Bunning Price Match Policy - Contraditory Wording

Had an issue with a Bunnings store, not price matching an Amazon item (fulfilled by Amazon AU via Amazon AU), which was in stock and available for delivery (ETA next day in Sydney, a Saturday no less!). The staff members including a store manager (he claims he was anyway) told me that they don't price match if the item can't be delivered in the same day, as per their red price match poster. I have never heard this excuse before. They pointed to the price match poster, the poster's exact wording is: "if you find a competitor's lower price (including GST and delivery charges) on the same in-stock item that’s available for same-day delivery or collection, we'll beat it by 10%".

Is the staff right that the policy only applies to items that can be delivered on the same day?

However, on Bunnings' webpage Price Policy, the first paragraph states that "Our lowest prices policy applies to any lower price on an item that is in-stock and available for delivery or collection on the same day from a competitor’s online or physical store in Australia". This clearly is contrary to the words in the poster and the second paragraph on the same website, which quotes the "…same-day delivery" again.

With these confusing terms for a price policy, Bunnings can basically use this as they like to refuse any online based stores, as other than Amazon, I haven't had items that can be delivered on the same day. IMO, this makes their claim that they match online stores (Ebay, Kogan, Catch etc) a false claim really.

Please let us know your own comprehension of the language used in the policy by voting in the poll.

Poll Options expired

  • 24
    .
  • 6
    Price match is only available for in-stock items that is **available for delivery** on the same day.
  • 41
    Price match is only available for items that can be **delivered/collected** on the same day.

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Comments

  • +1 vote

    First I've seen of these new terms. I've had trouble with bunnings price beating Amazon before but that was sorted out with call to their support agents. Would suggest you do the same.

    • +1 vote

      I just went to another store which price matched, no problems. It's just frustrating that the ambiguity in the policy wording is creating different outcomes.

      • +4 votes

        I don't think it's ambiguous, it's just that some managers will be more lenient than others.

        It's like if you're caught speeding. Technically the police should fine you, but some will let you off with a warning. You shouldn't be pissed at the ones that stick to the rules, you should be grateful for the ones that let it slide.

        • -2 votes

          From my point of view (avaiable for delivery on the same day =/ same-day delivery), taking your analogy, it's like I wasn't speeding, but one police says I was and fined me, while another time, I was doing the same speed (not speeding in my opinion) another officer didn't fine me. Should I be grateful that the second officer let it slide or should I be pissed that the first officer? It's a matter of perspective.

          •  

            @assailantsky:

            From my point of view (avaiable for delivery on the same day =/ same-day delivery)

            They don't specifically define "delivery" , it could also be about giving birth.

            •  

              @Ughhh: Yep, as someone said below, it's about context! Haha. Price match a baby will need more brains than Bunnings have on offer. (In no way as an offence to Bunnings' staff)

      •  

        No ambiguity. Why would anyone qualify available for delivery with 'on the same day' and not intend it to mean it can be delivered on that day?

        The only alternative interpretation I can see would be a convoluted way to say 'available for purchase'.

        •  

          The only alternative interpretation I can see would be a convoluted way to say 'available for purchase'.

          Seems that's the case.

  • +11 votes

    available for delivery or collection on the same day

    You need to read the whole sentence.

    •  

      Imo, available for i) delivery on the same day, is different to, ii) delivered on the same day. One being able to be sent today, the other being received today.

      • +10 votes

        Nah. They're the same thing. You might like them to be different, but it's pretty clear.

        Basically Bunnings are saying we've gone to effort to have a retail outlet, have the stuff in stock that you can walk away with, and provide staff that can give advice … that sh!t costs money … if you want it now take our prices and move on, otherwise wait for the thing to be delivered.

        • -4 votes

          I find it weird that we are having this confusion regarding the words delivery and delivered. According to the dictionary (take your pick), delivery is a noun, meaning the action of delivering letters, parcels, or goods.

          Delivered, is obviously not delivering…, or at least that's my understanding.

          • +2 votes

            @assailantsky: Yeah - you are still wrong.
            Available for delivery is not the same as available for shipping.
            One involves sending, the other receiving.

            • +1 vote

              @Almost Banned: Yah, not really. Available for delivery means its available for the process of delivering the parcel. You are mixing "take delivery" with "available for delivery". The first involves receiving, the second means the process of getting the item to you, both of which can start on the same day as the price match.

