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[SA] Free Adoption of 6mo+ Cats @ RSPCA SA

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This Christmas we are asking you to please, please give a home to adult cats in our care. By adopting a cat over the next 12 days we promise that you'll be changing two lives this Christmas ❤️❤️

We have cats that have been patiently waiting… and waiting for their forever homes since as far back as July… There are cats that need a little extra TLC (and we'll even provide you with their medication should they need some!).

Cats are social loving creatures that deserve to be in a home, not a shelter. Because of this, we are waiving fees for all cats 6 months and over. Donations for adoptions will be welcomed, as this will continue to help us care for the hundreds of cats that will continue to need our care over Christmas.

Can you help change the life of a cat? Visit our Lonsdale shelter between the 13th - 24th of December and make a world of difference to a small, but significant life 🥰

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Comments

  • +40 votes

    PSA: Remember, a cat is for life. Not for Christmas.

    • +1 vote

      Are they costly/difficult to look after? I never owned a cat, so although I would like to adopt one I am afraid I will neglect it as I live by myself and can hardly take care of myself. My neighbor has one so I might ask her of what it takes to own a cat.

      • -7 votes

        If you get the right breed and let it go outside they maintain themselves and you just need to feed them once or twice a day. Maybe it'll get fleas but cats are easy to take care of.

        • +12 votes

          PSA: Dont let your cat go outside, many adoption places wont let you adopt a cat if you admit its going to go outside. Cats kill native animals and plus people are assholes. One day your cat may never come home and you may never find out what happened.

          • -4 votes

            @CheapStuffIDontNeed: Yeah you're not meant to are you?
            I see plenty of cats outside I think they enjoy it.
            Scratching their claws on trees, chasing around, sun baking, etc.
            They bury and hide their toilet mess so it's good for everyone.
            True though they can disappear.

          • +9 votes

            @CheapStuffIDontNeed: Cats are just as individual as people. You just can not summarise every cats' personality and nature in a few sentences. They can be placid; aggressive; attention seeking; independent;indoors; outdoors; lap sitter; playful; lazy; but they always enjoy eating, pooping and especially sleeping.

            Having had many cats over my life, I know this. If you adopt an older cat be aware that they are animals of habit. What they have been used to with a previous family, they will want to do when they get to a new home. They will probably hide somewhere for a few days as they will be nervous of a new home. Let the cat take its time getting comfortable. Also keep them inside for at least a week or 2 so they get accustomed to the house and the new environment, otherwise there is a very real chance that they will run away.

            Not all cats kill birds. Our one just looks at them as some curiosity and occasionally even runs away from them. Certainly an exception to the rule. Most will at least chase them but they are excellent at keeping mice away.

            Just my 3 cents. Inflation, you know.

          • +1 vote

            @CheapStuffIDontNeed: Had an outdoor cat for 15years. He was a white cat And sadly lost him to skin cancer and nasal tumor in his nose. He loved the outdoors and running, jumping, sleeping deep in the grass, shrubs and trees. He loved life. Cold winter days he was sleeping in my room. Other days he was outside. You bring him inside, he’d wait in front of the door to go outside. It depends how they’re raised but I don’t think you should jail them indoors their whole life. They’re social, domesticated and semi wild creatures.

          • -4 votes

            @CheapStuffIDontNeed: Ohoho I know what cats do outside.
            SCREW each other and sound like dying babies

      • +3 votes

        Feed it in the morning, then at night. Sift out clumping litter tray once a day topping up as necessary. Put out scratching posts and scratch trays throughout your house. Buy a portable cat carrier. Get everything at Kmart (except the litter).
        Continuous Outgoings: food, litter, flee and worm meds.

      • +3 votes

        too difficult to answer your question, as everyone is different. couldn't and still can't look after myself. but i can look after them.

        both our cats were freebie kitteh hobos from rspca, and i disliked cats prior to adoption. loved them ever since. i say i won't cry when they die off one day, but i probably will!

      • +1 vote

        Low maintenance, they need a box with sand as a toilet and a bit of cat food that it's cheap. Since you live alone you will enjoy the company, an apartment is more appropriate being easier to keep it in.

      •  

        Depending on the size of the cat, one can of cat food (80c at Aldi) could last for 2-4 days. And if the cat is allowed to go outdoors, no additional cost for cat litter. It's pretty rare a cat would need to go to the vet, if you're lucky it will be injury-free throughout it's life.

      • +1 vote

        Only if you are committed to having them as your forever pets and not giving up on them when it gets too hard/moving/baby/new partner situation etc lol. That being said, cats are easy and low maintenance. If you are worried about the cat getting lonely adopt two (might sound extreme and crazy) but two cats are much better than one because they play (eg bite) with each other instead of your hands and feet. If you are worried you may not cope adopt from a rescue that offers no obligation free trial. Many of them do! The only thing is when they get sick it can be costly and the usual maintenance thing like flea med, worming tabs and annual vaccines. Food and litter is not too expensive

      •  

        what's your rental situation/state rental laws like? or are you one of that rare breed, a house owner?

    •  

      9 lifes to be exact.

  •  

    noticed this hasn't been in nsw for a while (free kitten/cat from rspca). wonder why??

  • +1 vote

    Is it valid to downvote this deal because it's a really horrible idea on RSPCA's behalf.
    A pet is not something that should be purchased on a whim. At least $100 makes people think about it.

