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12Mbps Unlimited NBN $39.90 (Was $49.90) for First 1,000 Customers at FlipConnect

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Save $10 per month when you pay an extra month in advance. Get12mbps unlimited NBN for $39.90 for the first 1,000 customers.

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  • +9 votes

    12 MB/s surely must be typo. 12 Mbps I was getting in 1997.

    • -4 votes

      This is 12 MB/s NBN though…

      • +5 votes

        12MB and 12Mb are a vastly different thing

      • +5 votes

        THIS IS NOT a 12MB/s NBN plan! This plan is 12Mb/s (megabits) which is equal to 1.5MB/s (megabytes)

        • -7 votes

          THIS IS NOT a 12MB/s NBN plan!

          Why not?

          • -1 vote

            @jv:

            Why not?

            FTFY

          •  

            @jv: Megabyte is represented with a big "B" in "MB" while Megabit is represented with a small "b" in "Mb".

            1MB = 8Mb, so it can be very misleading for you to say this plan is a 12MB plan as that is 8 times faster than what the speeds actually are.

            •  

              @Mooty:

              1MB = 8Mb

              Aren't there 1024 Kilobytes in a Megabyte and 1024 bytes in a Kilobyte ??

              •  

                @jv: Yes, that's correct, but doesn't really have to do anything with you saying this is a 12MegaByte plan as this is plan is actually 12Megabit

                Just know that there are 8 bits in a byte.

                Kilobyte, megabyte, gigabyte etc are all represented with a big "B" in KB, MB, GB etc.

                Kilobit, megabit, gigabit etc are all represented with a small "b" in Kb, Mb, Gb etc.

                Here's some info better explaining it than I am: https://techterms.com/definition/bit

      • +4 votes

        This is not a 12 MegaByte per second connection. It is a 12 Megabit per second connection. Small b.

    • +1 vote

      When I saw 12Mbps then NBN, I couldn't believe my eyes.

    •  

      Pricing reverts to $44.95 after first 1000 customers.

    •  

      Wow, you must be loaded.

      I didn't get internet until 2005, and the value plan then was 1500Kbps for $50 a month with something like 30gb of data.

    • +1 vote

      Seems my comment came out kind of weird. What I meant to say was:

      This is 12 MB/s right? 12 Mbps must be a typo - I was getting that speed back in 1997.

    • +1 vote

      You're dreaming if you were getting 12Mbps in 1997.

      •  

        Probably more like 10 Mbps, but close enough.

        •  

          what were you using?

          • +1 vote

            @lostn: Telstra Bigpond cable. Same as what I'm using now.

            •  

              @AussieZed: that would have been ultra expensive in 1997. Us mortals were on 33.6k dialup at the time, with 56k on the horizon.

              • -1 vote

                @lostn: It was $60 a month. That was considered very expensive at the time (typical dial-up ISP at the time was about $30-$40 a month). Funny how today $60 a month would be considered a bargain.

                •  

                  @AussieZed: That is incredible because when I first got Telstra cable (called Bigpond) it was in 2000 and they charged $65 a month for 512Kbps. When GST began it went up to $72.50. And then they reduced the download cap to 3GB a month. And charged something like 25c per MB that you went over the cap. And they then uncapped your speed, which was about 10Mbps (less than what you were getting in 1997). You could rack up a bill of thousands of dollars in just a few hours based on 25c per MB.

                  Did you have a download cap or unlimited in 1997?

                  Optus Cable was more generous than 3GB (until later when they copied the 3GB) but their maximum speed was about 300KB/s or 2.4Mbps.

                  ADSL was beginning to start up, and 1500Kbps was the top speed.

                  So what you had was not only incredible for its time (and even 10 years later), but it was super cheap and well ahead of its time.

                  • -2 votes

                    @lostn: Sorry, I stand corrected - it was $65 a month. It included 100MB and each extra MB was 35c. Anyway, if you had cable yourself in 2000, why did you originally doubt my claim of getting that speed in 1997?

                    • +1 vote

                      @AussieZed: Because this deal is for Unlimited downloads and you had 100MB. But you implied that you had an equivalent product as this in 1997 for not much more than dialup prices. That's misleading. What you had was aimed at businesses not the consumer.

