How to Retire Young and Have a Good Passive Income Stream?

What is something one can do to achieve financial success without putting hours on end to achieve it? (I work 60 to 70 hours a week and merely earn about 87.5k

  • I have an investment property
  • I have a modest car
  • Holiday overseas yearly

I'm 26 and I know I have accomplished quite bit
** But I feel that I am reliant on working like this to support a good life**

How can I achieve FINANCIAL INDEPENDENCE and have a good PASSIVE INCOME without costing my health as I work 7 days a week and I really have to life really…

I hope someone on here can guide me in a direction where I can focus the hours to begin with and step pack and see that I can travel the world and still have a decent income stream like 70 to 100k or more :)

I have thought of buying:

  • Positively geared properties again and again to increase the passive income stream
  • Starting a business (Cafe, bubble tee like Gong Cha franchise, Boost franchise, Anytime franchise)
  • Importing goods from China and going to China to find good suppliers
  • Creating a brand and connecting with instagrammers, facebook influencers to sell fashion products (designed in Aus and source from China)

P.s. Not interested in USANA, Amway or any pyramid schemes

Poll Options

  • 7
    Buy into a Franchise
  • 7
    Connect with Social media and create a branding
  • 108
    Positively geared properties again and again until I achieve success

Comments

  • +37 votes

    Property, ETFs and stocks that pay dividends. Drugs are higher risk.

  • +63 votes

    Avoid franchises like the plague at the moment

    •  

      Thank you for your input :)

    • +21 votes

      I think the words 'at the moment' are redundant

      • +2 votes

        Haha I was just typing that exact same thing until I saw your comment. Franchises are extremely risky and definitely not something I would personally do.

    • +38 votes

      I work in Government and cannot stress this comment enough.

      Franchise's are where you essentially buy yourself a job, work like a dog and lose all your money.

      Dont.. just dont.

      • +16 votes

        This. It truly is buying yourself a job. If you were asked to cough up $200k to work for someone, you would tell them to stick it. Yet this is exactly what many franchise owners do, pay a huge amount of money and then work 7 days a week.

        • +5 votes

          I worked for a publican once who told me this is the way he thought about it. He and two business partners bought the leasehold on a pub, worked it for a few years, and eventually resold it. When he sold the pub I worked at, the deal fell through at first then the dodgy buyer forced through the sale under threat of legal action. My boss said he wanst going to bother to fight it in court. "The deal was good enough when first agreed. I'll just go and buy another job (pub) somewhere else."

          The idea is to sell the business for more than you paid for it in the first place. Franchises however are set up to make the parent company money, not the individual stores.

      • +4 votes

        It really depends on the franchise and it's location.

        Mate of mine owns a subway and manages another, he takes it pretty easy and makes six figures.

      •  

        Thank you nedski!

    • +10 votes

      Avoid franchises like the plague at the moment

      Don't diss the plague… It went viral.

  • +57 votes

    Be born into a wealthy family

    •  

      You crack me up haha ..

      • +76 votes

        Marry into a wealthy family

        • +7 votes

          Rather than "get a good job that pays well", marrying well is the real lesson from Joe Hockey.

        • +5 votes

          marry a crazy rich Asian

        • +1 vote

          @SeVeN11:

          Where can I find myself an Araminta Lee?

        • +1 vote

          @SeVeN11:I heard the going rate for a marriage visa is about 30k

        • +1 vote

          Not that simple. Source: married into a wealthy family.

          Money is a really fraught topic. I am only a worker, but I know it's far better to have what I earned by myself than to accept the "strings attached" to help.

          My brother in law, however, accepted (from his in-laws, who are even richer than his own genetic family) a house fully renovated in a very expensive suburb. He's treated like a doormat by his in-laws now, and has very little to answer them with when they use the house as leverage in every argument.

        •  

          @Jackson: More like 80k, but you can only do it twice and you have to live with them for years.

  • +12 votes

    Invest in yourself and increase your earning potential. Is it possible to do that in the field you currently work?

    At your age, compound interest is also your friend. Play with a compound interest calculator to see how much you'll need to invest at a realistic return rate and for how long to achieve your retirement goal

    • +3 votes

      In my job we have no room for promo, and with regards to compound interest, are you suggesting property investing or shares and super? I don't like super ( retirement age changes, super is just not worth it with fees and crap)

      • +4 votes

        If you're really aspiring to retire early then I agree that super probably isn't a direction to head in. With regard to what's needed to fuel the compound interest train, common wisdom would suggest a diverse portfolio so it's not as simple as property or shares. There's risk in all investments, I'd recommend doing some research and seeing what you'd be comfortable with.

