How Long Did Your Dyson Vacuum Last?

Our first dyson v6 animal was bought in April 2018 and this weekend, I found it doesn't charge well anymore. It has been charged all afternoon and only lived for 5 seconds. Then I put it back on charge and it worked fine tonight. It makes me think it's a time to purchase a new vacuum cleaner or get its battery changed.
It also makes me wondering how long does your dyson vacuum last? Is it worth to get a new one or its time to try a xiaomi or dreame?
Our v6 animal was used once or twice a week for a full cleaning.
Thanks in advance.

Comments

  • +11 votes

    do you put it back in the dock after use each time?

    We've had almost every revision of the handstick since the DC35, currently have a V6, V8 and V10. V6 battery is on it's way out, V8 battery has been replaced once and the V10 is still going. Dyson service and warranty has always been top notch so we're happy to keep going back to them.

    •  

      Are you supposed to charge it each time after using?

      •  

        yes I'm pretty sure Dyson recommend that.

        • +3 votes

          The battery on our stick, which is used about weekly, lasted about 7 years. Was happy to pay for the inexpensive new battery and the device is still going strong.

          The Dyson guy (to be honest I was very surprised and impressed by the service) said not to charge it if only using it for quick bursts, only after a big vacuum where it's quite used.

          •  

            @exceladdict: The battery on our stick, which used daily lasted 2 years. A new one from Dyson cost us about $80. I also bought $30 battery from eBay for another Dyson stick but it gets flat in 10 minutes (genuine lasts for 15-20 minutes in Turbo mode).

        • +6 votes

          I was more of the idea that your battery should be sitting around 40-60% for ideal life. 100% charge kills the battery slowly over time, so I think keeping it plugged in is no good.

        • +1 vote

          Yes because 100% full battery degrades much faster than 60%. Battery is wear and tear item not covered by warranty. Dyson knows this very well.

          Your best doing shallow charge/discharge with lithium based secondary storage. Ie keep battery level around 40-80%. It's easy on a mobile phone with a precise battery gauge but for a vaccum cleaner I just leave it plugged in for convinience. My life is much better when I care less.

          • +1 vote

            @skillet: This advice regarding charging is annoying. I have the charging station that comes with it, so every time I finish using it, I put it back into the station. I never touch the power, the power is always on. If this is the case, then it should have been designed differently.

          • +1 vote

            @skillet: Dyson literally supply a charging dock which is the default storage location for the main unit and charges your battery to 100% every time.

      • +3 votes

        The principle is to ALWAYS have them charging.

        It is even mentioned within the manuel

        • +21 votes

          ¿Qué?

          • +3 votes

            @Dancasper: Hombre … caramba.

            ;-)

          • +2 votes

            @Dancasper: There is too much butter on those trays!

        •  

          This is mentioned in the manual so that it's always charged for you to use, but also so you wear your battery out sooner, and have to buy a new one.

          •  

            @Tunblor: Nope.
            The battery doesn't wear off by being trickled charged (plugged on all time).
            It is charge and discharge (use) what degrades the battery. Like phones. Like tools.

            Besides, it has a warranty, not sure for how long, for battery replacement.

            In my case, if and when the battery dies and if the warranty in not applicable then I will open the base and replace the faulty battery/batteries (probably 18650s) by myself.
            I am NOT going to buy another vacuum cleaner just because of battery failure … like with notebooks/laptops … get new batts instead!

            • +1 vote

              @LFO: https://accubattery.zendesk.com/hc/en-us/articles/210224725-...

              The relationship between Depth of discharge (cell voltage) and battery wear is not linear, the majority of the wear on a cell from being charge occurs when the cell is charged above 80% of it's capacity, which is what constantly leaving your vacuum in it's cradle will do.

              I agree that you should replace the battery and not the vacuum; Dyson Battery warranty is only 2 years, a $1000+ vacuum cleaner in my opinion should last longer than that before requiring repairs, and with appropriate cycling of the battery, it can.

            •  

              @LFO:

              @Tunblor: Nope.
              The battery doesn't wear off by being trickled charged (plugged on all time).
              It is charge and discharge (use) what degrades the battery. Like phones. Like tools.