                      100MB can be used up in seconds at this speed. If you actually tried to use your internet for more than checking emails, your plan would have been super expensive, not $65.

                      Consumer cable from Telstra didn't begin till 1999/2000.

                      • -1 vote

                        @lostn: Wrong. It was intended as a consumer product from the very beginning. A business would have used more than a consumer, making it even less suitable. In those days, ISDN was aimed at businesses. And I never claimed it was an equivalent product. I just said that I was getting the same speeds. Also, 100MB could not be used up in seconds back in 1997. Everything on the internet was designed for dial-up speeds, so file sizes were very small. That said, 100MB could be used up very quickly, in a matter of days if you weren't careful. Thankfully, there were numerous unmetered websites available, both from Telstra and otherwise. Internal FTP sites, for example, were unmetered, so we used to download hundreds of MB worth of movies, music, programs, etc. These sites were set up by other cable customers.

                        •  

                          @AussieZed:

                          Wrong. It was intended as a consumer product from the very beginning. A business would have used more than a consumer, making it even less suitable.

                          A business can afford it. Ask a home user to pay 35c per MB for 'broadband' intended to be fast and therefore use a lot of MB. Fat chance of that.

                          And I never claimed it was an equivalent product. I just said that I was getting the same speeds.

                          You're technically right, but it's a natural assumption when you compare things.

                          Also, 100MB could not be used up in seconds back in 1997. Everything on the internet was designed for dial-up speeds, so file sizes were very small.

                          I easily used more than double that a month on dial up. I started with an unlimited dialup ISP then they reduced the cap to 200MB. I would reach that in 2 weeks and have no internet for the rest of the month unless I paid some similar crazy 25c per MB.

                          File sizes were smaller, but not small enough that you could live on 100MB for the month. A game demo would be around 35MB or more, and that's about the size of a movie trailer of the time (compression was nowhere near as good as it is now). Getting that trailer downloaded in seconds would then tempt you to download another trailer. Three of them and you're done for the month.

                          That said, 100MB could be used up very quickly, in a matter of days if you weren't careful. Thankfully, there were numerous unmetered websites available, both from Telstra and otherwise. Internal FTP sites, for example, were unmetered, so we used to download hundreds of MB worth of movies, music, programs, etc. These sites were set up by other cable customers.

                          If I had a 100MB cap, I would be living in fear of going over, constantly needing to check the meter and rationing my use very carefully to avoid a huge bill. Worrying about exceeding your limits isn't broadband. This was actually what happened to me when Bigpond introduced a 3GB cap which was only 4 years later. And 3GB is 30x more than 100MB. And I lived under that tyranny for years because Optus cable was not available in my area and still isn't.

                          •  

                            @lostn: Well in the first few years, what I actually had was a secondary dial up ISP for when I didn't need the speed but wanted to download a large file. Kind of ironic. School kept me very occupied so I didn't have endless time to burn through data.

                            • +1 vote

                              @AussieZed: That would have been expensive having two ISPs. Unless it was one of those where you paid hourly. There were dialup plans that charged $5 an hour. Crazy. There were also dialup internet booths at shopping centers where it was $12 an hour but you paid in 5-15 minute increments. Basically checking your email.

                              If you were in school, your parents most likely paid for all this. Mine weren't so generous. They did pay for my internet but $65 a month was out of the question.

                              Anyway, if you had cable yourself in 2000, why did you originally doubt my claim of getting that speed in 1997?

                              3 years is a long time in tech advancement. The 1990s was dialup dominated and it didn't begin in earnest until around 95. So to have an equivalent 10 or 12 Mbps cable in 1997 sounded very incredible to me. It would have been available but not wide spread or not advertised to the average home user. Internet adoption rates were still not all that high back then. 100MB cap does make sense. There's no way I can see a reasonable download cap for Cable in 1997 for $65.

                              •  

                                @lostn: ISDN was aimed at businesses because it didn't have a download cap and didn't tie up a phone line - so best of both worlds. Cable was not ideal for businesses, because most buildings at that time were not wired (internally) for cable, and also cable couldn't be connected to certain premises (not sure about commercial buildings, but typically some apartment blocks/townhouses for example). The business could also easily go over the monthly usage limit - all it would take is one careless employee, and thousands of dollars could be racked up. Not worth the risk for a business owner, imo. ISDN was very expensive, though - hundreds per month.