          • +4 votes

            @assailantsky: Delivery as a concept includes the other party receiving the item. It's a different concept from 'sending', for instance. I can send you a parcel that you never received, but I can't deliver you a parcel that you never received.

            Likewise I can send a parcel on Monday that is received on Monday/Tuesday/never, but there's only one way for a parcel to be delivered on Monday, and that's the day it arrives.

            • +1 vote

              @CrowReally: I think you are introducing words and meaning into the discussion to prove your point, they don't say deliver, it's delivery. I understand why it is easy to make that mistake between a verb and a noun.

              Like you said, delivery is a concept that involves both sending and receiving, one can start the process of delivering a parcel (available for delivery) on the same day as the price match. Using your example, if it is delivered on Monday (day of price match). When did the delivery (process of delivering) start? Monday. If it is delivered on Tuesday, when did the delivery start? Monday. Was the item available for the delivery on Monday? Yes it was.

              •  

                @assailantsky: "Available for delivery on day X" means it will be arriving on day X, not that you are going to be able to start sending it on day X. The verb/noun thing is not relevant to this discussion, both the verb deliver and the noun delivery are chained to the concept of the item itself arriving, being delivered. When your postman says "I have a delivery for you", using the noun, he is saying "I have an [item that is being delivered] for you" not "I have an [action of delivering letters] for you".

                It's impossible for something to be received (delivered) without it being sent in the first place, but that doesn't make the time and date of whenever it began to be sent part of the definition of "what a delivery is". I feel like you're trying to crowbar "sending" into the definition of delivery. "I began delivering something, then there was some delays, and it arrived a few days later" is a legitimate sentence, but the delivery only occurred a few days later.

                Note the use of "in- ransit" in the following sentence (Stolen from a courier/postal service page) to clearly define a stage that occurs before "delivery":

                "When your shipment is in transit, it means the courier company picked the parcel up and your shipment is on its way to the delivery address. The package stays in transit until the driver delivers it"

                •  

                  @CrowReally: Using your example "I began delivering something, then there was some delays, and it arrived a few days later", was the item available for delivery on the day you began delivering it to me?

                  •  

                    @assailantsky: If you're going to try to imply the item simply existing on the shelf is "being available for delivery that day", why does the policy say:

                    "Our lowest prices policy applies to any lower price on an item that is in-stock and available for delivery.. "

                    Because those would be identical, wouldn't they?

                    • +1 vote

                      @CrowReally: They are not identical, available for two specific delivery methods (ways of getting it to you) is different to be in-stock.

                      • -1 vote

                        @assailantsky: Okay, so you're really nailing your colours to the mast here on "available for delivery that day" can be legitimately interpreted as "that day is when the delivery process begins".

                        Let's pull a little harder at that thread.

                        Then "available for same-day delivery" also means that. "That same say as you made the purchase is the day the delivery process begins". The 'same' can't refer to anything else other than the purchase date, because the delivery date is no longer part of the meaning. That's what you've landed on.

                        So let's say you run a shop that sells concrete birdbaths. The only employee is you, but you contract out your deliveries to the local turtle who lives next door. The fastest delivery it's ever made has been a month and five days.

                        Someone comes in to your shop to buy a birdbath and asks about your delivery options. The turtle has a free schedule, so you know she'll be able to start the job today. You have no idea when it will arrive (who can?) but you sweep your arm majestically to indicate your entire stock, and, in your view, truthfully say "Everything has same-day delivery".

                        Because same-day delivery now means same day-dispatch, and there's no implied arrival time. That's what "same-day delivery" means, under that definition. It's just going to start the delivery process, that same day.

                        Just plain wrong.

                        • +2 votes

                          @CrowReally: Maybe I should elaborate on what my above reply to you was meant to say, I meant something can be back-ordered (not in stock), while still be available for delivery and collection, as that’s the two delivery method offered by the online store once it becomes in-stock. Bunnings won’t price match in that case, I presume. Hence, IMO, "in-stock" and "availability for delivery or collection" don’t mean the same thing.

                          "available for delivery that day" can be legitimately interpreted as "that day is when the delivery process begins".

                          I’ve been saying this consistently throughout this thread. I didn’t nail anything new to the mast. Maybe you missed my replies because they were neg’ed to oblivion? ;)

                          Then "available for same-day delivery" also means that…Because same-day delivery now means same day-dispatch, and there's no implied arrival time. That's what "same-day delivery" means, under that definition. It's just going to start the delivery process, that same day.