              You're right that charge cycles degrades the battery, but Tunblor is also correct - leaving it plugged in will degrade the battery.

              Keeping a battery for extended periods in a high state of charge accelerates electrolyte oxidation and solid electrolyte interphase growth (which coats the anode) resulting in reduced capacity and increased internal resistance. That means the battery won't last as long and won't be able to put out large amounts of current, so you might still be able to vacuum for a while in normal mode but if you turn on turbo mode, it'll die very quickly.

              There are plenty of references to this online:
              https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_l...
              https://pubs.rsc.org/en/content/articlehtml/2021/cp/d1cp0035...
              https://mospace.umsystem.edu/xmlui/bitstream/handle/10355/73...

              That is why some companies have added the ability to limit your battery's max charge to extend its lifespan. e.g.

              https://support.lenovo.com/au/en/solutions/ht078208-how-can-...

              https://9to5mac.com/2019/10/01/ios-13-iphone-optimized-batte...

              Telstra MU500 5G Wi-Fi Pro modem

              HTC Home Hub

              In my case, if and when the battery dies and if the warranty in not applicable then I will open the base and replace the faulty battery/batteries (probably 18650s) by myself.

              There are 6x Sony VTC4 30A cells in a Dyson V6 pack. At about $9 each, that's $54 for the cells alone. A brand new genuine replacement from Dyson is $79, so the savings from repacking it yourself is only $25. Personally I'd rather just get a new genuine battery with 2 year warranty, but if you're all set up with a spot welder and some spare time on your hands, I suppose that $25 could buy you a good meal for that night. :)

              •  

                @eug: I would go for cheaper Samsung which a lot of name brand cordless Powertools like Milwaukee and Bosch use for the battery packs. These high current cells are suitable for Dyson vaccum.

              •  

                @eug:

                but Tunblor is also correct - leaving it plugged in will degrade the battery

                Yes and no.

                A sophisticated battery and battery charger like those from Dyson products will have the "intelligence" to stop or reduce actual charging when limits are achieved.

                I will agree cheap&nasty, dumb battery chargers will keep charging for eternity but currently many of those ad-hock multi-chargers / multi-chemistry units have the intelligence to charge how is needed and as much as needed and then stop, then to go off..

                Bet you money that a sophisticated Dyson will do that.
                Visually the charging lights stop flashing and go off, indicating some sort of intelligence to stop (charging) when not needed.

                Based on this logic I will confidently leave my Dyson plugged on its charging base when not sucking around … meaning "in use".

                There are 6x Sony VTC4 30A cells in a Dyson V6 pack.

                Usually only one or perhaps two batteries (3000mAh) will be dead and needing replacement and rarely the whole pack.
                But I'll agree with you it is a personal decision based in a multitude of reasons.

                •  

                  @LFO:

                  I will agree cheap&nasty, dumb battery chargers will keep charging for eternity but currently many of those ad-hock multi-chargers / multi-chemistry units have the intelligence to charge how is needed and as much as needed and then stop, then to go off..

                  It sounds like you're referring to dumb chargers vs smart chargers. Dumb chargers continuously charge batteries while smart chargers know when the battery is full and will stop charging. That is possible in NiMH and lead-acid world, but with lithium ion cells, the charger must stop charging when the battery is full - otherwise the cell will rupture or explode. That is why it is absolutely safe to leave a charger plugged in 24/7 - the battery will not get overcharged.

                  But whilst it's safe, it will reduce the lifespan of the battery.

                  Based on this logic I will confidently leave my Dyson plugged on its charging base when not sucking around … meaning "in use".

                  In 2017 I bought a brand new battery for my Dyson DC59. In 2019 I saw a good deal for a Dyson V8 so I bought it even though the DC59 was working absolutely fine. I forgot about the DC59, which I left plugged in to the wall charger for about 1.5 years absolutely untouched and unused. When I decided to give it to a friend a few months ago, I took it off the wall and it was completely dead. The battery would not hold a charge at all. It had experienced zero discharge/recharge cycles for 1.5 years, but the battery died anyway - likely because it was left at a 100% SoC for too long.

