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WDTV Live Streaming (Recertified) - USD $77.97 Delivered (Approx $101.33) @ Amazon.com

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This is the Netflix version. New models this year don't (and won't) have the app support for it!

These sell for around $150 locally, so if you're chasing one and want Netflix this is a great option. This is cheaper than Ebay options as well.

Unfortunately no information on the ad regarding 'recertified', though expect the possibility of a scratch or 2.

Have 2 WDTV devices in the house and they work flawlessly!

Price History at C CamelCamelCamel.

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closed Comments

  • -2 votes

    I picked up a few WDTV play from Amazon brand new for less than $50, they regularly go on sale for that price. They have netflix and all the other apps on also.

    edit: looking at the 3C they have been massively overpriced for some time, I would think a discount is coming pretty soon.

  •  

    "Have 2 WDTV devices in the house and they work flawlessly!"

    Unless you want to watch ABC iView, which is currently seriously broken, with no ETA on a fix.
    Unless you want to login to Netflix, et al, and you don't have a USB keyboard handy (say you're away on holidays).

    Better off with an Android tablet and a Chromecast these days, all things considered.

    • +2 votes

      Unless you want to login to Netflix, et al, and you don't have a USB keyboard handy (say you're away on holidays).

      Logged in fine via on-screen keyboard. Not sure how many people would be accessing Netflix on a hotel internet connection…

      All well and good to stream media content, but it's oh-so-much easier just picking up a remote, scrolling to a title and hitting play.

      • -1 vote

        Easier how? I can plug my Chromecast in and be running a video to it from my tablet in under a minute, zero setup. Clicking on a screen in no more difficult than moving around a menu with a mouse. To use a WDTV I have a bunch of cables to plug in, a remote that runs batteries flat and the thing is still broken for iView (plus god knows what else). It usually takes a few minutes to plugin and get going, assuming it's going to play nice on the day.

        BTW, streaming is streaming, both the WDTV and a tablet are streaming.

        • +4 votes

          Not sure why you need to have the unit turned off in the first place, so I'm not sure why startup time is an issue.

          To use a Chromecast, you need to be running the app on your phone and so it drains the phone battery, and makes it harder to do anything else while you're watching the Chromecast.

          Chromecast is only wireless (2.4GHZ also), no ethernet option. With a WD TV player, it can be hard wired to your network, improving reliability.

          As I said, I've got 2 of these, 1 hardwired to the main modem/router right beside the TV, the other in the main bedroom, attached to a 5GHZ router that I needed because of 2.4GHZ coverage in the house. I wouldn't have either of these options if I ran Chromecasts around the house.

          I'm not gonna sit here and say the WD players are the be all and end all and without fault, but I will sit here and say that the Chromecasts aren't for everyone, with their limited functionality and higher learning curve.

        • +1 vote

          @Spackbace:
          I am with you on that remote issue, drove me nuts having to use phone etc…

        •  

          @Spackbace:

          Generally with chromecast you set it running and then turn the phone/tablet off… When you watch Hulu/Netflix/iPlayer etc you dont have the original device running still.

          Try getting Hulu and iPlayer apps on the WD at the same time … Glad you like the WD but I am pretty sure for most people here the time that this was an ok device has passed.

        • +2 votes

          @Pobman:

          As others have said, it entirely depends on usage. I don't even need to buy one to know that it won't handle the a 20GB mkv over wireless 2.4. Happy to be proven wrong, but also happy to hear from others that can confirm that point.

          For streaming 1080p mkvs around the house (and not the highly compressed ones either) and Netflix I'm very happy with the WDs and can show anyone how to use them in the space of 2 seconds, without them needing an app on their phone ;)

        • +1 vote

          @Pobman:

          Yes you can get Hylu, BBC Iplayer, Netflix and the AU apps at the same time! You just need to save them to favourites (ie the favourites thats accessed by the down arrow key), then finally set zone to US and all will still work.

        •  

          @jk200sx:

          If I ever plug it in again I will look at that, thanks.

          So I presume the process is set it to UK and install and favourite UK apps, then set to oz and install and favourite and then set to usa and install and favourite?

          That is one of th annoying things on Roku, no chance to run usa and UK apps at the same time… But generally I much prefer the Roku apps and speed.

        •  

          @jk200sx:

          Tried and it does not do that for me. When region is USA it shows my US favourites, Hulu and Netflix, change region to UK and it shows iPlayer, Netflix …

          Anyway…back in the box, will eBay it.

          Edit: read again and I was looking at the wrong favourite area. Works.

    •  

      Unless you want to login to Netflix, et al, and you don't have a USB keyboard handy (say you're away on holidays).

      Try the Android or Apple Apps. They are pretty nice and you can use your mobile device keyboard :)

      *Not sure if they'd work via hotel WiFi, I think you need the phone and the WDTV to be connected to the same network.

