expired Rislone Injector Cleaner 177ml $5.99 (Was $14.99) @ Supercheap Auto

690

Good reviews, not the lowest as last time, i think lowest was $5, but still worth it

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  • +4 votes

    Do these things work? Or are you better off use high octane fuel which has better detergents?

    • -5 votes

      just pump e10

    • +6 votes

      They're all BS.
      Removing the injectors and getting them sonic cleaned is the only real way to clean them.

    •  

      In my case it did work.
      I bought a car that was run on LPG for too long without the previous owner using petrol, the injectors were not spraying well and the car was running ruff. I had put several 98 octane tanks through the car without improvement until I put injector cleaner in and the car ran like a dream after 2 treatments.

  • +1 vote

    What? I paid $120 for the dealer to clean it!

    • +9 votes

      I'd seriously doubt if the dealer would have bothered to do any disassembly for this kind of price. He must have used a product like this.

    •  

      Once I paid $160 for this and he did mention they will do no car cleaning, I didn't know what does that mean. After that I am doing on car cleaning myself :-)

    • +7 votes

      $120? Wow mate, the ming mole at my local dealership with the low cut top gave it to me for free when I purchased their bargain $2999 paint protection package.

    •  

      I think that's Nissan or Toyota as well. The dealers can opt to buy an expensive machine sent from the head office to pressure clean injectors. To make up for that, they have to charge $130 and push customers to use the injector service. It's a big upsell and you won't really notice a difference.

    • +1 vote

      The dealer pumps high-pressure cleaner fluid directly into your fuel rail. This costs around $150-$200.

      This is a far more effective clean than tipping some cleaning fluid into a tank which gets massively diluted down.

      However the best option is to have them physically removed and professionally cleaned in an ultrasonic bath, reverse flow pressure cleaning and new filters. They also do before and after flow-rate and spray pattern testing with this option and will continue cleaning them until they perform as new. I just had this done in Perth for $176 (only 1 place that does it this way) including new rubber seals, but I did the removal and re-install myself. Much cheaper than new injectors plus seals which would cost over double.

  • +1 vote

    Needs ‘PEA’ in it to be effective.

  • +1 vote

    $17.49 currently at Repco

    • +1 vote

      Gotta love THAT public company, looking after its PE. One day the customers will matter- perhaps the day after they go into administration

  • +1 vote

    This one works pretty well

  • +3 votes

    Thanks. Bought 2 bottles based off the reviews

  • +4 votes

    Product seems good tried in 2 different cars, I was sceptical at first, but it seems to make a slight improvement.

    • +4 votes

      Same here. I'm super skeptical about these things and decided to try it for $5 just for fun. It actually helped my 3UZ with 150k on it to run slightly better and consumption improved by ~1-2l/100km. I'm still skeptical though:)

      • +6 votes

        Remember to do scientific tests, things like humidity, daily temperatures, oil viscosity, range covered, let alone traffic conditions, fuel variances between pumps- all those (and more) have considerable effect

  • +1 vote

    My mechanic recommended me this after a recent service with 98 premium fuel, restored fuel economy and added a lot of power. Best to add it before you refill from close to empty.

  • +5 votes

    I drink this stuff for breakfast

  • -2 votes

    snake oil

  •  

    does this just go into the fuel tank before a fill-up?

  •  

    Anyone tried Flash Lube Injector Cleaner ? Even cheaper and also has good reviews….

  •  

    Is it worth using in a car that just has 55,000kms on the clock?

    •  

      No, noticeable for car that over 150k

    •  

      When you do service, they will put a bottle of this kind of cleaner into fuel tank.

      •  

        Which is the wrong time to do it- a lot of it ends up in the oil and reduces the oil's lubricative effects.

        I add a bottle to about half a tank, right before each major service- and drive a long distance, and right after do the oil change. It gets babied for the last 1/4 of a tank, ideally in cool conditions, as that is where the oil has become most contaminated and is no longer protecting as well.

        •  

          How does something that goes into the fuel system get into the oil?

          •  

            @edrift: Maybe the manufacturer forgot to install the piston rings?

            In all seriousness, you can end up with more fuel in your oil if you do lots of short distance driving without the engine completely warming up.

            9.9 times out of 10 the amount of fuel that ends up in your crankcase oil is so negligible that it isn't worth worrying about. By extension the 180ml of this stuff that you add to 60l of fuel is going to have even less of an effect.

            •  

              @Nomadesque: Which is why cars driven short distances need engine rebuilds around the same time as those driven a long way.