        I have a similar aspiration to be able to retire early, but I'm risk averse so my investments tend to be conservative (eg: index funds, salary sacrifice to cap) so it'll take me longer to achieve that goal. 3 kids doesn't speed things up any either!

        •  

          Hey RandonNinja,

          very good advice to the OP. I just thought I would chime in and say to yourself if you havent already thought of this or if anybody else reading isn't aware that you could be investing in the same shares both inside and outside of super. This obviously depends on your super selection. Again this is fine if you are comfortable owning the shares both within your super account and also in your personal account but just remember if they drop 50% your super will halve at the same time as your personal account will halve. Diversification really is key to reducing risk.

        • +6 votes

          "3 kids doesn't speed things up any either!"

          You need to double down and pop another 3 out, making it 6 and make them to work and support your early retirement

        • +2 votes

          @phunkydude: Oh no you don't, that's how my my wife talked me into the third!

      • +5 votes

        The only way super is not the best place to invest is if you intend dying before retirement age.

        Super provides huge tax savings, so the same investment outside of super won't return nearly as much.

        I would be using super to provide for retirement age onwards first, then when you've provided for that stage of your life start working on that period you want to be retired early.

        As four compounding interest, I like company bonds before there isn't much risk comparatively, and you know what to expect. In retirement they will provide income, in the meantime you reinvest the dividends.

        • +3 votes

          Slick there is definitely logic to your answer and most people would be best to follow this advice but everyone's circumstances are different.

          if an individual had enough capital to create an income immediately through investments are they really better moving that capital into super where they cannot access it for 30 years meaning they have to keep working? (just as an example)

          Also remember that corporate bonds do well as interest rates decrease and worse as interest rates increase. I imagine you have done very well with this investment for the past 20 years but will this be the same for the next 20 years?

          Just for my own interest can you tell me what company bonds or bond funds you like/are invested in at the moment?

        • +1 vote

          @Seba10:

          Like I said, I would only put into super sufficient for true retirement years. If he doesn't have enough to cover that, then he isn't in a position to quit working either way. But he would get closer with super due to the tax advantages.

          Bonds only "do worse" if you sell them. I only buy bonds that I am happy with the return, and have no intention of selling them. Most of the bonds I've bought are indexed, so rising interest means more income.

          Crown recently paid out CWNHA, so I only hold CWNHB atm, so need to find another. My reckoning is the asx averages 8% because all the crashes keep wiping out growth, so if I can get close to 8% without the losses I'm laughing.
          (CWNHB is only paying 4% above BBSW, but my average price is only $90.324.)

          I had MYBG returning 6.7+BBSW, HBSHB 7.5% (fixed).

          Let me know if you find any! I want to get on an IPO alert so I can grab them when they list, but commsec's systems totally suck and I'm sick of telling them their alerts don't work.

        •  

          @SlickMick:

          Thanks Slick

          This is definitely an area I will do some more research in.

        •  

          @Seba10: considering that interest rates are at historic lows, isn't it likely for them to rise eventually, and very unlikely for them to fall?

          Bonds seem quite risky at the moment

          •  

            @Superannuation: Sorry for late reply… I only just noticed.

            I'd definitely recommend considering other views - I tend to be pretty single-minded :)
            But the way I see it, if I'm happy with the return I'm getting, it makes no difference to me if others are getting even more.
            The reason for bond prices to fall is because they can get a better return elsewhere. But my strategy is to be content with what I have, not to chase higher returns. At the moment I prefer bonds indexed to inflation, because there is little room for rates to fall and every chance my returns will rise (but only in line with inflation).

            The bottom line is, is you have bought the bonds for an ongoing income stream, there is never a reason to sell and therefore a falling price is only a buying opportunity. I was accumulating CWNHB while the price was subdued, and the price has risen 15% past my average. That means nothing to me though because I won't be selling them.

        •  

          @Superannuation:

          Hey Superannuation,

          Your statement is exactly what I eluded to in my first response to SlickMick. So yes, I do agree.

          However there are many factors at play. It is a big assumtion that interest rates will go up. Rates in many countries have been around 0 for a decade why will Australia be different?