      •  

        Yes, I was advocating using the Android app, if you read what I wrote.

        •  

          If you read what I wrote, I was suggesting use of the Android or Apple WDTV Apps, which nullify your quoted complaint.

          Better off with an Android tablet and a Chromecast these days, all things considered.

          You were suggesting using a Chromecast and a tablet…

    • +6 votes

      Better off with an Android tablet and a Chromecast these days, all things considered.

      No.

      Chromecast is great for streaming sub-20 megabyte FLVs that have been compressed to within an inch of their life via the average soccer mum's el-cheapo router which drop outs every time someone sneezes in the house.

      For every other proper video format, get a HTPC or a capable media player box like the WDTV.

      •  

        Yup

  •  

    Do you need to buy a wifi dongle separately?

    Is it easy to set up?

    I have an old version of this kind of thing, AC RYAN I think. No wifi.

    •  

      In built wifi.

      Setup difficulty depends on your own network setup and knowledge. Relatively simple, all things considered.

      Bear in mind these things are wireless 2.4, not 5.0 (and cant be upgraded unless you use a seperate wireless router etc). So depends how far it is from the router in terms of speeds streaming.

    •  

      replied to wrong comment

  • +3 votes

    Have purchased 2 "recertified" WDTV Live SMP from USA sources (including Amazon) and both have been defective out-of-the-box so returned for a refund. One shutdown after the initial WDTV logo whilst the other shutdown after about 1 hours use. I don't think these devices are being properly tested or refurbished before being resold.

    However, this particular media player is about the only one that will provide 1080p24 for Netflix, has DNS definition capability in the device (for geolocking workaround) and will also play a wide variety of files from USB drives. It's major failing is a very slow GUI that requires patience.

    Apple Australia is out of stock of the Apple TV, which reduces the selection of Netflix compatible devices considerably.

    Roku are somewhat difficult to setup and region switch, so not much of an option.

  • +2 votes

    Found this device so slow and tedious to use compared to Roku for streaming… So much so only turned it on twice ever.. No doubt better for local content than a Roku would ever be, but for streaming it's 3rd rate.

    •  

      May as well offer it to one of the community if that's the case

  • +5 votes

    I would never buy another WDTV unit again. I have the WDTV Live unit, it takes ages to boot up, is really laggy and slow, all the apps are really unstable, rarely ever remembers where you were up to on shared folders, often freezes, sometimes glitches and won't let you login to network shares (factory reset fixes this), oh and did I say I hate it? I'm holding out for a media PC of some kind.
    If you are okay with constant frustrations and unreliable workings, then go for gold. My mate apple tv has been flawless, and I'm quite jealous, although will prob never buy one as it's apple….. I have had 2 replacements by the way.

    •  

      It turns on fast if it was only in standby mode.

      Next time you turn it off, just press the off button briefly or a second or two. That puts it into standby mode and much faster to turn back on. Press off button for several seconds it goes right off and as you say, much longer to turn back on.

      • +1 vote

        Yes this is true, but I often have to restart mine due to it freezing or not working as expected, and it takes almost 1 minute before you can do anything.

    •  

      Sounds identical to my two. Had them both for 18 months or so. Just need to find a stable replacement that has a remote and easily connect to plex media server

    •  

      I have two and they are fairly slow but I've never had any other issues.

    • +1 vote

      Latest firmware caused freeze and lag issues. Firmware rollback fixed it.

  • +3 votes

    I get annoyed how many of my files these won't play - wmv, mp4 or even avi.

    It is a lottery seeing if it will play it or not.

    Also it is super slow.

    I would never buy WDTV again.

    •  

      Yeah..after watching a YouTube review online saying "it plays anything you can throw at it", I was disappointed when the very first file I tried (an anime MKV) didn't play.

      To be fair, it does play 90% of files I have, but I moved on, got myself a NUC, installed OpenElec and Kodi, and that really does play everything I throw at it. If only Kodi supported MKV file segmenting it'd be damn perfect.

      •  

        It doesn't have to be a NUC to compare, even a Raspberry Pi 2 running OpenELEC would be better than the WDTV. Naturally, if you need Hi10P or HEVC you'd at least want a Haswell or Broadwell box.

  • +3 votes

    I bought one of these for $99 from officeworks and it would be the biggest waste of money I've ever spent on tech.

    It is glitchy as hell, slow, overheats and is just a pain to use. As someone else mentioned above ABC Iview hasn't worked at all (which is the main reason i purchased it) and most of the other apps are useless.

    I've tried running 3 different firmwares versions on it and found the 2nd last one to be the stablest, but still ultra frustrating to use

    I use it only occasionally now to review dashcam footage I've recorded.

    My advice would be save your money and buy something that actually works and leave this crap on the shelf.

