Silicon Power NVMe PCIe Gen3x4 M.2 2280 R/W up to 3,200/3000MB/s SSD (256GB $79.99/512GB $109.99/1TB $199.99) Delivered @ Amazon

610

Super-fast PCIe Gen3x4 interface for read/write speeds of up to 3,200MB/s / 3,000MB/s
NVMe 1.3 support
RAID engine for enhanced data integrity
Slim form factor M.2 2280 (80mm) for perfect fit in slim and portable mobile applications or desktop PCs
To support a Silicon Power PCIe SSD, the system must have an M.2 connector with only an M key. The Silicon Power PCIe SSD does not have a B notch and therefore, the B key on the SSD connector will prevent it from being inserted.

Computer Alliance has the 256GB ADATA XPG SX8200 PRO for $86.33 Delivered use code PLACE (6 Left) Seems like a good price as well.

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Comments

  •  

    is this any good?

    •  

      Seems to be better than the intel 660p and slightly worse than the Samsung 970, here's a review https://www.anandtech.com/show/13955/the-silicon-power-p34a8...

    • +9 votes

      These SSDs use Phison PS5012-E12 controller. NAND chips are Toshiba 3D TLC NAND. It has SLC cache and DRAM. These are NVMe class SSDs so SATA3 SSDs simply are no match. Reviews tend to look at 1TB version of the SSDs. At queue depth 1, it manages to beat 970 EVO Plus in random write (only just though). However, as soon as the queue depth increases, Samsung 970 EVO Plus regained the lead (by a bigger margin). As most tests look at higher queue depth, you would see Samsung NVMe come out ahead.

      Silicon Power is discounting these at the moment. Given they are essentially NVMe SSDs priced at SATA3 m.2 price range, they are tempting. Value for money, these look attractive.

      •  

        That actually sounds really good, would it be more durable too? About to take the plunge as it's much cheaper the the SN750 or Evo plus!

        •  

          Reliability is where I am a bit cynical about this. This is the newer A80, the older A80 was PCIe x2. No warranty period information on the listing, but if we based it on the old A80, then it is 3 years.

          I don't trust endurance figures. Based on my past experience, most SSDs tend to die prior to exceeding total writes for general public (we don't run cloud based servers or heavy servers with lots of VMs at home). Also, I see m.2 being a less reliable form factor (smaller area - harder heat dissipation; so thermal throttling does take place).

          The warranty process is also a question mark. Do we need to send it overseas? On the other hand, the preference is always have the SSD lasts long enough, rather than using the warranty process.

          •  

            @netsurfer: Can't we just use the Corsair Force Series MP510 as a reference point(https://www.anandtech.com/show/13438/the-corsair-force-mp510...) considering it's the same controller and NAND? Write endurance is rated at 1700TB for 960GB model and 800TB for the 480GB model.

            •  

              @Satirical: The review Kazusa pointed out earlier already gone through both SSDs:
              https://www.anandtech.com/show/13955/the-silicon-power-p34a8...

              Basically, the two SSDs have slightly different firmware version but same controller essentially. Probably essentially the same parts, but different brands.

              Write endurance is basically how much spare NAND flash the manufacturer decided to include. It can vary. The Anandtech page did list that this A80 has a 5 years warranty.

              However, my key point is the durance rating isn't a good measurement of reliability unless you really do a lot of heavy writes. Every single one of my SSDs died never even got 10% of total write endurance figure, with my Samsung 840 failed with less than 2% of total writes (and I never filled that SSD over 35% ever - so surely it wasn't writing to the same block repeatedly). To me, it gives people a false impression on how long an SSD will last.

              Also, do most people look at retired block count on their SSDs? I have one SSD in used which just gone over 10% of the total write endurance rating and 7 blocks are now retired. The SSD software I used says the drive is at 96%, yet the vendor official software says 100% (so I cannot RMA this drive). Personally, I prefer quality flash cells over a large quantity of spare cells.

              The reason the endurance ratings look impressive on these is because they use 64 layer based TLC cells. The question is how likely is only 1 layer in a 3D stacked block of 64 gone back (instead of multiple or everyone). I'd rather divide that figure by 64 and take the worst case that the entire 64 layers in one block could gone bad at the same time (being pessimistic). Or, a crude way to look at it is that high density multi 3D layer cells allow some interesting / smart marketing when quoting endurance figures.