                  All this is nothing new. Even Tesla, whose cars use 18650 and now 21700 cells, advise users that charging to 80-90% rather than 100% will increase the lifespan of the battery, with the exception of cars that use their new LFP cells.

                  Of course, I'm not saying one shouldn't leave their vacuum charging all the time. I'm just pointing out that it will reduce the lifespan of the battery. In devices like tools, laptops, cameras, and torches, I see batteries as consumables. Sometimes the convenience of always having 100% charge is worth replacing the battery every 2 years or so. But for less-frequently-used devices, I store them at a lower SoC to increase the lifespan.

                  Truly smart batteries, like the ones on DJI drones, run a self-discharge sequence down to 60% if they are not used for 10 days, to lengthen the lifespan. That is fine for a more technical device like a drone, but if the average non-technical user's home vacuum only runs for 5 minutes instead of 10 minutes on full power just because they didn't use it for 10 days, Dyson is going to get a lot of complaints.

                  •  

                    @eug:

                    forgot about the DC59, which I left plugged in to the wall charger for about 1.5 years absolutely untouched and unused.

                    So the DC59 bought 2017 died after 3.5 years with the first 2 years used … rarely?, intensively?, non-stop?. I feel there are some other variables to justify failure rather than specifically 1.5 years of left plugged in.

                    As a note, my first Dyson lasted only a couple of days … battery (new unit!) was dead holding no charge. Of course a new one was sent to me and the only headache was removing the base from a carefully crafted location and packing everything back. Could not keep even a screw and I was told so.

                    Based on this my experience Dyson batteries may fail without "logic" explanation and within warranty.
                    So, perhaps, your DC59 failed as my first brand new Dyson did, without a logic explanation.

                    I will continue plug in my Dyson all day and every day.
                    I'll report back when it fails … because eventually it will fail.

                    Curious to know how many years of use you'll asses with constant plug in and without constant plug in.

                    •  

                      @LFO:

                      So the DC59 bought 2017 died after 3.5 years with the first 2 years used … rarely?, intensively?, non-stop?.

                      Rarely. Maybe once or twice a month. I'm lazy. :)

                      I feel there are some other variables to justify failure rather than specifically 1.5 years of left plugged in.

                      Well, there is that one explanation that is supported by numerous manufacturers and research papers. ;)

                      It might not have been the cause of my battery failure, but it certainly didn't help.

                      •  

                        @eug:

                        supported by numerous manufacturers and research papers

                        Interesting.
                        Did Dyson also have a similar published research proving plugin-in "always" affects battery life?

                        Perhaps they did after all, and then adjusted the chargers to provide optimum charging for extended battery life. Trivial task really, compared to designing a sophisticated high revs small electric motor … and everything else around this sucker …

                        Dyson producers are quite proud of their brand. A bit of a cult I'm afraid. The "Apple" equivalent of home appliances.

                        I would never ever buy a Dyson hair dryer (>$500??) or those air blowers but their cordless vacuum cleaners are superb. To have a battery operated one that outperforms ( …but for only ~6 minutes… :-[ ) corded ones is a hell of an achievement.

    • +4 votes

      I did always put it back in the dock. Battery died about… 3 years later. Bought a replacement battery for $70 - original Dyson and it's like new again. Easy to replace too.

      •  

        My wife bought an upgraded battery for ours (without looking at the specs closely) so it no longer fits into the dock. Works fine but it's annoying that I have to plug it in by hand each time.

        • +3 votes

          Annoy your wife in revenge

        •  

          Get an upgraded wife

          •  

            @gguu: What if I accidentally get the wrong one and have to plug it in by hand?

        • +1 vote

          Why did you let your wife order electrical stuff?

          •  

            @kfcfatfat: Despite historic thinking, women actually have a mind of their own and can act autonimously. We even let them vote now.

      •  

        Bought aftermarket on eBay $29 and it’s like day 1

    •  

      Agree, their service is great.