          Even beyond that you have to consider that if stocks fall people will want somwhere "safe" to put their money which often includes bonds thus increasing demand and price of bonds.

          So the short answer is predicting future movements is bloody tough and not a game I really want to play. Just invest widely in a historically astute portfolio and cross you fingers ;)

      • +3 votes

        Not paying super is not an option for 95% of people

        In that scenario, finding a low-fee with good returns is vital. These funds are there. Research is necessary

        Compound interest can really work here

  • +36 votes

    Work your ball sack off until your 40+ without getting tied down to a ball and chain who will eventually leave and take half.
    The moment your libido starts thinking for you is the start of your dreams coming apart.
    The more you earn the better quality temptations come about to try and destroy you.
    Identify with who loves you for who you are and who just loves your money.

    when your up and running living the dream you will need to reflect back on this.

    • +1 vote

      I want to have a wife and kids too though. I think I'll get married around 29.

      • +24 votes

        Everything will change when you have a wife & kids. If you want to do something, do it now!

        You won't know what time is when they come along.

      • +25 votes

        I think I'll get married around 29.

        Are you in a relationship at the moment? If not, unfortunately it doesn't work like clockwork!

    • +7 votes

      What if the world ends when they are 40. All those years of expending his balls wasted. When the meteor smashes into the plant will OPs last thoughts be "I wish there were more hours in the day so I could have done more overtime and spent even less time with my girlfriends".

      • +5 votes

        And what happens if it doesn't????

        You'll be working until 65 and live like a hermit off your pension while op Will be retired at 50 while having yearly holidays and a new and doing whatever they please

        • +1 vote

          Surely he'll need a few friends to keep him company and help drink some of his beers, and what's a leather lounge suite good for without another butt to sit on it and help watch his 100" hologram TV.

        • +3 votes

          yeah but you could die tomorrow. live within your means and dont live life all about money and work

        • +26 votes

          @boostpak: Completely agree with this one. It is pointless to work that hard in order to enjoy it all when you're 60, which may never come by the way. Plan loosely in case you reach 100, live like you have only today. Simplify your life. I used to spend $1000 on a phone, now I spend $200 (thanks Xiaomi!). I used to drive a $30k car, I downgraded to a $7k car - best decision ever as I never worry about door dents and scratches. I downgraded my mortgage by moving. I use a $800 TV instead of a $3000 one because I'm more interested in watching what's on the TV rather than how deep the contrast is in different light conditions.

        • +5 votes

          @Tuukmaak: well said. Have done the same as you… would like to add bringing lunch to work instead spending $10 day in the food court

        • +2 votes

          @boostpak: Life changes like the wind. Its a beautiful thing when coasting, though. And its not being pessimistic.

          I wish I got married earlier instead of my 30s.. I met my wife when I was 21 and everyone used to tell me "wait till your older". I regret doing that. If you are lucky enough to meet a woman who loves you as much as you love her, marry her. Holidays, jobs, everything is more fun with your real bestie hahah

        •  

          @Tuukmaak: Totally right. Get into sustainable living. Leaf out of my book: grow your own veggies, drive an EV, generate all your own power. Volunteer in groups that interest you. The best friends are there. Plenty of work in all this, but you can do it in your spare time. Enjoying life is not as expensive as you may think. Hope you 'make it' and that doesn't mean to be 'rich'. I hate that word.

    •  

      half! you got off easy

    •  

      Avatar checks out

    • +4 votes

      I was in a very good Financial state then the Wife decided she wanted out. And took my Very good Financial position with her and left me with dept. Please get a pre nup or Setup a trust account in such a way they cant take it. take my advice. from well of to Stuffed for the rest of my life

      • +1 vote

        Were you in a good financial position before getting married?

      •  

        if you are a beneficiary, won't she be able to access 50% of your share anyway??? Correct me if I am wrong…

        • +1 vote

          Some men put all their wealth in their mothers name.. so pretty much they have $0 to their name and because mum will always put them first their money is safe :)

          I would rather take a risk.. if your not 1000% sure you've found out your new soon to be wife inst a gold digger then dont marry her.

