • +2 votes

        Asian Driver vs Asian Scammer … who to believe?

    •  

      It's obviously a racist-based incident. /s

      •  

        Maybe OP is an Asian celebrity, hence “random” people would act that way towards him/her.

      •  

        No it's not OBVIOUSLY a racist based incident. But you are a fool if you do not think it is POSSIBLE it is - there's a lot of it about.

        •  

          So the 'Minority Report' is a documentary now, who needs facts when suspicion and 'possibility' is sufficient for claims and allegations. Just WOW.

      •  

        Can see that most people don't know what /s is.

        Maybe most folks think it is a command line switch e.g. dir/s

      •  

        Agreed. I am pretty sure it's a hate crime.

  • -1 vote

    Why are you even asking op? Its obvious you should pay

    • +1 vote

      Forgot to add the /s mate.
      Sarcasm doesn't work well on the intertubes because it is never as obvious to others as you think.

  • +2 votes

    Seriously OP - police getting directly involved in a minor car scratch at a shopping centre? Really? Would Queanbeyan cops have no other public security priorities that they can text back and forth with you?

  • +13 votes

    I own four upmarket cars, a Porshce, Mercedes, Lexus and BMW, and being Asian

    Strange flex but ok.

    • -13 votes

      being Asian

      Percent of Survey Participants Who Were Victims of Fraud (US based)

      Ethnicity Percent Victims
      Hispanics 18.0%
      African Americans 20.0%
      American Indians, including Alaskan natives 16.6%
      Asian 10.2%
      Non-Hispanic whites [comparison group] 12.0%
      Others 20.8%

      Source: https://www.ftc.gov/sites/default/files/documents/reports/co...

      • +33 votes

        Strange flex quoting US stats that have no relevance for Australia, but ok.

    • +1 vote

      see above reply. This is the 5th time I have had people who approached me to pay them for scratches.

  • +5 votes

    upmarket cars

    Your Lexus is a 2008, what's the Merc, a 2004 c180?

    • +3 votes

      Yep, and a 1995 BMW 316i.

      • +2 votes

        And a 1998 Porsche Boxster…

        • +6 votes

          2.5L auto to boot

    • -5 votes

      2005 ML320

      • +16 votes

        Yeah, that's not upmarket champ. A bit embarrassing to call a 13 year old Lexus, and a 16 year old base model ml "upmarket".

        •  

          Let him be, he wants to feel rich and powerful.

      • +5 votes

        You call your shoebox apartment a condo, don’t you?

  • +1 vote

    I've heard of people copying the number plate of exact same make and model to avoid driving issues?
    A long time ago Carsales website used to list the number plate details making it easy to find a matching vehicle.

  • +7 votes

    "I have two instances of such in Sydney, two in Canberra, and now the current one in Queanbeyan NSW. That's because I own four upmarket cars, a Porshce, Mercedes, Lexus and BMW, and being Asian, these people approach me claiming all sorts of misdeeds on my part, and demanding money."

    I'm just going to go ahead and say it - if you are repeatedly being accused of damaging peoples' cars (in multiple states, no less), you most likely are and attempting to blame racism in an effort to get people onside.

    What on earth does having 'upmarket' cars have to do with anything? Is there an unspoken rule that people with expensive cars are more likely to pay out on scam accusations?

    Post doesn't make any sense.

    •  

      But at least OP folds wing mirrors in before parking. How kind.

      • +1 vote

        Might explain why they keep backing in to cars…