    •  

      Yes, it is a typo. Speed is actually 10mbps. ("Typical Evening Speeds 10mbps")

  •  

    is $50(normal price) good for a 12mbps only plan?

  • +8 votes

    Hi all,

    As per my previous comments when they advertised this deal:

    Real maximum download is 12 Mbps = 1.5 MB/s :
    https://www.gbmb.org/mbps-to-mbs

    Upload is 1 Mbps = 125 KB/s

    Awfully slow speeds, half that of ADSL2+

    NBN12 is being phased out, and the minimum will be NBN25 (which was ADSL2+ speed)

    I advise you not to lock yourself to this slow speed contract.

    You can read other negative experiences here:
    https://www.ozbargain.com.au/node/482011

    • +8 votes

      NBN25 (which was ADSL2+ speed)

      How many people got 25MB/s on ADSL2?

      •  

        @jv

        NBN25 is 25Mbps = 3.125 MB/s

        That's theoretical max speed. The real speed would be 85% to 95% of 3.125 MB/s

        I'm on NBN100 on Aussie Broadband. Theoretical max is 12.5 MB/s, I average 10.5 MB/s to 11.4 MB/s

        When is was on iinet ASDL2+, I was 1km from the exchange (straight line and 1.6km line cabling). I got an average of 1.5 MB/s

      •  

        I'm currently getting 0.8MB/s MAX 🥳

    • +8 votes

      This post is misleading. Max downlink ADSL2 was 24mbps. The vast majority of ADSL2 services were way less than the max. To therefore suggest this is half is simply not true.

    • -1 vote

      No lock in contract… Worth a punt

    •  

      Dunno about that.. Before NBN I was lucky to get 4mbps at any of my propertys always on the ass end of the exchange

    •  

      @Ausdave : "I advise you not to lock yourself to this slow speed contract."

      It is a month by month "contract".

  • +10 votes

    12MBps? Is this broadband for ants? 🐜 🐜

    🐜

  • +1 vote

    I remember when I had to wait for things to load.

    Never again.

  • +6 votes

    Is this a joke?

    I'm never going back to anything less than 100Mbps…

  • -2 votes

    Good deal for those who wants to save some money.
    I would get this if NBN was available in my area.

    • +8 votes

      How is it good? Its the appropriate price. Not a bargain.

      CHEAP =/= BARGAIN

      A low-end price for a low-end product.

      12mbps is not going to be sufficient for most people especially when you can get 25mbps plans for $50.

      If you want to "save some money" don't buy anything. Buying stuff because it's cheap, despite severe limits on its usability, is not good value for money.

      •  

        Buying stuff because it's cheap, despite severe limits on its usability, is not good value for money.

        You should have words with my wife.

      • +5 votes

        If 12/1 does not impact my life negatively and I save at least $15 per month. That’s $180 per year of saving. Now value is subjective. To you, you may value speed over $180 of saving. But to me, I value the $180 over the speed.

        The only reason I need internet is for Netflix and 12/1 is more than enough.

        To answer your question of ‘Bargain’. Well so far I could only find this deal as the cheapest. Happy to be corrected and pointed to a cheaper comparable alternative.

        25/5 plan for $50? Which ISP?

        • -6 votes

          If you're so worried about $180/yr, maybe you should stop watching Netflix for 8+hrs each day and do something productive with your life.

          •  

            @KLoNe: if $180 a year is chump change to you, why are you even on ozbargain? like to look down on and sneer at those with different financial circumstances to you?

            you ought to take your own advice and do something other than post inflammatory and unproductive comments.

      •  

        Where is this nbn25 for $50? Sounds like BS

  • +3 votes

    Reminds me of the good ole days of transitioning from 56k dialup to ADSL 256/64k or 512/128k. Ah good times.

  • +4 votes

    Sorry bud. As good of a price this is, 12 Mbps just doesn't cut it anymore in 2019.

  •  

    It should support Netflix sd streaming, might be enough for some people… might be better off with a mobile contract though.

  • -1 vote

    Why…. I get you want to ensure your wholesale is enough to serve customers, but 12.. really? Ill get 3G broadband, cheaper and with more speed vs this

  •  

    Could be tempted at $49.90 for their 50mbps plan but otherwise this is pretty unattractive. won't neg it though because I guess there would be some people out there who might benefit from slow NBN (the lightest of light users, old people maybe?).