  • +1 vote

    So tempted..

  •  

    Could you put these in a housing and use them as external memory?

    •  

      Yes you can and I have been looking into this for a few weeks now. To get the most benefit and speed out of them, you need usb 3.1 gen 2 which can be pricey. If anyone has bought one of the cheap ones off Amazon or ebay that say they are usb 3.1 gen 2, I would love a review

      • +1 vote

        Make sure you get the enclosure that supports M.2 M key if you buy one if these.

      •  

        I can review cheap SATA 3 USB enclosures: they're garbage.

        Hopefully NVMe is better …

        •  

          I've experienced the opposite. Did a whole suite of tests, but was never happy with the tidiness to post. Was 2 years ago, and first time I'd thought of doing a public one.

          That said, I'm referring to the ~200MB/s range.

    •  

      Of course

  •  

    For storage, I only trust big brand.

    Samsung 970 evo plus/ 970 pro

    Wd black sn750 series

    •  

      5 year warranty says they trust them to last

      •  

        No tbw quoted tho and that's a huge part of the lasting its either 5yrs or tbw whichever first.

        •  

          Honestly, from my past experience, most SSD failures resulted in a complete death. So, I doubt the big brand's RMA department would be bothered to repair it and then check the total write.

          While my experience with Samsung SSDs is mixed so far, I cannot fault their RMA department. True, I did have to pay for the postage to send it to them, but they did provide a brand new and better SSD as a replacement.

          I do hope WD is better with their RMA for SSDs. For HDD, they were bad. They gave me a refurbished HDD which was noisy and did not last too long (pretty much failed soon after the remaining warranty period ended).

    • +11 votes

      Trust no one when it comes to storage. Always back up your files.

      Big brands break too.

      •  

        Trust no one when it comes to storage. Always back up your files.

        Totally agreed. I have 4 SSDs failed so far. 3 of them are Samsung NAND flash chip based SSDs (1 of them is Samsung brand, the other two are other brands but using Samsung NAND chips). 4th one - an old OCZ. To be fair, I have more Samsung SSDs than other brands.

        Wasn't good for early adaptors of SSD tech so far - Samsung 840 (Samsung's first TLC NAND based SSD) and 840 EVO are both disappointing to say the least. 950 Pro - first gen NVMe SSD - heat / thermal throttling and overall reliability. Samsung's warranty / RMA service for SSDs is great though. I know my 840 EVO is a time bomb waiting to fail, it's just a matter of when.

        •  

          Have 2x 120GB 840 evo's both from 2014, have been used heavily and constantly for the last 4-5 years and still holding up great. Read and write performance is still there too so guess I consider myself lucky. *Not denying big brands don't fail, just my experience with 840 evo's has been great so far.

          •  

            @Deathtrapz: 840 EVO still has that infamous slow read on old data issue (which Samsung ended up with just a workaround at the end). If you use it constantly, then the slow read would be less of an issue or non-issue.

            840 (non-EVO) was bad though, in which Samsung did not even bother offering a firmware upgrade for the same issue. I also wondered why 840 was so quickly replaced by 840 EVO (less than 6 months from memory). I was somewhat glad my 840 died and Samsung RMA gave me a 850 EVO instead.

    • +1 vote

      Silicon Power is a small brand? only in your dictionay

  • +1 vote

    Thanks. That $199 price for the performance tipped me over the edge. Had been wanting a larger drive for my laptop

  • +1 vote

    1TB now oos

  •  

    Would this fit a latitude 3160?

    •  

      Nope, you need standard a SATA3 SSD. It has a Pentium Dual Core CPU right? It's not worthwhile spending too much on a Pentium Dual Core system. Just get the cheapest SATA3 SSD you can get.

  •  

    Thanks was looking to supplement storage in m2 slot any suggestions other than this? Thanks

  •  

    1TB not available anymore 😭

  • +2 votes

    back in stock

  • +2 votes

    And 12% shopback makes it even better.

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