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[VIC, NSW] 6.6kw Solar System + Redback Smart Hybrid Inverter + 4.8kwh Battery Starting $52 Net Monthly Outgoings @ Eko Energy

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Solar & Storage Deal from Eko Energy, Redback & EnergyAustralia's PowerResponse Offer

The above example quote is based on a single storey, tin roof, no splits, in Melbourne Metro, with a compliant switchboard that doesn't need any additional work i.e switchboard upgrade or single pole enclosure/main switch to be added, on a single phase dwelling. Using on average 20kWh/day at an electricity retailer rate of $0.25c/kWh and a daily supply charge of $1.10/day. Using approx. 40% of your power during daylight hours. With a feed in tariff of $0.10c/kWh. Based on a expected electricity price rise of 8% pa.

Assumes maximum $2,225 eligibility for Solar Vic Rebate. Applications re-open on 1st of July 2019 - For more details and to register for updates - https://www.solar.vic.gov.au/Solar-rebates

For more information on the $1,000 EnergyAustralia Redback PowerResponse offer - https://cdn2.hubspot.net/hubfs/3425759/EnergyAustralia_RedBa...

For a tailored quote to your usage profile, needs and roof profile feel free to email kez.hassan@ekoenergy.co or feel free to book in an initial 15-45min telephone consult with me by clicking here - http://info.ekoenergy.co/meetings/kez-hassan1

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closed Comments

  •  

    Redback still exist?

  • +4 votes

    After privatising the electricity system against the wishes of the country - creating an economic disaster according to the ACCC - the Australian Government set about shifting the cost and financial risk of building the power plant itself onto the consumer.

    People kept saying yes I hate my money so I would love to do that by voting Laberals.

    •  

      whereas before privatisation the cost and financial risk of building the power plant itself was borne by the taxpayer, we should also remember that the money raised from selling the Victorian power stations was used to pay some of the $33billion dollars of public sector debt and $16billion budget sector the liberals inherited from labor and that in the last 25 years with Labor having been in power for the majority of this time they have at no time attempted to buy back or build another coal fired power station and have actually help see some of the ones that were sold closed down

  • +5 votes

    I’ve got nothing against the system, but two things - if you need to finance it then don’t get a battery. Really just don’t. It is of marginal value even if you can afford to pay for it up front and even then most people shouldn’t get one, but if you need to finance it the answer should be a clear no.

    Do get solar either way and if you need to finance that then go ahead and do so, it will be well worth it, but a battery is a different story.

    Assuming 8% annual electricity price rises over 20 years and using that to calculate a return is ridiculous. The panels themselves should last that long and the inverter might if you are lucky (but you really should be budgeting for a replacement well before 20 years), but the battery certainly shouldn’t be expected to last that long. 10 years at 70% capacity might be realistic and perhaps a 15 year overall lifespan, but 20 is very optimistic.

    More importantly, 8% rise continuously over that long is very unlikely. 3-4% might be a reasonable assumption, but certainly not 8%.

    •  

      Agreed except I would say the battery is not even of marginal value. That battery will never pay for itself. Given a good quality 6.6kw system is around the $6000 mark with Federal government rebate, Victorians get a $2225 additional government rebate and the price of the system is %12711, that battery has an implied cost of around $9000. The battery is only 4.8 kw/h, it might save you about $1.40 every night. Obviously a much worse and pointless a deal if you have to finance it.

    • +2 votes

      At 8% I'd invest in electricity companies. Nobody is getting that kind of increases.

    •  

      Fair point, most of our customers opt for the cash purchase price rather than the finance for the reasons you have highlighted. We break this down as 10% deposit, then 40% when we confirm an install date, and the remaining 50% paid after installation.

      In terms of the 8% annual electricity price rises over 20yrs, there is alot of conjecture on what is the correct annual electricity price to use. Some reports suggest as you say 3-4% others as much as 10-15% we have decided to work on a % around the middle of these.

  • -2 votes

    I don’t think anyone who can afford a $12k solar system is eligible for the solar rebate. Household income has to be below $180k, that’s basically a full time professional and a part timer. If both of you work, you’re basically not eligible.

  • +1 vote

    Based on a expected electricity price rise of 8% pa.

    Where does the 8% come from? Has it historically been 8%? Despite all the media attention around high energy prices my own energy bills have stayed steady for the last 10 years. Every time the unit rate goes up the discount rate goes up to compensate.

    •  

      When i moved into my current house (3.5 years ago), my rate was 29.5c/kwhr. Its now over 40. Recently its been way more than 8% (at least for south australia)

      • +1 vote

        Wow, mine is 16.9c/kWh in Victoria. You guys in SA need to pay for those cool batteries delivered in 100 days by the new celebrity ceo musk I suppose.

        •  

          After discount about 36c inc GST is reasonable in SA. If you are paying much more than that then you are probably paying too much.

