expired Officeworks - Texas Instruments TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator $79

90

Get ready for 2017 school term starts!
Buy it for your kids :)

Texas Instruments TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator comes equipped with MathPrint functionality so you can enter fractions and equations in the same way you'd see them in a textbook or on a classroom board. It comes pre-loaded with applications that allow you to explore interactive geometry, inequality graphing, real world data collection and analysis and more.
The TI-84 Plus Graphing Calculator comes with familiar functionality and an intuitive design so you can get started right away.
It has a large LCD display for plotting out graphs and equations.
The calculator is powered by 4 AAA batteries.
Numbers are calculated to 14 digit accuracy and displayed with 10 digits plus a 2 digit exponent.
You can graph up to 10 rectangular functions, 6 parametric expressions, 6 polar expressions and 3 recursively-defined sequences.
There are 7 different graph styles to choose from to help you instantly recognise which graph you're working on.
MathPrint functionality makes it easier to compare between your textbook or school work and your calculator, by displaying fractions and equations in the same format they appear in print.
You can transfer data between your calculator and computer using the inbuilt USB.
There are apps pre-loaded onto your calculator, including Cabri Jr, Vernier EasyData, StudyCards and more.

closed Comments

  •  

    gg now i can cheat in the hsc

  • +1 vote

    Great for Mafia Wars and Bomberman.

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    You can graph up to 10 rectangular functions, 6 parametric expressions, 6 polar expressions and 3 recursively-defined sequences.

    What happens after I have used up these allocations? In-app purchases to get more graphs? :-)

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      hmm no comments from the chinese phone fan boys about faster processors and more memory and lag in screen updates compared to new models

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      I'll play that one straight. Those are the limits for each calculation. You can also program your own using Basic or, if you're using it at the level where you need more than that many functions, get right down to the metal with the built in Assembler…

      To get a feel, there's a couple of small utilites available here:

      http://www.ticalc.org/pub/83plus/basic/

      You can also get another couple of OS's for it there as well.

  • +2 votes

    Compulsory link.. https://xkcd.com/768/

  • +1 vote

    Remember when people used to program games in TI-84s?

    Pepperidge Farm Remembers.

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      i remember when HP made test instruments and calculators and not PCs ….and TI actually made the calculators. now they just seem to be old brand names used by other manufacturers

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      Had pong on mine, changed the way kids viewed calculators

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    Aren't high schools using and teaching maths using CAS calculators now?

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    tried 5 diff postcode all show out of stock.

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    i still have my school calculators ….. pre mobile phone era and LED displays ….. might get one of these TI calculators and see how far technology has come. just seems cheaper as run out so need to ring store and get them to check the online for other store stocks.

    10 digit display ….. just enough to work out the of buying a new home and total amount for repayments on a 40 year loan based on current house prices.

    thks

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    Between a spreadsheet and dedicated math software and now phone apps I don't have any idea how there is a large enough market for these to still exist. I understand the "approved calculator" scam for school and uni, but who the hell uses a graphing calculator?

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      In my day it would have been a casio watch with a calculator and buttons so small a 12 year old with a toothpick was the only conceivable user. This little baby is a like a fully fledged computer where the graphics card and CPU were ignored, and the maths co-pro put on steroids. Its speed and memory are getting a little low now, but is more a dedicated maths computer rather than a calculator.

      • +1 vote

        So nostalgia? Because I can give you all that functionality on a phone for a few dollars and much more on a PC with free software.

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          The 'computer' option I'd pay - the easiest way would be to download the TI-84+ emulator:-p

          I'd have my doubts about the utility and possibilty on a phone , unless you have managed to port Linux to one and given it a whole pile of extra keys or are prepared to swipe screens. I have had computers as small as this that were pretty pathetic to use as such, and a phone as big as this would be called a tablet. If you were suggesting perhaps a Raspberry Pi with a 7 inch touch screen and supplied scripts for Mathematica them yes, I can put one together in the next two minutes as well, but in comparative terms, the computer option would by a map of and voucher to a supermarket and the Pi option would be a swag of seeds, a list of recipes and a sowing calendar and access to a flour mill.
          This is a pantry and boxes of ready made meals.
          Nostalgia is when you desire something from the past. The casio watch was a gimmick. This is a serious calculator from a serious calculator manufacture with a huge array of open sourced and publicly available scripts covering almost every conceivable purpose you would use a calculator for without needing to contact Cray.

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          @terrys:

          If you have the ROM you can emulate it on your phone directly
          https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.Bisha.TI89...

          If you don't care for that accuracy there are dozens of scientific calculator and graphing apps on the Google Play store. I don't know about IOS.

          On PC Excel, LibreOffice Calc, perhaps even Google Sheets would outdo the calculator. If you need something more advanced Octave, Sage, SciLab, wxMaxima are ones I've played with for free and are good. There are heaps more and Wolfram Alpha.

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          @syousef: Yes - but like I said, the phone at best will have emulated buttons on a smaller screen and a computer or laptop will be larger and less convenient to put in your pocket. Emulating a ROM on a $79 phone is something I'll leave for the next generation [of phones]. Many who grew up with calculators will find it easier to use than a phone, and the TI-84+ I just gave away to a friend whose daughter needs a calculator for school should still be fine for another few months on the 9 month old batteries…
          I can weld up a jig so I can operate my throttle by pedalling like a bicycle but I still leave it how it is and have the bike as well…
          At $150, I wouldn't bother [ mine was $2 from a random box and bought on the off-chance it worked at a Salvos sale] but $79 is a good price for something to be thrown in and out a schooolbag/ Uni backpack and toted to and fro each day.

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          @terrys:

          Phones come in quite a wide variety of sizes. The inconvenience of carrying an additional device - most users for occasional use only - is going to outweigh the issue of the size of the buttons being slightly different and no tactile feel. I can emulate a calculator just fine on my $59 Alcatel Pop 4 5" or my Telstra Buzz 4GX which has a 4.5" screen. These aren't my main phone but they'll do just fine.

          …and I spend a lot of my day in front of a desktop, and take a laptop on holidays. For any serious work I wouldn't dream of using the memory on a calculator or pen and paper to store and organise my work. All very error prone. If I set it up on a laptop and I do happen to make an error, I can correct it in one place and recalculate quickly (or instantly in the case of a spreadsheet).

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    Plus you can use it to make dank tunes

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    Great price. Just went and got one. One left Dubbo, NSW Officeworks.