                          What I said in the OP and consistently said in the thread was that “item is…available for delivery on the same day” =/ (don’t equal) “same-day delivery”, hence I said there was a contradiction in the policy. Many others and yourself disagree with that interpretation. I find it fascinating that you keep going back to same-day delivery. If you go back and read the OP, you’ll find that I’ve never disputed the meaning of same-day delivery (mentioned in the second paragraph on the policy webpage). We have always agreed on the meaning. So, in your example about the turtle, which is interesting, is something I agree with. I believe it is wrong to “…sweep my arm majestically…and truthfully say "Everything has same-day delivery".

                          The fact that Bunnings will match online stores and don't need the item to be delivered on the same day might be because like Saliya said below, the two paragraphs "…therefore seem to be different offers. The poster offer does not seem to try to change the web offer (it does not seem to be a retraction or alteration)."

                          •  

                            @assailantsky: Thanks for explaining your point.

                            I'm not sure of the rigidity of the basis for how different "available for delivery on the same day" is a concept from "available for same-day delivery" - in my head they're the same (I mean, we're just moving words around, maybe adding a hyphen), but like all things that require an understanding of definition, there's going to be different interpretations (and the pitfall of sophistry, I imagine).

                            The contrary interpretation is an arguable point, but I think it would be difficult to convey and get agreement on. I'm reminded of the man in court contesting a ticket for parking in a loading zone and saying "But I was loading myself into the car, Your Honour".

                            Perhaps we can agree that their intention was for the policy to be "same-day delivery" all along, but disagree on how effective the original wording was?

      • +2 votes

        I agree with you here. I think the premise of the guarantee involves current stock. Plus it says pickup OR delivery same day. If You could pick it up the same day, then it qualifies.

  •  

    "However, on Bunnings' webpage Price Policy(bunnings.com.au), the first paragraph states that "Our lowest prices policy applies to any lower price on an item that is in-stock and available for delivery or collection on the same day from a competitor’s online or physical store in Australia". This clearly is contrary to the words in the poster and the second paragraph on the same website, which quotes the "…same-day delivery" again."

    Okay, let's boil that down.

    "Our lowest prices policy applies to any lower price on an item that is in-stock and available for delivery or collection on the same day from a competitor’s online or physical store in Australia" is the policy.

    Now let's add some brackets to make it clear there's more than one option (delivery or collection):

    "Our lowest prices policy applies to any lower price on an item that is in-stock and available for delivery (or collection) on the same day from a competitor’s online or physical store in Australia"

    Add some bold.

    ""Our lowest prices policy applies to any lower price on an item that is in-stock and available for delivery (or collection) on the same day from a competitor’s online or physical store in Australia""

    Now read it out and ignore the (or collection) option, because you're not interested in collection.

    It's ambiguous, but you'll have a hard time convincing them that their policy is purely for "collection on same day" and/or "delivery at any time".

    •  

      I did have trouble convincing them the distinction because the wording is ambiguous. No trouble with price matching at another store. If a T&C can be interpreted in multiple ways, I would suggest it's not very well written at all.

      • +2 votes

        The ambiguity is only if you're an alien reading a list of items and don't have a frame of reference; context makes it clear it's both same day things. Otherwise their terms are

        Our policy will allow for a discount for an item that is either:
        1. available for delivery at any stage in the future (no time scale defined or required) or
        2. available for collection on that day

        While it's possible to have that as your discount policy, it doesn't make sense

      •  

        It isn't ambiguous to me. On reading your OP my thought was, "what's the problem, that's not contradictory, they mean the same thing."

  •  

    Well this is something new. Upon checking the link to bunnings price match policy there are some inconsistency.

    First paragraph says:

    Our lowest prices policy applies to any lower price on an item that is in-stock and available for delivery or collection on the same day from a competitor’s online or physical store in Australia.

    When second paragraph says:

    So, if you find a competitor's lower price (including GST and delivery charges) on the same in-stock item that’s available for same-day delivery or collection, we'll beat it by 10%.

    I hope its just a administrative issue with the wording in policy. Otherwise, it seems they have changed their price match policy significantly to limit it to physical stores as not many business offers same day delivery without membership. And i assume they would not be price matching products available through paid membership.

    • +1 vote

      I can see now that they have the same meaning, and are just worded differently. But for some weird reason, i am reading the first paragraph as:

      • available for delivery
      • or collection on the same day

      Rather than:

      • available for delivery on the same day
      • or collection on the same day

      I guess they have changed the price matching policy.

