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Free Course - Agile Scrum Course: Scrum Fundamentals | Scrum Certification @ Udemy

890
OCT2019FREEBIE

This best seller course is currently free for a limited time.

Rated 4.3 (1850), 19,199 students.

What you'll learn

  • Apply Scrum your projects
  • Deliver value to the business with Scrum
  • Deliver projects faster with Scrum
  • Master the different Scrum concepts
  • Master the different Scrum tools
  • Master the Scrum Values, Scrum Principles and Scrum Pillars
  • Understand the history of Scrum
  • Understand the differences between Scrum and traditional Project Management or Waterfall

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Comments

  • +8 votes

    10 seconds into preview and I am put off. Presenter is an 'Agile certified senior project manager'. WTF. As someone that's been a Scrum Master for 10 year…I have to say that sentence makes no sense and means jack shit.

    Firstly there is no 'agile certified' there is no such organisation. And seniority is not a thing in an agile team and a Project Manager is not even an agile /scrum recognised role!

    So WTF?

    There's probably some knowledge a newbie can pick up but please still listen to your own Scrum Master at work!

    • +3 votes

      Has the word scrum master been around for 10 years?

      •  

        Not really, better part of a decade from what I've seen in the field

      • +5 votes

        Sure has. I was trained by one of the first 30 certified trainers in the world offered in 2006 by scrum alliance and the only one at the time Kane Mar in Aus…in 2009. ;)

      • +1 vote

        I know scum master been around longer than that…. Like forever. Whoever added the extra R was not necessary. We don't need to be certified for "scam/scum" master

    • +1 vote

      DSDM has been around since the 90s and you can even get agile project management certification in PRINCE2 these days

      scrum and project management don't fit well. But it's not complete rubbish.

    •  

      Like 99% of Udemy courses, they are a joke. You’re not going to learn anything useful.

      • +2 votes

        Not true. I did a course in under 2 hours a few weekends ago and it helped me with coding I hadn't done before that I needed for work. Not all courses are good but they're not all junk either. I could have learnt the same from a book but not in that amount of time.

    • +1 vote

      If there is no such organisation, there is no organisation to stop other organisations from offering an "agile certification". Thus, there are dozens of companies that offer processes to become agile certified practitioners.

      https://www.cio.com/article/3201284/7-agile-certifications-t...

      Top 8 agile certifications
      PMI-ACP
      APMG International
      Strategyex Certificate (Associate or Master’s) in Agile
      International Consortium for Agile (ICAgile)
      Agile Certification Institute
      Scaled Agile Academy
      Scrum Alliance
      Certified Agile Project Manager (IAPM)

      • +3 votes

        Yep there's heaps of people trying to monetise the knowledge, even tho the knowledge is free and actually comes from practice and learning!

        The only 2 certification bodies recognised in Aus by recruiters and companies for true scrum practioners are really Scrum Alliance and Scrum.org. Scrum Alliance one by far however you must attend paid course by a certified trainer. Scrum.org allows self studying and test is alot more harder.

        A distant 3rd place would be PMI ACP, for waterfall project managers that wants to say they are agile.

        Please do not waste your time or money getting any other certificate.

        WTF…why did someone neg this comment, it's legit advice?

    • +2 votes

      So its Scam Master rather than Scrum Master?

      •  

        It's not the SMs fault for the industry to become commercialized. Most SMs don't care for certificate not is the hiring managers that wants to see the badging.

  •  

    Thank you, I am looking to be Scrum Manager or Agile Master etc. soon

    • +1 vote

      You mean a project master dev scum manager?

    • +6 votes

      All you have to do is learn to make burn down charts, move story cards in Jira, and define the word 'done'. Congrats you are now a certified Scrum Master.

      • +3 votes

        Don't forget the "fun" retro "games".

      • -1 vote

        Actually if you use JIRA,the burn down chart is generated automatically for you.

        You don't move story cards in JIRA, I think you mean 'transition the issue card thru workflow'.

        And DoD is something the team defines…the SM shouldn't be defining it for the team.

        But i get your point.