    • +2 votes

      Reviewing dashcam footage, riveting

  • +3 votes

    These are always one of those things with a myriad of different experiences. I have a WD TV Hub, it is slow as hell, but the best thing for streaming locally stored content. It handles big files (20GB MKVs) with no sweat.
    The unit in this deal did have a known issue with its current firmware that affects many, but not all. I gather with iView still not being fixed, then the firmware is still that same as released in Aug 2014 with the new interface and crashing bug.
    I have had a Roku 3, great for streaming non local content, in my experience and compared to the WD horrid for local. I sent it back.
    I have a Nexus Player which is decent at all things, but great at none, and also has its own issues. They go on sale in Aus next week for $129.
    Apple TV is great with Apples eco system and streaming a lot of non-local content, but piss poor with local stuff with no MKV or DTS support. The 4th gen is due out in a few months.
    Chromecast in my experience of 3 units, just sucks balls, but millions love it, so I am the example, not the norm.

    They all have their issues, my WD TV is still my go to for playing local content.

    •  

      It honestly hurts my brain to think why half these neggers/whiners are bothering to stream anything anyway when they're probably pulling down 5-8Mbp/s maximum on a good night and are connecting to American servers for their content. Yippee, let's watch 240P streams of the Daily Show or Q&A and make ourselves a coffee every time we fast-forward or rewind.

      Then again, neatly organised media libraries shared from a central NAS make way too much sense for Mac Hipsters and the average single mum.

      Surely though, plugging a large-capacity HDD with all of your media in it, into your WDTV, next to the TV and just playing whatever you want, whenever you want, without piss-poor buffering, confusing configuration and all the headaches of poor WiFi is damned straightforward?

      The sales staff and promoters at bricks & mortar tech stores who keep selling people the idea of streaming content as being the way of the future for media consumption in Australia need to be sent downstream the Amazon covered in barbecue sauce. It doesn't work if your telco infrastructure is third-world and all the good content is overseas. Period. People need to get used to the idea that you can't have everything piped in on demand.

      •  

        On Bigpond cable we get over 35mbit/s to the USA so live streaming is no issue at all.

        http://www.speedtest.net/my-result/4304794274

        I know that's not the case for everybody, but for many it is. We stream all our TV, and have done so for about 3 years now.

        •  

          You are in the upper 1st percentile of Australian Internet users.

  •  

    We have three of these and love them. I have only ever had one file that wouldn't play. I don't use the iView so I can't comment on that, but for playing local content off a network they work great. (maybe I'm lucky with the firmware we have)

  •  

    NAS -> PLEX

  • +5 votes

    I can see in this thread there a lot of mums and dads trying to stream ABC iview from the "intanet" - then this device is probably not for you. If you are a serious downloader, like to watch 20GB MKV streaming off your local network then the WDTV is the best device out there, period.

    •  

      I don't see how the WDTV is the best device out there to watch 20GB MKVs off your local network. Surely, there's a plethora of devices at least as good, no?

      • +1 vote

        Not at this price point.

        •  

          No, not a plethora at that price point, but then we'd at least have to qualify the statement "the best device out there, period.", no? I could agree with one of the better devices in that price bracket, but my Pi 2 was even cheaper and has no issues playing back 20GB MKVs off my local network. Not that it would be any more sufficient as a media player than the WDTV, as neither works for me. Nothing at that price point does.

        •  

          @daerka:

          as neither works for me. Nothing at that price point does.

          No idea what you're on about. Your copper line quality and local telephone exchange congestion will determine whether you are to stream or not to stream your content. If the latter is your only option (e.g. a majority of Australians with 3rd-world downstream sync speeds), the WDTV is absolutely perfect for all of your needs, period.

        •  

          @Amar89:

          Amar89 and I rarely agree on anything.

          Not sure if Amar89 actually owns and uses one of these?

          I do. It's pretty crap. It runs very slowly and forgets network shares (or worse cannot connect to them at all) unless you reset it to factory settings at least once a month.

          It can play a lot of files, but it fails to play a lot too.

          If the file has even the slightest error in it, this thing will just stop playing and go back to the previous menu without any error message or indication what went wrong.

          It's cheap, but you get what you pay for.

          I don't stream content from the web - but i do connect it to around 50tb of files on my home network using wireless N. It is slow. It is unreliable. If you connect something to it directly via USB it sometimes has trouble reading the source…

          If you are going to play movies from your personal network once a month I guess it is OK (when it plays the file). If you want to watch stuff on it several times a week, get something better.

        • +1 vote

          @GreatWhiteHunter:

          Amar89 and I rarely agree on anything.

          For once I agree.

          Not sure if Amar89 actually owns and uses one of these?

          Oh only for about 6 years now. 2nd-gen WDTV (non-Live). Also have a newer 1st-gen WDTV Live.

