This was posted 4 months 3 days ago, and might be an out-dated deal.

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Howard Shore - The Lord of The Rings: The Return of the King - Complete Recordings 6LP Green Vinyl $99 Delivered @ Amazon AU

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Average selling price on Discogs is $196. Rarely goes on sale, best price new I've ever seen!

https://www.discogs.com/Howard-Shore-The-Lord-Of-The-Rings-T...

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  • +6 votes

    +1 for my all time favourite OST

  • +1 vote

    Grabbed it, thanks OP :)

  • +1 vote

    Got it, thanks OP!

  • +1 vote

    Legend, cheers mate. Just need Fellowship now!

    • +3 votes

      There's bound to be a repress for sure. I wouldn't go spending crazy money on the one from last year.

      • +1 vote

        A while ago I asked Rhino records on twitter when they're going to do a repress but they didnt respond, but you're right, they released fewer of the fellowship than the other two so without a repress alot of people arent going to be able to complete their collections!

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          I really do hope for a re-release :) Just a random Q though, where can we find the numbering of the record (if it exists)? I think I read somewhere that people know what number they are

          • -1 vote

            @lyoo01: IIRC the number is on a sticker on the inside of the front cover

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            @lyoo01: The number is stamped into the back (bottom left) of the case. There's a track sheet covering the number when you get it sealed so you'll either have to nudge it up to see the number or just open it.

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          It was silly of them to release the fellowship in a low limited numbered (5000) quantity, when there are far more who've been waiting for it. They could've just re-released an unnumbered edition already.

  • +3 votes

    You could just use a filter on your digital copies, to add wow & flutter, add noise and reduce the dynamic range.

    • +1 vote

      Yeah, or you could concede vinyl is an awesome way to own musical physical media, often has better dynamic range and discover that enjoyment goes beyond metrics.

      • +6 votes

        While I do like vinyl, given that nowadays most recording is done digitally, I struggle with the concept that transferring digitally recorded sound to an analog medium somehow increases its dynamic range or makes the recording sound better.

        • +4 votes

          Sorry, that was such a "troll" - I needed my morning coffee - but being so blatant, more a gentle tease that the more nasty malicious recent use of the word.

          Digital, or even CDs, have never managed to replace the feel of flicking through your LP collection. Sometimes the physical medium does matter, and the technical characteristics of vinyl are more than adequate.

          transferring digitally recorded sound to an analog medium somehow makes the recording sound better.

          Depends what you mean by "sounds". Good visual presentation makes food taste better, so why shouldn't a large album cover, and weight in your hand while loading the player make an album sound better?
          No need to try explaining Nyquist–Shannon sampling theorem to audiophiles. Perception matters more than maths here.

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            @manic: I wasn't responding to your comment, but I agree with most of your sentiments.

            My point was that it's not possible to use "better dynamic range" as an argument for vinyl's superiority when recordings are often done digitally and the dynamic range doesn't magically increase by transferring a digital recording to an analog medium.

            As for subjective perceptions of sound quality, I'm not going to tell someone that their individual views aren't valid. I'll just tell them that they has no basis in objective measurable reality if they try to claim that it does.

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              @Nomadesque: I think people who argue that vinyl sounds 'better' are mostly just parroting an old sentiment.

              Anyone who's cared to look into it enough knows that it's a subjective experience.

              People just are used to / prefer certain things. The grainy warmth of a record on a player is one example. Just like how pop songs all use very similar chord structures, or how in some video games there is the option for the 'cinematic film' effect.

              As someone who operates in the digital sphere due to convenience (screw carrying crates of vinyl to every gig), even I can't deny the enjoyment surrounding the tangible feeling of physically owning my favourite albums and being able to flick through them on my shelf (I don't even own a record player anymore lol) .

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          You are very right that the recording and mixing is one of the most important aspects of sound - but digital recording and mastering is very different to digital media like CD. While amazing for its time, CD has very fixed constraints on the audio it can represent. (Good) Vinyl can do bass far better than CD. SACD and DVD-Audio (and subsequent blu-ray based audio) were attempts to fix it, but far too late - few audio engineers were left that knew how to mix like they did in the 80's.

          • -1 vote

            @norkle: Fortunately I'm not talking about CD recordings otherwise I would have mentioned them.

            The point I'm making is that it is physically impossible for the objectively measurable aspects of a digital recording to improve upon transfer to a vinyl medium.

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          I struggle with the concept that transferring digitally recorded sound to an analog medium somehow increases its dynamic range or makes the recording sound better.

          Exactly this. The background noise is digitally removed and altered. The older records would record the "air" of the music too which is all lost when pressing a digital recording to LP

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            @Cyphar: There was also a time when audio recordings were cut to vinyl directly.

            In those cases, the original vinyl recordings would have been the best possible version of the recording.

            Just thought I'd mention that to appease the anonymous negger who wasted three of their five daily down votes on my comments.

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              @Nomadesque: Direct-To-Disk recording is exactly the method I was referring to for capturing everything to give it that "fuller" feel. It hasn't been done for a long time. All LP's pressed these days are done from a digital copy so it's not as magical

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                  @Vieira4: I'd love to know of some recent releases that have been (IE, last 30 years). It's a notoriously difficult method to use so no major band/musician has employed it in a very long time given it would require recording sessions for both D2D as well as digital recordings, and a quick google search hasn't helped either

    •  

      Everyone got so serious but I chuckled

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    SO, not having bought anything on vinyl since CDs came along, do the current manufacturers of vinyl give a full run down for each disc of the pressing specifications, noise floor, source material quality, etc? How do you know what you are buying?

  •  

    Thanks got it for $79 using a promo code received from Monopoly Maccas!!

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      Nice, I might try my luck and get some of those tickets today. Didn't realise there was a prize in the form of an Amazon discount.

      Are they particularly difficult to win?

  •  

    Price seems to have gone up :(

  • +1 vote

    Fellowship a better sound track.

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    Bought the audio CD / bluray 5.1 version and absolutely love it

  •  

    It's still $99 with prime. Click on more buying options.

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