        There's plenty more jobs to being a SM for real…

      •  

        you forgot that you need to create 100 JIRA boards

      •  

        And then you can call yourself "epic" and fully "agile" and then start delegating like a boss to project managers and developers. "burn charts" down on them like a boss

  •  

    A message from "the inventor" of Agile (from one of them). :)
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a-BOSpxYJ9M

    •  

      Dave Thomas is NOT the inventor of agile nor scrum, buddy. Dave Thomas was one of the signatories that proposed (saying he agrees with) the ideas of needing to be more 'agile'. Which was named Agile Manifesto.

      The agile manifesto is related to but NOT Scrum framework- which this course focuses on. For that you mean Ken Schwaber and Jeff Sutherland has been credited in the west as the inventor of Scrum.

      BTW that video (even tho the title says) is not truely about agile being dead. He just suggested it needs to be viewed from a different perspective now that it is being mis-practised…

      •  

        Can you share any good free courses or books/sites to get up to speed?

        • +1 vote

          If you are a beginner, just reading the official bibles of agile and scrum knowledge at agilemanifesto and scrumguides.org

          For a more in-depth understanding you might want to attend (or ask your dev manager, or scrum master to) a paid course to get the best quality knowledge from experienced trainers…or give me a shout on PM ;)

      •  

        He said that Agile as an industry and a qualification is abhorrent and needs to die. He advocates Agility in the sense of taking small incremental steps towards your goal and learning from mistakes to correct next steps, not an Agile methodology industry. They really aren't the same thing at all.

  • +15 votes

    The trick is to constantly bother people about how they’re getting on with their work and promise to try do something about any problems they reckon they’re having.

    • +5 votes

      And don't forget to insist that in order to be Agile the dev team should accept continually changing software requirements - yes even if that's mid sprint! Not that I'm bitter..

      • +3 votes

        Changing requirement of a piece of work mid-sprint is anything but agile, it causes disruptions, rework and frustration. It is infact wasteful and the opposite of what agile encourage, which is to be lean and focus on what's most important.

        On the opposite end you also do not want to lock in all requirements of a product upfront, as it binds the team to just build what they think is the right product, rather than getting feedback and only build what is desired/actually useful as told by the users.

        Scrum also calls out clearly you are not suppose to change the requirements mid sprint. A good product owner or scrum master would work with the team to avoid doing it, there's plenty of ways, but your case may have been a mis-practise…

        • +1 vote

          This. Cannot agree more that agility is being abused way too much by saying changes are required, just need to complete them in a "quicker/smarter/agile" manner.

          I have been hearing "scrum" at work lately but haven't really looked into it much- any good materials to begin with?

          •  

            @Craze: Hire a good scrum master…I am looking for new team/company to transform ;P Perm or contract or even day rate, training and/or embedded as a team member are all ok. PM me! ;)

            • +1 vote

              @hippo2s: Quick question - How do you transform a team of 6 with only one member able to do the work?

              •  

                @pig: Have a restructure to a team of one?

              •  

                @pig: Agile and associated knowledge recommends a few things which could help here.

                We want to build a team. You have a problem here if only 1 person can contribute to building of the product. So reorganise. This is not a fault of being agile, in fact it is probably a good indicator you should become a more agile team.

                We want team members to cross train and learn off each other in order to build a more robust team. Again it sounds like your 'team' needs to do alot of work here.

                What's the other 5 people doing?

                •  

                  @hippo2s:

                  What's the other 5 people doing?

                  So one is a ex DBA in the 80s that takes 2 days just to write hello world, A project manager, support analyst, business analyst, and very diligent but very manual tester.

                  cross train and learn off each other in order to build a more robust team.

                  This sounds good but in reality but chances of succeed is very low when the culture and identity of the individuals mismatched

                  So reorganise.

                  Whats the agile speak for this?

                  •  

                    @pig: In agile and scrum we say that agile and scrum is not the cause or sometimes the solution to your organisational problems, however it is really good at making issues transparent and the team needs to take a honest hard look at itself and ask the question…do we have the right composition of the team?

                    In this case it sounds like a startup or legacy product team (my guess is legacy, since you have DBA, and a PM) if the business/team wants to change for the benefits of becoming more adaptable and responsive to customer needs then they have to make some changes.