              Probably over-cautious yes, I just don't like avoidable risks very much. Fuel thins oil very well, making it far less capable of protecting surfaces under load and heat.

              500-1000ml of cleaner in 30L of fuel (I use two bottles if an old car which hasn't done it before), of which a good amount will make it into the oil and past the rings I see as dangerous as the oil is already old and poor. Some engines have small sumps which make the effects worse. Detergents cause all kinds of chemical craziness which result in bearing material wearing much faster, esp. when under heat and load. Maybe not fast enough for you to notice an immediate failure, but certainly some wear can be avoided by using it only before a service- esp using high concentrations

              •  

                @resisting the urge: Have you looked at the SDS for this product?

                99% of it is petroleum distillates (basically the same thing that you pay $1.50 per litre for at the pump). Every other ingredient is present at concentrations of 0.1%. If you add one litre of the stuff, you're getting around 10ml comprised of 6 other ingredients that aren't basically petrol diluted in 30l of fuel (so it makes up 0.03% of what goes through your fuel system). You rarely hear people saying that their cars perform "so much differently" using fuel like E10 which is 10% of something other than a petroleum distillate.

                If your car's oil is getting diluted by fuel to the extent that it is visually thinner and/or it smells strongly of gasoline when you drop it, adding this to your fuel is the least of your worries.

                •  

                  @Nomadesque: 'You rarely hear people saying that their cars perform "so much differently" using fuel like E10 which is 10% of something other than a petroleum distillate'

                  Indeed, but they are not driving anywhere near WOT, race conditions and many do notice the reduced economy

                  IMHO, when big oil companies sell fuel laced with additives (I'm not talking E10 here), be they for hygroscopic adjustment, detergents for keeping fuel distribution and delivery systems clean, they do so knowing exactly how average combustion is affected and use lots of chemical controls to prevent nasties getting in the oil or cause a huge amount of unwanted bi-products (at least the noticeable ones, lol)

                  'If your car's oil is getting diluted by fuel to the extent that it is visually thinner and/or it smells strongly of gasoline when you drop it, adding this to your fuel is the least of your worries'

                  I'll sure second that!

  •  

    Is it worth adding for 80,000kms? It's cheap, as long as it does no harm.

    •  

      As long as you don't mind paying $33.84/l for something that is 99% the same product as the fuel you buy at the petrol station.

  •  

    tried it last time when it was on sale, I got a 40L tank so just half bottle into the empty tank before a full fill up, make the exhaust smells funny, probably reduced my MX5's fuel consumption by around 1L/100Km. anyway 6bucks wouldn't hurt anything

  •  

    Guys, its worth mentioning that if this even does anything at all, it has the potential to do more harm than good, as it may dislodge material in your fuel filter or fuel lines only to have it then obstruct the fuel injector filter or spray holes.

    If you want to clean our your entire fuel system, start from the rear and work your way forward: new fuel filter, then loads of fuel injector cleaner to clear out fuel lines, then finally physically remove injectors and have them professionally cleaned (mechanics can't do this, you need to go to specialist fuel injector professionals). Make sure you get new rubber seals when you re-install the injectors along with silicone grease unless you want to give your engine a petrol shower).

    •  

      If your fuel filter is letting through particles that clog your injectors then there's something wrong with your fuel filter. Putting an injector cleaner through your system isn't going to make larger micrometre crud pass through your fuel filter when it wouldn't before.

      If you insist on using injector cleaner then it would probably be best to replace your filter after letting it run through the tank of fuel that you added it to. Anything upstream of your fuel filter that gets dislodged will get caught in the old filter and then you can replace it with a new filter. Unless you have a habit of leaving fuel in filthy jerry cans before putting in your 2019 sports car, Australian fuel is not going to fill it with crud very quickly (if at all).

      Any kind of fuel or oil additive is a substandard replacement for actually removing the affected part and cleaning it properly / replacing seals. I've fixed an idle issue on a carburetted system precisely once using a fuel additive (Liqui-Moly), but every other time I've sorted issues out by removing the float bowl, physically cleaning the jet and then liberally applying carb cleaner. Works every time.

      I imagine injectors are probably the same and not really worth messing with unless you know that you're having issues with them. I drive a '94 injected Nissan and have never cleaned the jets. Still runs like a top. I expect that there is a fair degree of some sort of bias at play when someone "feels like their car runs better" after putting a fuel or oil additive in it.

  •  

    My local store actually offered free Club Plus membership on any purchases as well, so winning more here!