          If the file has even the slightest error in it, this thing will just stop playing and go back to the previous menu without any error message or indication what went wrong.

          Never seen that.

          I don't stream content from the web - but i do connect it to around 50tb of files on my home network using wireless N. It is slow. It is unreliable. If you connect something to it directly via USB it sometimes has trouble reading the sourceā€¦

          " " " and " " "

          Obvious questions are obvious: What's your NAS like? What's your router like?

        • +1 vote

          @GreatWhiteHunter:

          I stream content nightly over 1 of these, and during the day the old WDtv Live gets used in the main room. As I've mentioned, the live streaming is Ethernet attached to a 5ghz router, and with this set up I haven't had a single hiccup. Plays whatever I want from the my cloud attached to the main modem in another room.

          Yet to see a file it didn't like, but it's not like a watch random anime flicks or anything.

          I think the wireless n could be the issue for you. 2.4ghz streaming isn't great, be it chromecast, WDtv, anything like that. The frequency is not good. As soon as I started running on the 5ghz band, no issues.

        •  

          @Amar89: "the WDTV is absolutely perfect for all of your needs, period."

          Umm, no, it isn't, nor is the Pi 2. Neither plays a large number of my files. I didn't mean to start an argument about the WDTVs worth as a media player, I merely added a "[sadly,] neither works for me" to the point I had made. Mind you, my point didn't even have anything to do with streaming from the web, so what does copper line quality have to do with anything? It referred to playing local content off my network, "streaming off your local network then the WDTV is the best device out there, period." Remember? Do you now know what I'm on about?

          The WDTV may well be "absolutely perfect" for all of your needs, but it sure as hell ain't for mine.

        • +1 vote

          @daerka: Why don't you share a bit more about what you're trying to play (codec, file silze, wired or wireless) - I have 3 of these with no issues. Mind you I don't watch DBZ episodes from 1998 using the some old divx codec.

        •  

          @adam149: H.264 Hi10P in a MKV container over a wired gigabit Ethernet connection off my NAS. That kind of info? Though I still have some older pre-DivX files, as well as heaps of OGM files, I'm mainly referring to one of the currently most common encodes for Anime files, which still is H.264 Hi10P until HEVC has matured a bit more. The WDTV simply can't play these at all. At least the Pi 2 running OpenELEC plays these, even though with often unwatchable artifacts. As said, neither works for me. Any other info you'd like?

        •  

          @daerka:
          If its such a strange codec, surely there's others re-encoding it and sharing a different format? Because I'd imagine there's many that have that same issue and want to play back on Xbox, PS3/4 etc.

        •  

          @Spackbace: Not for the majority of content I want to watch, no, and I can't be bothered re-encoding either. Luckily, I've got one of these with OpenELEC on it (well, multiple actually), and it really does play the vast majority of Hi10P content without issues (there always are exceptions), and it even plays a good deal of 1080P HEVC. But yes, it is quite a bit more than either the WDTV or the Pi 2.

    •  

      For playing "backed up" movies wdtv is pretty awesome. For iview, google etc a computer is better than a wdtv. Imo chromecast + computer with plex + router is way crappier than a wdtv + hard drive for playing downloaded (legal) content.

  • +1 vote

    I've had one for ages and it works fine. We've factory reset it to access BBC etc as well as ABC, Netflix and all the rest. Never had an issue and have set many a family member up with one. Considering we're running out of options as the new ones aren't 'streaming', this is a good avenue to get one.

    •  

      New ones are streaming and with Miracast, but they took out the Netflix app unfortunately :(

  • +1 vote

    Well, I've turned. Those that know me and have read my many comments in the past about the WDTVs would know that I love them… sorry, LOVED (past tense)!
    Biggest pieces of slow loading, laggy movement, network dropping, media library losing, crap!!!
    I used to sit here and blame people's set up or network/router for half of these issues. But it would seem that time is just not on their side, the longer I've had them the worse they've become!
    And having young kids, I NEED THEM TO WORK… NOW!!! They've been so close to being thrown out onto the street a few times this year!

    Edit: Actually, I should point out that they're terrific if you've planned ahead, already turned it on and copied your file/s to a USB stick! (which kind of defeats the purpose of having a NAS!)

    •  

      For the kids, the Raspberry Pi 2 running OpenELEC has been near flawless for me (granted, wired to the nas), with the added benefit of controlling everything with the TV remote. Makes things just so simple.

    •  

      Why on earth would it not be working with your NAS? I think that's potentially more of a set up error than a box error. I have mine running through WiFi extender linked to my NAS with no issues. The slight delay is ample time to grab a coffee and munchies - I really don't see why people are complaining about it.

      •  

        Mine is reading from my NAS fine, and it is not a powerful one. Never had it lose a library.
        It is slow to start up, but that is fine as I know it is so turn it on just beforeI sit to watch.