          If your worried.. marry someone who's richer then you and toss anyone else to the side.. or find a motherterisa clone

          I dated a girl who divorced her abusive husband. She wanted nothing and she walked away with nothing and he was rich… owned 6 properties.. no loans. i thought she was nuts! :)

  • +34 votes

    I am currently on a similar path to yourself OP

    My recommendations would be of the following:

    Avoid:

    Residential properties return net 2-5% in rent + capital gains. Capital gains are not assured in the short to medium term. This is not ideal for somebody looking to live on their passive income.

    All of your business income ideas may or may not be viable I am unsure but as a part owner in a medium sized business i can assure you it is not 'passive'. There is always a problem that needs solving which depending on you goals may not suit you especially if you want to be mobile and not tied to one spot.

    Consider:

    Building a portfolio of diversified shares.

    EG (my personal portfolio)

    10% VGE - Global emerging markets
    10% DJRE - Global Realestate
    10% QCB - International Commodities
    20% VIF - International Gov Bonds
    40% VGS - Global Share index
    10% cash

    Something along these lines gives me enough free cash to survive a year or more although i still earn approx 2% in high interest accounts. It has wide global exposure so if Australia has a downturn i am not effected. It has broad asset diversification. The goal behind this is that bonds and commodities have historically performed better when there are global economic downturns as more money flows into these 'safer' assets. Note that the above portfolio would really only return 7-10% a year over the long run, it will probably not outperform a simple s&p500 index fund although it should have considerably lower drawdowns and volatility. So considering the returns you're likely to get you'll need to build up a 1m$ portfolio to fully retire and maintain your desired income.

    If you want to get a bit more advanced I highly recommend learning about the market anomaly 'momentum'. Look up momentum investing and for a starting point consider reading Meb Faber 'global asset allocation' (available for free online). There are many academic papers that also examine this in detail. Momentum can be used as a stand alone trading strategy or in conjunction with a portfolio like my own. Historically using momentum on a portfolio like the above would have returned closer 12% reducing the required investment to get to your desired income level.

    I genuinely hope this helps in some way and gives you a starting point or a different perspective on what to look at.

    *Disclaimer - past returns are not indicative of future returns. this is not financial advice, it does not take into account specifics of your situation or risk tolerance #dontsueplease

    •  

      Not wrong. To put it down simply "find a good fund manager!" try searching on Investsmart and trying to find out their 10 year returns. 5 years is too short as it doesn't incorporate how well they did during the GFC.

    • +2 votes

      Thanks for the in depth comment you have written. I literally have no ideas how shares and work and the tax involved. I really want to earn a good amount of passive income and reduce my time working for a small amount of money considering my hours.

      Thanks, p.s. I know the legality and I will do my own research :)

    •  

      Great advice. I am just starting on same joirney and got some ETF already and now thinking of adding in some LIC like MLT or ARG in the mix. I noticed you are invested in ETF but not LIC. Have you looked into LIC and realized they are not worth it or haven't looked into them?

  • +32 votes

    Invest heavily in crypto and magic beans

  • -1 vote

    Consider:

    Building a portfolio of diversified shares.

    EG (my personal portfolio)

    10% VGE - Global emerging markets
    10% DJRE - Global Realestate
    10% QCB - International Commodities
    20% VIF - International Gov Bonds
    40% VGS - Global Share index
    10% cash

    Why don't you just say give all your money to AMP,MLC and let them deal with it.

    What countries do you invest in and what political influences swayed you to invest there.
    how long did take to learn each emerging countries forcast for you to feel confident into investing if your suggesting you do this on your own.

    • +7 votes

      Hey Hawkeye,

      I think your questions were directed at me so i'll do my best to answer them!

      Neither AMP or MLC offer a single investment option that encompasses the above listed portfolio although if they did with a reasonablel management fee i would certainly consider it. It should also be noted that my education is in the investment universe and I enjoy tinkering with such investments. I completely agree a more simple solution may be more optimal for many people.

      My investments cover most countries in the world on some level. you can see the individual investments of each of the 6 assets listed above by googling the ticker symbol and doing a bit of digging. By diversifying to this extent i am not betting on any individual country or government, i cannot predict the next black swan event that will take down a country or company but i do not need to. I am effectively betting on humans continuing to prosper widely and the improvement of living standards throughout the world.

      •  

        Do you use a managed fund or DIY?

        • +2 votes

          DIY mate,

          the 5 tickers i mentioned are all asx listed and can be purchased on any share trading platform through your banking institution. Its an easy strategy to run through self managed super as well.

