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Corsair RM750x (2018) 80 PLUS Gold Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $148 Delivered @ Amazon AU

950

This is my first post on here so please be chilled with me.

I just spotted it on Amazon Au. Cheapest is $165 + shipping. Don't forget to use Cashback for 5% more

Fully modular + 10 years warranty + very quiet 15-20 dB(A) under normal load. Can read full review here https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/corsair-rm750x-v2-psu,5...

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closed Comments

  • +1 vote

    Is this a good price and good power supply? Starting getting parts for my PC

    • +1 vote

      Yes and yes

    •  

      Would depend on the other parts you're getting for your PC- but corsair is a reputable brand and I would recommend getting a good rated efficiency or higher.
      Use one of the online power calculators to determine what wattage power supple you require first.

    •  

      Yes and yes. I have one for my build 3 years ago for $175, it's extremely solid. It's also backed by 10 years warranty which is industry standard for higher end PSU (3-5 for normal/budget tiers).

    •  

      This is good. With PSUs you will want to check the reputation of the brand, Corsair is reputable for reliable PSU. You will want to make sure the wattage satisfies the power requirements of your build, for example 750W might be pushing it if you want two GPUs and a sick liquid cooling setup. You will want to make sure that you are happy with the efficiency rating, gold is mid level, you can get platinum and titanium rated ones that obviously cost a lot more. And lastly make sure that the advertised metrics are not bogus by looking up the report on the 80plus.org website for that PSU.

    • +3 votes

      Power supply efficiency is a curve so ideally you'd want to aim for having the average system wattage to be at the peak of the curve. If the system doesn't draw enough power then you'd be wasting some energy and having paid extra for the PSU at the same time - a double whammy. One of the few situations when bigger isn't necessarily better. The CPU/GPU these days consumes a lot less power than the ones from more than 5 years ago so definitely look up the benchmarks of your target spec and size the PSU accordingly (rule of thumb is that peak efficiency is about 1/2 of the rated capacity).

      Personally I've got a 750W platinum (got it on the cheap) running a budget gaming build that hardly draws 220W at the max while gaming. So the efficiency is close to just 80-85% - a bit of a waste for my PSU.

    •  

      good PSU and a good price. But that doesn't mean it is necessarily the best or cheapest for you as it depends on specs of what you are building.

    •  

      This isn't a bad price but it is possible to get as good PSU's for cheaper. Also think about how much power your PC is going to be using. 500W may potentially be enough and can save you a bit of money.

  •  

    solid price for a quality psu

  • +2 votes

    Bought my RM550x(2018) for $139 from PCCG two weeks ago. I knew this will happen after I bought something :(

    • +5 votes

      If 550w is enough for your use, you really haven't missed out on anything.

      • +3 votes

        In fact, you want a PSU rated around 10-20% watts higher than your computer components require, this gives you the most energy efficient outcome. A 1500 watt PSU will use more electricity than a 750 watt power supply for most people for no benefit.

        • +6 votes

          It's actually untrue I believe. The usage of electricity is depending on the actual power draw from the other components. Having a bigger wattage PSU only means that the maximum power output can be higher if needed, doesn't mean your PC starts using more power.

          • +5 votes

            @clse945111: That's true, but eggs is referring to the efficiency of the PSUs when under the same load - as an example 80 Plus Gold guidelines state the PSU should be 90% efficient at 50% of their maximum rated load.

            So a 750W PSU would hit that efficiency with a 325W component load, drawing 325/0.90 = 361W power from the wall

            Put that 325W load on a 1500W 80 Plus Gold PSU = 25% loading. Guidelines state 87% efficiency at 20% load, so the 1500W PSU would draw about 325/0.87 = 374W of power from the wall.

            (This is probably an extreme example, but I hope you get the idea!)

          •  

            @clse945111: there is an efficiency curve and you want to run your setup on the sweet spot, and drawing 400w from a 1500w supply isn’t the sweet spot.

            • +2 votes

              @garage sale: you are both right but clse945111 is probably more accurate to real-world usage for many modern PSUs, which can hit maximum efficiency from as little as 20% load. The PSU in this deal is actually most efficient between 200-400W , so for most single-GPU systems this would be ideal, but in either case the effect of wattage/rating on power draw is small compared to the other components in the system.

              Higher wattage PSUs also tend to have better build quality (but not always) and will often be much quieter due to slower fan ramp up and/or fanless light load modes.

              I get that it's good to remind newbies that you don't need to overspec a PSU but I feel in recent years it's gone too far the other way, due to people repeating each other over and over on reddit etc when they don't really understand. Annoys me a bit when people advise lower wattage PSUs are somehow better than higher wattage ones.

              source: https://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/corsair-rm750x-v2-psu,5...

  •  

    dammit i just picked up the EVGA G1+ 750w a couple of weeks ago.

  •  

    I have never understood paying for a fully modular PSU

    You have to use the 24 and 8 pin for your motherboard and CPU anyway

  •  

    Love the RM series PSU's from Corsair. I have a bunch of the 1000W, they haven't missed a beat.

  •  

    Oh man I got this for 158.5 shipped a few weeks back :(. Amazeballs PSU

  •  

    Hey

    I’m building a mini itx in a nzxt 200 and I’m wondering whether it can accomodate a Atx power supply

    https://pcpartpicker.com/products/power-supply/?compatible_w...

    Reckon this would be good, I’m going I9 and 2080ti

    •  

      The NZXT H200i can accomodate both ATX & SFX PSU units, this PSU would also be good for your i9 & 2080ti.

  • -1 vote

    CX750M is available for $135 from PC Case Gear. Mind you that's before shipping cost, so i guess this is a good deal. If the difference in price were significant, i'm guessing it'll take you many years (decades even) to recoup the extra $$ for Gold, if ever. As others have mentioned, efficiency is a curve so you need to be drawing power at peak of thew efficiency curve ideally. Depends how you use your PC and if you put it into sleep mode when not in use, as well. You can't go wrong with this PSU though.

  • -3 votes

    There was a large batch of dodgy ones of these hence v2 version.

    Amazon may well be dumping them here who knows… I ain't going near them

    still being harassed for stating facts…..

  • +7 votes

    My Corsair HX650 died a few months before the 7 year warranty was up. HX650 was discontinued and Corsair offered to replace with RM650x or refund. I asked for another Seasonic-made unit but nothing was available at the price range so I went for the refund. They refuned me the cost of PSU and return postage for RMA (AU$60 to Taiwan).

    I will definitely buy Corsair again after this kind of warranty service.

  • +1 vote

    Looks like the $148 seller is not listed anymore

  •  

    I have the RM650i (essentially the same thing). Just great. Very good quality

  • +1 vote

    i have this PSU

    solid AF.

    sli'ed 780ti's
    then 980ti's

    no sweat, no issue