      • -4 votes

        As I said above, even "available for delivery on the same day" for me means it's available to ship, not received on the same day.

      •  

        It doesn't make any sense for the two things to be "available for collection on the same day" and "delivery at any point in the future".

        If you are collecting something there aren't multiple days between walking into a shop and taking the item. Same day collection is a tautology. So obviously in the sentence the same-day applies to both items, so same-day delivery and same-day collection.

        They could have changed the order of the words (so "collection or delivery on the same day" instead of "delivery or collection on the same day") to help pedantic people who try to claim it says something other than it does, but for everyone else, it is very clear already.

        •  

          I didn't neg you. I agree with you that same-day delivery and same-day collection is not ambiguious as mentioned in my OP. The ambiguity arises from the use of "available for delivery…on the same day" from the first paraphraph on the policy webpage. As the pedentic person, I just want to OzB zealots to have a discussion about their understanding of the price match policy so we don't waste our time trying to match an online store with Bunnings.

          •  

            @assailantsky: Delivery means it is received at your house though. Not sent same day

            • +1 vote

              @Quantumcat: I don't think it is, but that is why we are having this discussion! ;)

              As I said before and neg to oblivion by others, delivery is not delivered, or received. Delivery is a noun, which means the process of delivering. Nothing about a past tense. Same-day delivery means the delivering process is all in the same day, no argument there. But available for delivery on the same day can mean the process can be started on the same day, but not necessary completed.

              •  

                @assailantsky: You could be technically right on that phrase in isolation but if you read the whole sentence that isn't what it means.

                It doesn't make sense to say "collection on the same day", as I said before, therefore the "same day" applies to the delivery as well. If you reverse the phrases "available for delivery" and "collection" then it means the same thing but then it isn't possible to deliberately misread it.

  •  

    Make a formal complaint to Bunnings head office and see what they do.

    • +4 votes

      or.. just maybe, go and order it on amazon.

      Use discounted gift cards, maybe some cashback, and 'stick it to the man' if you dont like their price match policy.

      • +1 vote

        How does this resolve the real issue that Bunnies have two different price match policies?

        •  

          it resolves it by not rewarding the company with your $

    •  

      I'll give them a call on Monday and see what they say.

    • +3 votes

      The head office was helpful, the lady said they will match the price as long as the item is available for purchase on the same day. According to her, the clause there is for making sure it is available for purchase. Delivery don't need to be the same day. Doubt I would get that in writing but it is reasuring to know that we can still price match online stores.

      However, she said that Amazon can be tricky as some sellers on there is not Australian based. For future price matches with online shops, she advises me to email Bunnings support and not bother with staff at the store. But if there's a physical shop front for the item you want to match, it will be easier to verify for in-store staff to price match.

  • +2 votes

    Please let us know your own comprehension of the language used in the policy by voting in the poll.

    my comprehension of this says '1-click order' on amazon.

  • +2 votes

    Why not just buy from Amazon?

  • +2 votes

    Seems pretty simple to me. They both say they need to be delivered or collected on the same day, unless I'm missing something?

  • +4 votes

    The web price beat policy looks like it's designed to eliminate unobtainium / vapourware - "available for delivery or collection on the same day" says "the item must be available from the seller" to me. Which is fair enough: Bunnings should not have to compete / price beat with a seller from which the product is actually unavailable.

    I think "available for collection by a courier" would satisfy this requirement; I don't think "the courier must deliver on the same day" is needed.

    The poster seems to say something different ("same-day delivery" means "delivered on the same day" to me).

    They therefore seem to be different offers. The poster offer does not seem to try to change the web offer (it does not seem to be a retraction or alteration).

    I think you are entitled to accept the offer of your choice. If the product is truly available, I think you can accept the web offer and Bunnings must honour their price beat.

    •  

      If it is available for a courier that you hire to go pick it up that should satisfy "available for collection" as they are not posting it themselves

    •  

      Yes, I agree with your assessment about the unobtainium deals. Your point about the collection by courier makes a lot of sense too, great idea.

  • +1 vote

    I would've just ordered from Amazon right there and then in front of the manager . How much was the item?

  •  

    Surely the spirit of this is to better a price on something that is actually available elsewhere?
    It's so badly expressed that just about any interpretation could be made.