  • +1 vote

    I'm torn weather to do this or not, mixed feedback from everyone!

    •  

      Well I don't think you'll damage anything. Worse case scenario is you overpaid for 177ml of petrol-ish substance.

      I bought 8, yet to try.

      The following is not evidence based whatsover:

      Been mostly using the Nulon equivalent (& total fuel sys cleaner) on and off for past 3 years in my MY02 WRX STI. Mechanic reckons helpful for an old car and one tank isn't enough so I run about 3 tank fills in a row say once/twice yr.

      200k major service I planned for fuel pump and fuel filter replacement because rust in fuel tank. So the 4 months leading up to that service, ran Nulon in every tank.

      Engine felt much easier to rev after that, but I'd put it down to replacement of fuel filter (was pretty dirty) but hopefully the nulon did it's job of clearing out the tank rust and anything on the injectors.

      Mechanic reckons the injectors looked pretty clean though!

      •  

        Worst case you block your fuel injectors with stuff freed up further back down the fuel system.

      • +1 vote

        Mechanic reckons the injectors looked pretty clean though!

        Sweet! Would be interested to know how they came to that conclusion. Just a visual inspection or did they run them through a sonic cleaning and then perform an analysis of the spray pattern (comparing before and after)?

        All questions worth asking if you're paying money for a "service" that extends beyond being told what you want to hear.

        http://www.injectorpulse.com/service-procedure/

        •  

          Pretty sure just visual inspection.. But like I said… I have no evidence but this mechanic has done our family cars for nearly twenty years.. He should be done with the BS by now haha.

          •  

            @hatepostage: Sure, all I'm saying is that a visual inspection might identify issues like a perished o-ring or cracked injector body, but no-one can just look at the holes where the fuel is jetted out from and go "yep, all looks good" without actually measuring the spray pattern / volume in an objective way.

            I'm sure your mechanic is fine. They just know that injectors rarely go bad and the probability is in their favour when they tell you that they all "look good". If the car isn't exhibiting systems of a faulty injector then there's zero need to mess with them.

            Honestly I'd be surprised if they even remove them when doing the inspection as sometimes disturbing them so can necessitate replacing the o-rings if they're a bit old and won't re-seal properly when reinstalled.

  •  

    One look at the marketing guff on the manufacturer's website makes me want to avoid this stuff at all costs.

    Don’t you wish there was a drink you could have once a week that would clean your system and give you the power and energy to get through your busy life? Your car wishes this too. That’s why we created the Rislone Fuel Injector Cleaner — the best all-around fuel additive to use with every tank of fuel.

    Better stock up and follow the recommendations if you believe the hype!

  •  

    If you fill up with 98 fuel then you don't need this!!!

  •  

    Got two bottles to try in two cars.

    Should it be used a full tank of petrol or can you use it in half tank? Should I fill immediately after to help rinse it through and mix properly in the fuel tank?

    • -2 votes

      Just add it to the tank, turn the key between ACC and off 16 times, flash your high beams twice, do three laps of the car while reciting some satanic incantations and I guarantee you'll feel the difference.

    •  

      As long as you use the right quantity for your tank then it doesn't matter if you use it for half or a full tank (i.e. if it says use a full bottle for a cool tank then use half a bottle for half a tank).

      You could just tip it in any time (not necessarily before a fill) because when you drive around the fuel is going to swirl around in the tank anyway

    •  

      Full tank and put it in prior to refueling.

    • +1 vote

      I did before fueling the car at the service station fill the tank.

      Also I use this when I go for long drives as advised by the mechanic.

  • +2 votes

    I had a bit of stutter in my car, after consulting the ozbargain fave mechanic, Pegax, I decided to put some of this in, not this brand. And it completely stopped the stutter for a few weeks, I've used it again and its been a few months stutter free.

  •  

    Does anyone know of these work/any benefit for 4 stroke lawn mowers or 2stroke whipper snippers??

    •  

      They use carburetors, just use carby cleaner (straight down the throat/barrel) that should work better. If it's bad enough to be upstream of the throat, the carburetor has seal or pollution problems and will need a strip down, and the tank/filter will be full of organic pollution (grass and soil). If so, a bottle of this will have no effect, but may well also make things worse.

      PS. A bottle of this is however ideal to clean the carby and fuel system parts in when you strip it down.

  •  

    Why do I have a associated tag on my username? I'm, in now way shape or form associated with Supercheap. (profanity) supercheap!!!

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