  •  

    ……12Mbps…..vomits

    I was stuck on 4Mbps adsl2+ from 2003 till 2015 now I'm on 100/40 no way I can slower than that.

    • +1 vote

      Still on 4Mbps. Consider yourself lucky.

      •  

        awww why?

        Nah no way lucky, the average ADSL2+ speeds were between 10 - 17Mbps. Some lucky people that lived next door to the exchange could get 22Mbps

        •  

          I got 23,466/1024 & no outages for my entire 13 years on iinet adsl 2+

          I'm a lucky boy being so close to the exchange.

          •  

            @iamhurtin: What r u getting now with NBN?

            •  

              @Homr: HFC connection into unit - Aussie bb 100/40
              (about to churn to someone else) )

              Get 94/35 on average

              Best torrent speed I've got was 10.4MB/S

              Hoping belong's starter will get me close to 50mb

              I don't use my net in peak times, so as long as there is no buffering during football at 2am I'm sweet!

        •  

          Some older apartment units just dont get nbn yet

        • +2 votes

          Because the exchange I'm on is running equipment older than I am and there's 4km of copper between that exchange and me. But hey, it's a good thing the government bought that copper for the NBN or else it would go to waste /s

          • +2 votes

            @potplanty: Seeing as Howard /Costello /abbot, hate a quick, functioning network, do they insist on having dial up at their places still?

            Amazing how 3 man could cripple our infrastructure for years.

            Talk about leaving a legacy

          •  

            @potplanty: If it makes you feel better, Telstra won the lucrative maintenance contract for their nasty old copper that they sold to the NBN. So definitely not wasted. If you are Telstra :D

            Oh BTW, NBN loves copper so much we are still purchasing new copper too. We bought ~15000 km more recently that we had to source from Brazil and India, as even China couldn't supply the obsolete specs we are after.

  •  

    Only for 6 months ?????

    •  

      Where did you see that?

      • +1 vote

        Conditions

        Plans must include unlimited data and be an nbn 12 service plan (guarantee does not apply to alternative nbn, home broadband, wireless or mobile service plans)
        Price beat guarantee only available on nbn 12 plan (Basic speed tier)
        Must be compared with standard monthly pricing, excluding any time sensitive promotional discounts e.g. $10 off for the first 6 months
        Competitor prices must be general advertised prices (not personalized offers over the phone etc.)
        Price beat guarantee does not take into consideration additional/optional extras for the nbn connection e.g. Modem cost, connection fees, call packages

        •  

          That's T&C for price beat policy ?

          •  

            @phunkydude: it is the link for the "see conditions" of the the offer.

            •  

              @jv: Did you miss the top and bottom part , and only copy the middle section ?

              FLIP’S PRICE BEAT GUARANTEE
              Find a cheaper comparable unlimited nbn 12 plan (Basic speed tier) and we’ll beat it by 5%.
              Conditions
              Plans must include unlimited data and be an nbn 12 service plan (guarantee does not apply to alternative nbn, home broadband, wireless or mobile service plans)
              Price beat guarantee only available on nbn 12 plan (Basic speed tier)
              Must be compared with standard monthly pricing, excluding any time sensitive promotional discounts e.g. $10 off for the first 6 months
              Competitor prices must be general advertised prices (not personalized offers over the phone etc.)
              Price beat guarantee does not take into consideration additional/optional extras for the nbn connection e.g. Modem cost, connection fees, call packages
              How do I obtain the 5% reduction?
              Find and record the cheaper price- via photo or web screenshot
              Tell us about it- Give us a call or send us an email with the record. You can also put a web link into the additional notes section on the sign up form
              Wait for approval- Once approved, we’ll amend your plan with the matched price

        •  

          The bold part in the T&C is an example of a 'time sensitive' promotional discount. I don't think it's stating that the FlipConnect discount will only last for 6 months.

  • +2 votes

    the old dial up connection sound still haunts me

  • -1 vote

    Should have just paid David Teoh to build our NBN instead.

  •  

    Couldn’t deliver 25 on a 50 plan - wouldn’t be surprised if fly out can only get 6 during peak hours!

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