      I have a V10 for just over 3 years now, about 6 months ago the main part of the unit had a small part break which meant it was impossible to empty the bin without the whole thing coming off, also the filter was cactus after nearly 3 years of use.

      Went to the service center, while I waited they replaced the main cyclone unit and the filter and it cost me like $50 and took 15 minutes. Honestly quite impressed with the whole thing, would definitely buy Dyson again in the future with that peace of mind that their service is good.

    • +1 vote

      Why on earth do you have so many vacuums?

  • +3 votes

    We had a V6. First battery only lasted a few months and replaced under warranty. Dyson said only charge when needed ie after low then once charge leave off charge

  • +1 vote

    The battery goes pretty quick. You have to show a bit of cheek and ring Dyson and get a new one. However the new one will die as well…

    As others have mentioned the continuous charging doesn't seem to be good for it. Which is a pain as the kids don't plug it in…

    • +1 vote

      Couldn't they do auto shut off for the money ?

      • +1 vote

        They actually do. If you plugged it in, it turn off charging once it is fully charged.

  •  

    My sister has a V6 and it still works after 3 years - used almost 5 days a week, havent replaced the battery, not sure if they will as the vaccum cleaner has already worn out. They always keep it connected to the charger after each use. I use a Dreame V10. It is much better in every way over the V6 they have and the only thing I liked about the Dyson was the softroller brush did not have any wheels and that helped navigating a tad better. But given the price difference, you can buy a dreme and a roborock for the price of a dyson. If they were priced similar, I would pick a dyson anyday.

  • +2 votes

    We switched to Dreame after two Dyson stick vacuums. They went great for maybe a year then constantly cutting out.

    My DC23 has been going strong since 2008 though! Love that thing!

    • +3 votes

      They went great for maybe a year then constantly cutting out.

      Cutting out is a blockage, either filter not being washed or something stuck.

      • +2 votes

        Yup! If the motor does not get enough air to cool it down, it cuts.

        • -3 votes

          You must clean the inlet filter after EVERY vacuum

          •  

            @Amayzingone: Not really required. Once a week is just fine. On my Dreame, I havent done it in 3 months and it works just fine. Somehow the cyclones in the dreame cuts off the dust in the basket itself better than dyson.

            •  

              @John Doh: There is the INLET filter and the OUTLET filter

              If the INLET filter becomes blocked it will restrict the inflow of air and cause the motor to run hot and hence cut out

              But much the same with the outlet filter

              So both must be regularly cleaned

              Im assuming vacuum clean a week so we agree on that point

      •  

        Must be stuck where it can’t be cleared then, I’ve had that thing in pieces!

        •  

          which machine is this that gets stuck? the V6?

        •  

          Washed the filter? That can clog up and not allow enough airflow through causing it to cycle.

    • +1 vote

      DC11 here! Have had since 2004 and still going.

      Given all these battery issues with the newer ones I think I'd prefer a regular plug one.

      •  

        DC17 ~2008. Showing no sign of giving up for me.

    •  

      They went great for maybe a year then constantly cutting out.

      This sounds like you not cleaning the little filter in the middle of the unit regularly. The water-washable one.

  • +8 votes

    About 7 years so far, on the third battery. 3-4 years is good for an original battery. I had a knock off as battery #2 ($25) that only lasted 14 months.

    Batteries are going to be consumable in any cordless appliance you buy.

    •  

      Thanks, where do you buy the battery from? I'm thinking of buying it too.

      •  

        EBay Ggggggggg

      •  

        Or just save the hassle and buy directly from Dyson. They're about $70 but you know that it's going to be as good as the original, and warranty won't be a problem if it doesn't work.

  • +3 votes

    Our first dyson v6 animal was bought in April 2018 and this weekend, I found it doesn't charge well anymore

    Yes batteries wear out on ANY cordless product. Dyson, xiaomi or dreame batteries will all wear out.

    As it is not 3 years old, its out of warranty. Just buy yourself a new battery $79 shipped

    https://www.dyson.com.au/dyson-v6-replacement-battery-967810...

    It also makes me wondering how long does your dyson vacuum last?