      • +1 vote

        Yes it has, but those sort of rises are not going to continue in the long term. We have gone from an oversupply of cheap coal-based electricity to expensive wholesale prices now because of somewhat restricted supply after closure of somebody coal plants and some gaming of the system by generators and we’ve had an overbuilding of transmission based on expected rises in consumption that didn’t eventuate that both contributed to recent increases. There may be some increases in the future, but it isn’t going to continue like is has in the past for the long term.

        •  

          This man is knowledgeable!

          Do you work in the industry or something?

          • +1 vote

            @cloudy: No, just read a lot in the hope that renewable energy can save the planet despite the efforts of some and luckily it seems that it eventually will win out as being the lowest cost way of generations electricity.

            So if you haven’t already then do get solar. These days It is almost as simple as it will save you money and will help the planet as well. This is the case pretty much regardless of how much electricity you use and when and regardless of where you are inthe country. Some places are better than others, but unless you have an extremely shaded roof, everywhere is at least good. Some offer are also better than other and often the cheapest won’t be the best long term, but again pretty much all will save you money.

            Batteries on the other hand, unless you really know what you are doing they probably arent a good move yet. They may get there soon, but haven’t yet in the vast majority of cases, unless you have extreme problems with blackouts and are prepared to pay for the privilege of having power at those times.

            Individual circumstances vary, but if you want a simple explanation then that’s the case for the vast majority of Australians.

            •  

              @mps41: I’m already getting solar, and I read as much as you I reckon.

              The only consideration I’ve thought about but never see any coverage is the environmental impact of the manufacturing and end of life cycle waste of the panels/inverters.

    •  

      In terms of the 8% annual electricity price rise, there is alot of conjecture on what is the correct annual electricity price to use. Some reports suggest 3-4% others as much as 10-15% we have decided to work on a % around the middle of these.

      • +2 votes

        Possibly in the short term or over some select years but anyone suggesting 10% or more for 20 years is nuts.

        Consider that over the past 20 years we’ve had some big rises, but over the whole 20 years it is still only about 4% a year on average.

        At the end on the day it shouldn’t matter too much though. Nobody should base any decision on a 20 year prediction - it either stacks up now or it doesn’t. You can always buy later with probably lower costs if it doesn’t stack up now and prices that justify come along in the future.

        I’m sorry if someone of this sounds harsh or hostile towards you, but this is a bargain forum and this is a big purchase and people should understand what they are getting. I know that the main reason I come here is to hear the experience and advice of others. Your offer seems reasonable if someone is in that market. It might even be a bargain if you are in that particular market (I don’t follow prices closely enough to know). However, it certainly isn’t a bargain for the average household and that is my main point. The key is that people have enough knowledge to judge what the right solution is for them.

  •  

    Vic rebate period has ended . Those who didn’t get an eligibility number shouldn’t install until after July when they reopen rebate registration

    •  

      Correct, we would only install after the 1st of July and once you have received a Vic Gov eligibility number.

  •  

    Price for installation on "Tin Roof" and "CBD" talking about loophole as big as the Melbourne Metro Tunnel!

    •  

      This is a typical standard install price, for other roof types and the further we get from the CBD, the price goes up marginally to cover the extra costs we incur.

      •  

        How many tin roofs are there in the CBD (post code 3000) and how many buildings in the CBD would be a standard installation?

        How many new homes built in Victoria would have a tin roof?

        Sorry reading T&C's like that is a red flag!

        •  

          @netjock please forgive me it should read as "Melbourne Metro" not "Melbourne CBD" I have amended accordingly, thanks for pointing this out. May I ask which T&C's are a red flag for you? As we always seek to improve so your response would be most welcome.

  • +1 vote

    Ditch the battery. Make sure you don't have shading issues. Buy the most panels you can fit aesthetically on your home and biggest quality non-hybrid invertor you can afford. Read up on the whirlpool green tech forums, great info source. I have just installed 50 Trina 310w and Fronius 15kw inverter (3 phase) for $11.5k Sydney. I'm estimating a 4 year payback not including the rising costs of power. Each additional panel you can afford is about $150 and a better investment than a battery

  •  

    I ditch the battery very few people the numbers add up and wait to the gov announces what it is doing with interest free loans from July
    https://www.solar.vic.gov.au/Solar-rebates/Interest-free-loa...
    Looks like they are also changing the rebate so the installer takes the $2250 off straight up so you do not wait 4-6 months for it.

    •  

      @davemc @F111 - we do offer solar only solutions at www.ekoenergy.co Generally, we are finding those that are going for batteries at this stage fall into 2 categories. "Early Adopters" They want the latest in tech and/or want to have an impact on the environment. 2nd group is those whose bills are higher than the average household and their main usage is at night and again want to reduce this electricity bill significantly and/or the up front investment for them is a lesser consideration weighing up the long term outcome.

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