                    If the product is legacy product, stable, and towards end of it's product lifecycle then there may not be any point in becoming agile. In which case the conversation/transformation is a 'whats next on the horizon for the company' discussion.

                    If it is desirable to become agile, then yes you have a culture and team composition that is not very agile, need to look at medium term plan on how to encourage team collaboration etc.

                    •  

                      @hippo2s: Remember agile and scrum is really good for teams that are developing a new product for customers / marketplace that is changing and moving.

                      If your product is done already and you are in support and fixes and no long term feature development then you ought to look at using Kanban (another way to practice agile) to support defects and support task management.

              • +2 votes

                @pig: create elaborate ceremonies that make the other 5 seem busy

        •  

          Yep agree with it all. Unfortunately our team have no buffer who know what Agile actually is and the business use it to beat us over the head about not being 'Agile' enough. I mean no one wants to go back to waterfall but hell this changing horses mid sprint stuff is no good either.

      •  

        And don't forget to insist that in order to be Agile the dev team should accept continually changing software requirements - yes even if that's mid sprint! Not that I'm bitter..

        THIS!

        I have been fully employed as a software developer since 1993 (with a 3 year break for uni). The below is MY experience. I can't generalize it to everyone's company or project.

        In my experience this is how testers and the business interpret Agile if there are no checks and balances put in place. "Oh you're 'Agile'. That means you have to respond quickly. We say jump, you say how high. Even if it's a lot of work and has no substantial business benefit, while there is critical work with hard external deadlines to do that this will interrupt. Oh you don't think you can get it done? You mustn't be Agile enough. Clearly we need to hire someone else or force you to do training during that already impossible deadline.".

        You want to know the secret to decent software development? Everyone involved has to understand that it's a technical undertaking with a business focus. They have to be willing to understand the fine details instead of fob them off onto the "IT propeller heads". They have to respect their IT staff enough to give them input into the design process. They have to realize that even business people can request garbage with no business benefit, and that some changes that sound easy are actually very very hard or impossible. Then you have to get together and formulate a cohesive plan. The details of that plan can change as both technical and business details come to light, but the better your first approximation is (within the limits of not getting bogged down with unimportant junk in making that spec), the better your end product.

        In other words Agile/Agility isn't an excuse for not having a clue what your system is going to do, how your business works, or how software will fit in. A changing target due to changing business circumstances and environment is fine. One of the senior managers deciding they had a dream last night that's going to revolutionize everything but that'll require a complete rewrite of most of the system at the last minute is not what Agility helps you with. If you have a half baked plan, constantly changing that half baked plan through the whole development process isn't going to improve it.

        One thing Agility does help with is that it doesn't separate design and implementation. There are circumstances for which that separation is necessary but it requires a lot of discipline to get it right. If you let your developers and end users have some say in the way they solve the problem, it really helps and Agile does force this to some degree due to the nature of the process. And of course you have to have the business have their input as well if you want the system to actually meet their needs.

    •  

      But don't forget to send them to mandatory "mindset" training first.

  • +2 votes

    Are we talking about rugby here?

    • +10 votes

      Yes, the raiders have signed up for this course. I do believe they lost the match due to their poor agility in the scrum pack. Hopefully all the boys get certified before next season.

      •  

        I get the joke but they more likely lost the match from all the beer they drank straight after the semi-final. Most of the raiders 'athletes' being interviewed were holding a beer. Guess they haven't worked out how detrimental that is to their body straight after a game. Fine for the GF but not for any other final. Maybe certified AA might help better.

  • +3 votes

    It truly is a disease

  •  

    I clicked hoping this was about rugby. After reading the comments I am definitely disappointed…

    •  

      Idk if it's only me but the word scrum always reminds me of 'scum' or 'scrotum'. Why do they call it this….

    •  

      I dunno, are you sure? You often get a lot of argy bargy in a software development project. ;-)

  •  

    Do i get a certificate or recognition after completing the course?

    •  

      A certificate that isn't worth the electricity you use to load the page to display 'yay I am certified''

  •  

    Came for the scrum. Disappointed that it relates to something that's not rugby, but ultimately satisfied because of the use of the word scrum.