        • +1 vote

          @Seba10:

          Hello,
          Looking at getting into shares / index funds in the near future.

          How does the taxation process work?

        • +2 votes

          @movieman:

          Short answer talk to a qualified accountant with experience in the investment world.

          Slightly longer answer - generally speaking no tax until you sell and realize a capital gain (shares worth more than when you bought them). If holding period over 1 year you only pay tax on half the capital gain. eg buy shares for $100, sell 1 years and 1 day later for $200 your capital gain is $100 but you pay tax at your personal tax rate at on just $50 (so about 30% for your average Joe).

          If trading shares within Australia with shorter holding times than 1 year the tax really does cut into your profits thus your compounding.

          Good luck with everything

        •  

          @Seba10:

          Thanks.

          Was looking into the index fund (or Vanguard) and just wanted some real-life reassurance regarding the gains.

          If the gains are only realised on sale, then I could potentially invest $100,000 in index funds, grow it for 10-20 years, and sell it off slowly (ie in simple terms, if it will be worth $200,000 in the future, sell only $20,000 per year, and realise the gain only on that component.)

          Would that work?

        • +1 vote

          @movieman:

          correct movieman,

          that should work but it depends on rules and regulations at the time you are selling.

  • +85 votes

    You never know what the future may bring.

    Why bust a gut now?
    You can't take your money with you.

    My investments are in my time (hobbies) and in my family.

    I work 20 hours per week and my wife does voluntary work.

    I have watched and helped my kids become young adults. This was my investment.

    I'm not wealthy but I am rich in so many better ways.

    My retirement will be comfortable but not luxurious and I don't care.

    I could be dead tomorrow.

    • +4 votes

      exactly.. working 70hrs a week and 7 days a week is just sad. Especially if you actually don't HAVE to do it, you CHOOSE to do it. So much life is wasted. We only have one life on this beautiful earth. Why not use the prescious time we have to do things we love and spend it with loved ones. My advice is stop thinking so much about money and retiring early and go travel the world and splurge on things you enjoy and love and have always wanted to do.

      • -1 vote

        @booktpak

        I CHOOSE to do it as I want to build a NEST and a PASSIVE INCOME STREAM so I can travel the WORLD and be CAREFREE in the future. I don't want to REPLY on a PENSION IN OLD AGE and be in a RENTAL HOME!

        • +10 votes

          It's just shame you might retire in your 50s and think back wondering how much more you might have enjoyed your 20s and 30s - when you were physically capable of doing so much more.

          If you're always looking to the future you never get a chance to enjoy the present.

        • +4 votes

          So you'd rather lose time from 25-50 so many amazing moments in life to be carefree when you have a crook hip and walk around hobbled so you can travel the world then and not be on the pension. You need to wake up a little and realise there is way more to life than money mate. It's all about balance in life. No one is telling you to go buy a gold Ferrari, but at the same time you don't need to run yourself into the ground and have zero life in your 20s the best years of life you can never get back in order to who knows potentially have a carefree future which may not even happen regardless of whether you work 40 hrs a week or 80hrs a week. Having no life wont make you successful and satisfied in life. Having gratitude, meaning in life, time with family, true friends, real life experiences and happiness will though. Financially working all those hrs really wont change much. Youre not going to be rich doing all of that. You seem so money focused you've lost sight of what really matters.

    • +4 votes

      Fair words but I've always hated the you could be dead tomorrow logic. It could be used as a fallacious argument for so many poor decisions. I'm sure you can think of a couple.

      • +4 votes

        You can hate it all you want but it's a fact that you're not guaranteed a future. People are not saying you should be an irresponsible ahole, but to hold on to things lightly, stress less, be nicer to others… Sure plan to live to a 100, but don't put all your eggs in that basket.

    • -1 vote

      Thanks for your advice! I completely understand your hobby :)
      I came from a very poor family and financially secure future is very important to me! I want to travel the world and still have a PASSIVE INCOME STREAM to support me along the way!

    • +4 votes

      Some people are so rich that only thing they don't have in life is money..
      and some people are so poor that only thing they have in life is money!!!

  • +7 votes

    Read 4 hour work week

  • +1 vote

    GongCha franchise, it's heroin in a cup!

    • +6 votes

      Apparently it is plasticides in a cup, but if that's your thing.

      • +1 vote

        Seems a bit risky to sell plasticides in a plastic cup, won't they kill the cup and spill on the customer?!

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