    The Checkout took them to task a while back

    •  

      It's not about the spirit, it's about them trying and protect themselves from misuse (because we all know if there is a loophole in a policy, people will exploit it). So they're trying to make one sentence to rule out many things that probably shouldn't qualify:
      * Pre-orders
      * Grey importers posing as authorised resellers
      * Out of stocks, using cheaper prices to keep customer interested
      * Drop shippers that may not hold the stock, but once an order is placed, place their own order with the supplier (shows as in stock when you purchase it online)
      * Loss leader products that store use to get customers in to purchase other items even though they are sold out
      Plus a lot of other ones

      They make a blanket rule that elimates all of those, and they can push that rule aside on a case by case basis. Which is why the second store can match it, but doesn't have to next time.

      •  

        These examples seem to hinge on the fact that an item is actually in stock, which is what I was getting at.
        The fact that one store honours it, and one doesn't, proves that the current wording is problematic.

        Excluding an item that can't be delivered on the same day is BS and makes the offer vapour.
        If it's not actually in stock on that day - then fair enough, their competitor can't offer what they don't have - and it should be excluded.

  •  

    IMO I read it as only 'some' items in stock are available for delivery on the same day and the next one is for items that 'can' be delivered on the same day.
    All rather ambiguous yes, I think so. All Bunnings has to do is change their wording to be clearer. Lets face it, at the end of the day if a Manager or Staff Member is going to go to all the effort of proving someone wrong to save the 10%, to me they look rather greedy and a company living on the edge and they dont need to. Bunnings is now the largest store of its type now and they dont need to be stingy over a lousy 10%.
    Change the wording is all they need to do. Its only online products that really are the same brands and where the problem lays.

  •  

    What was the item out of curiosity?

  •  

    They can word and promise whatever they want, it is their policy. It is written in plain English twice and you still find issue with it?
    Must be available and delivered/collecting on the same day. Can you drive to the Amazon warehouse and collect? Can you get same day delivery? If yes then they price-match, If no then they don't have to.
    If you need the item right now, buy it from Bunnings, if you can wait for tomorrow buy it from Amazon.

    •  

      OzB in me wanted the extra 10% price beat, not really about the wait or not.

  • +3 votes

    As a summary of things so far:

    Most people interpret the policy wording to mean delivered on the same day. Very few people (myself included) took the dissenting view. A lot of people are ambivalent, by voting for the first option (.). :)

    Bunnings' support (National office) did elaborate over the phone that they will match online stores (must be Australian) as long as the item can be purchased on the same day (in stock and ready to go, and not backordered etc), and it don't need to be delivered on the same day.

    For future price matches with online shops, the advice is to email Bunnings' support ([email protected]) the details of the item (competitor's web link, screenshot, price, bunnings' product link etc), your name and contact number, and Bunnings' store you'll like to purchase from. Do not bother with staff at the store. But if there's a physical shopfront for the seller of the item you want to match, it will be easier to verify for in-store staff to price match.

    •  

      Nice work.
      However, this raises some issues.

      • Why even mention same-day delivery?
      • Will they be amending the wording to reflect this?
      • Do not bother with staff at the store - why not? It's their business and their managers need to be able handle this.
      •  

        My thoughts on these:

        Why even mention same-day delivery?

        After knowing how the policy is used in practice, maybe we have disregarded the importance of "item that’s available for same-day delivery or collection." As long as the item is available for either delivery methods on the same-day, it doesn't matter if it can be collected or delivered the same day? I'm no lawyer but maybe someone could explain this better.

        Will they be amending the wording to reflect this?

        I suspect not, as most people will take the policy as written and misunderstand the wordings and misled by the poster (as demonstrated by the poll). In-store staff will continue to verbally reject some valid claims without any record in writting. While if they reject your email request, they actually have to put it in writing as to why. One positive of this is that it will be easier to dispute any claims with ACCC or States' Fair trading later if you wanted to.

        Do not bother with staff at the store

        One point of contact will make price match outcomes more consistent I guess, she may have been trying to save me further frustration.

  •  

    My local Bunnings is also giving me grief over the same product. They are refusing to price match based on the "same day delivery" clause which I agree differs in paragraph 1 and paragraph 2.

    If only I could go into another store (lockdown woes).

    •  

      You might have better luck with their national office email/phone as per my post above.

  •  

    I think it's time the ACCC got involved really.
    https://www.accc.gov.au/consumers/complaints-problems/make-a...

  •  

    Bunnings is dodgy as with the price match spent over and hour with them one day over a ring camera price matching David Jones in the end they turned it down as their serial had 1 different number on the end even tho their was only 1 ring model at the time