    My stick vac battery lasted about 2 years and is used daily. The first battery that died was a free replacement under warranty.

    My folks have one and its on the third battery, generally about 2 years a battery and they use it daily.

    • +1 vote

      2 Years - 700 charge cycles sound reasonable!

      •  

        For sure! Not complaining about having to buy a new battery every 2 years. It gets a lot of use and well aware batteries don't last forever.

    •  

      I would try your hand at the Australian consumer law. There is no exact time, but it states a 'reasonable' amount of time for the warranty. I never really have a problem places like JB, Officeworks, etc once I bring up the consumer law.

      https://www.accc.gov.au/business/treating-customers-fairly/o...

      • +3 votes

        You could and I do love ACL, but in this case a 3 year old battery is 'reasonable' amount of time in my books when a replacement part is only $79 shipped. Not worth the hassle of a big fight for that sort of money to 'fix' it.

  •  

    mmm. I have a V6. Thinking about it , still going strong after guessing 5 years maybe longer. I only charge when need and use for about 5 mins every other day. Does the job and cant complain :)

    •  

      Ours is about 5+ years. Still on original battery. It's not the main vac anymore, so doesn't get used as much. But it's still going strong…

  • +3 votes

    Have you been cleaning the filter? A clogged filter can make the vacuum turn on and off intermittently.

  • +3 votes

    pretty sure you just need a battery replacement, I recommend genuine, don't risk it with aftermarket.

    https://www.dyson.com.au/dyson-v6-replacement-battery-967810...

    • +5 votes

      I bought a knock-off and still running 2 years on without problems. Don’t knock the knock offs until you try it. Just saying…

      •  

        Look at my reply below, it exploded

        Link to news article below

      •  

        I've tried 2 knock offs and they both died after about 6 months. First one was replaced by the seller, second one stopped charging in my V6 few weeks out from the original 12 month warranty that was offered on the original battery.

        I regret not going with the genuine battery the first time around.

        Interestingly though, I gave the battery that wouldn't work in my V6 to my mum who has a DC35 and I haven't heard her complain about it so I guess it must still be going strong.

  •  

    2008 till 2020 and sold it on fb marketplace for a good price too. Got a new one few months ago.

  • +1 vote

    Got a v8 when it came out and it's still going strong.
    I replaced the battery (with original dyson battery) about a year ago. We usually charge it straight after use (but often a use is a full battery worth).

    I'd suggest just buy a new battery. Lots of attractive after market ones but reviews generally suggest nothing beats OEM

  •  

    Put down the trigger while charging, you might able to wake up the battery, the battery is worn, don’t use max mode. If you replaced the battery, avoid use the max mode can made the battery last longer. Try talk to dyson, they might sent you one for free, otherwise, try ask for discount on the battery.

  • +1 vote

    We have v6 slim just over four years old original battery going strong - used daily and always on charge. We never use it on MAX not sure whether that makes a difference

  •  

    I had a similar problem, Dyson Support said it's the battery and sold me (somewhat expensively !) a replacement
    but it didn't fix the problem. I googled around and found comments about the cone-shaped filter
    and that online E-marketplace-that-shall-not-be-mentioned got me a replacement in 48hrs.
    Worked straightaway, even with the original battery. Still using it weekly after 5+ years, go figure !

    • +1 vote

      With the cone shape filter thingy, tap it against something firm a few times, then try again.

    •  

      Dyson Support said it's the battery and sold me (somewhat expensively !) a replacement

      $80 battery? Not overly costly compared to the price of the unit.

      I googled around and found comments about the cone-shaped filter and that online E-marketplace-that-shall-not-be-mentioned got me a replacement in 48hrs.

      Its $15 shipped from dyson and notice how it has those tap/water logos on it? You're meant to wash it out monthly otherwise it blocks up and stops working.

  • +1 vote

    I replaced the battery on my V6 after about 3 years and that improved things but upgrading to a Dreame was much better option in the long run.

  •  

    The very old Dysons lasted a very long time indeed. they were legendary.
    The new hand held ones suffer from battery issues but the motors appear to last well.
    Dyson claims their new more expensive models have better batteries but only time will tell.
    Rechargeable batteries always have a limited life-span

    As with all vacuum cleaners if you maintain them they last longer
    Maintenance involves removing all the filters and cleaning them regularly (virtually after ever vacuum)
    This is very important with the new hand held vacs

  • +1 vote

    Seems like a very bad decision for the hip pocket, environment and suction power to chose a house vacuum that is powered by a battery and not AC mains voltage.

    •  

      Suction power isn't so much of an issue with the Dyson vacuums. However as they produce such decent suction for their size they drain the battery within 20-30 minutes and you're left with half the job done.

  •  

    Running turbo mode all the time will also shorten battery life.

    • +3 votes

      THIS is a really STRANGE comment. There's a REASON the high setting exists.

      • +2 votes

        I don't know why OzHunterNSW is negged. If you call Dyson support about the faulty battery (where the unit is on for few mins and then cut off and refuse to turn on until put it back on cradle for few seconds) they will tell you not to use on high settings. I know it sounds crazy. But that is what Dyson support tell you. Their reason is high setting add too much of strain on battery and it will damage the battery. My interpretation of that is the battery is not fit for the purpose.
        I own V6,V8 and V10. All working great and V8 and V10 had to have battery replaced under warranty. One thing I learned is, never put the vacuum back on the dock when the battery is hot. What I do is, my docks are connected to a Kasa switch which is configured to turn on with sunrise and stay ON.I dock the vacuum and turn Off the Kasa. So, it will turn on next morning and charge which means the battery is cold. Does not bother me as I have 2 other units, I can use in the meantime.

        • +1 vote

          I don't believe a manufacturer would tell a customer to not use their product as designed. More likely there was some unusual context behind that.

          •  

            @bmerigan: Dyson support is crap, they will try blame you for everything and tell you that you are using it incorrectly all to get out of servicing the unit. Play hard ball and they will eventually relent and fix it for you.

      •  

        This comment isn't strange but it's a good way to avoid Dyson from cutting off with older battery.

  •  

    Bought a v6 (in 2014):
    * 10 months old - the wand broke (vaccum had been used a handful of times)
    * 14 months old - the turbine head shorted out
    * 18 mths old - battery died
    * 3 uses with new battery - battery stopped working. It magically started working after I left it on the charger for about 3-4 months without using it (I gave up on the vacuum).
    * 24 months old - the second turbine head shorted out (husband fixed with soldering iron)

    Hesitant to buy a new one after so many problems with the v6. However, there are not many stick vacuums on the market with the same suction.

  •  

    Bought a DC58 at the end of 2014 and it still works on the original battery BUT the motor in the head has gone and this is the second one that has died! Couldn't be bothered chasing up a replacement again so now keep it to use the other attachments and bought a V8 for thr floor. Didn't use MAX, used once a week, kept it on the charger.

  • +1 vote

    Have the v7, use daily. 1st battery lasted 5months and Dyson kicked up a huge stink before they eventually replaced the whole unit (I only asked for the battery) after quoting consumer law. 2nd Battery lasted 4 months.

    Gave up dealing with Dyson and bought a cheap 3rd party battery off ebay, 6months now and going strong. Holds a lot more charge too.

    •  

      Batteries are warrantied for a year, why wasn't it a straightforward claim with Dyson?

      •  

        If they are part of the original purchase then the warranty should be 2 years?

        • +2 votes

          According to the rep I was dealing with batteries are a consumable. Which is BS.

          I think a big part of the problem was that they didn't have any batteries in stock, so they just wanted to get rid of me.

          •  

            @ChickenTalon: Their support seems to be setup to blame the user and make a new sale out of you. We still have the dyson handheld but switched to a Miele electric for bigger jobs, far superior in everyway to the Dyson electric models and cheaper.

    • +1 vote

      Don’t believe you. Contacted Dyson after about 6 months and unit wouldn’t turn on. First thing they did is sent out a replacement battery no questions asked.

      • +1 vote

        You must have been lucky.