    •  

      why $100? makes it less accessible for seniors, pensioners and low income earners doesn't it? (yes, trading one generalisation for another)

      • +5 votes

        Lol I’m sorry but if they can’t afford 100 dollar to adopt the cat they cannot afford the yearly vaccinations and the flea and worming stuff and also if something comes up vet bill etc. 100 dollars usually include the council registration, desex and microchip it already is a steal . Giving it for free just let’s more people adopt irresponsibly (also some people use cats for baiting) and then higher possibility of the cat being uncared for anyway. The amount of cats that end up being surrendered back to the pound after being ‘’adopted’ is pretty disgusting :(

    • +1 vote

      Maybe for the timing as it is just before Christmas. As mentioned earlier a cat is for life, not just a Christmas present. I would think it would be better to do this a month or 2 after Christmas as there will probably be an influx of pets as the novelty wears off after gifting one as a present.

    • +1 vote

      You are not purchasing a pet, you are adopting. Not to mention their shelter is probably overloading and they have to let some cats to new homes. The cats may not end up in a good home but if left in RSPCA they will probably be euthanised by new year.

    • +4 votes

      As a long term committee member (and former President until recently of a local cat rescue) I agree with you (Zondor) regarding the giving away (or in some cases - putting on sale at cheap prices) of rescue animals. Yes we had some that were in care for up to around 2 years but eventually the right person came along willing to pay the adoption fee. I am not saying that every person who can't afford the fee will turn out to be a bad and negligent owner but offering the animals free or cheap encourages people who may not either have best intentions or adopt the animal on a whim despite the rigorous adoption process certain rescues may go through (and even some people who paid the full fee turned out to be ar$eholes). If the adoptee can only "afford" the free animal can they afford to take it for vet care in future when it needs upkeep, further vaccinations, flea/worm treatments etc or becomes ill or injured. All that being said it can be a bit of six of one, half a dozen of the other but my personal opinion is that animals just shouldn't be treated like "goods" and put on sale.

    • +3 votes

      The cat is going to be put down if nobody takes it. That is their fate. There is a flood of cuter kittens coming in the new year which will bump the older cats into death row.

      Even if it is back at RSPCA in a few months that was a few months of hopefully being pampered and a free space for the post Christmas flood.
      RSPCA effectively got foster care for the period.

      Better they take a free cat from RSPCA now than pay a backyard dealer a cent for one and encourage that industry.

      • +1 vote

        It's better that a cat be put down than left with a person who doesn't take care of it properly.

    • -1 vote

      @Zondor …. totally agree with you on all your points here. Too many naysayers in this thread.

  •  

    how much usually would it cost to adopt a cat?

    • +3 votes

      Can't speak for the RSPCA but the rescue I was involved in had a fee of $180 for a cat that was desexed, microchipped, fully vaccinated (F3 and FIV), FIV tested, and had monthly worm and flea treatments while in foster care. From my experience $180 is around what most rescues offer as an adoption fee but it can vary.

      • +3 votes

        And $180 is an absolute BARGAIN compared to what the average person would have to pay for even a backyard bred moggie. They don’t have to pay for vet checkup/chip/vacc/neuter/food/litter/worming/etc. yet a lot of people STILL bitch about $180!!! Makes you wonder what happens when the animal gets sick :(

  • +3 votes

    I pray that the RSPCA do rigorous background checks, as free adoptions will only draw out the psychos, animal abusers, and people that will neglect them after christmas.

    • -3 votes

      RSPCA doesn't give a shit. Cats are a top killer of wildlife in Australia. They want to get rid of costs of taking care of them while not risking donation money.

      • +1 vote

        It’s more economical to put them down than keep giving them away.

        •  

          RSPCA doesn't give a shit.

          no better than horse racers and greyhounds

          😠

          It’s more economical to put them down than keep giving them away.

          same with repeat offenders let out every few years

    •  

      idk my ex just got one from there, our kids are over the moon. she's great with cats, was about time she got another one.

  • -1 vote

    Are these free-range?

  •  

    I love cats but they kill so many indigenous animals that it is probably better they are extremely limited.

    • +2 votes

      Not indoor ones.

    •  

      Ironically, kangaroos are also pests and the government are killing off koalas as they're over populated in some areas.

    •  

      There are plenty of cats in the suburbs that might only catch rodents or the occasional common bird though.

      People owning cats that live next to conservation parks bear the most responsibility for native wildlife kills by felines.

      •  

        in darwin there were a lot of native animals in the suburbs but of natives my housemate's backyard moggies only really caught the common doves. felt bad once when one of them caught some hopping native rat, but mostly it was introduced rats, mice & the peaceful doves. still, the body count for prey was pretty high until those moggies hit two or three and then got super fat & lazy.

    •  

      That’s the owners fault for letting their cats roam. Most rescue places now emphasised on keeping the cats that indoor due to that specific reason. And my cat lives indoor and doesn’t care for the outside. A cat that lives purely indoor has a much higher lifespan than a cat that is allowed to roam

  • +1 vote

    Cool deal, but having it around Xmas time is totally going to have people buying pets as presents without thinking too much about the costs and responsibilities.

  • +2 votes

    Adopted a cat a few years ago for around $180. The price shouldn't be the consideration when thinking about adopting/buying a pet. A free animal is just encouraging dumb decisions.

    BaD iDeA rSpCa mk?

  • +1 vote

    One gripe i have with my local rspca is not properly listing if a cat has a medical condition. i went down one day after work and spent a good 2 hours checking out what they had, and then made a decision. However when i got to the counter they then mentioned this particular cat had a medical condition and requires daily treatment and higher care than usual. Working full time and not being home much this wouldnt be fair on the cat and i wouldnt be the right type of owner. Im just annoying they dont put this info on the cats bio for you to see upfront. There was this absolutely gorgeous one eyed cat named jack which i still remember to this day, fluffy, relaxed, loved cuddles, but someone had already put a deposit on him. I hope he went to an excellent home.

    •  

      Im just annoying they dont put this info on the cats bio for you to see upfront.

      This is a common marketing technique. Eye level is buy level. They hope you see, play and fall in love with the goods before you take it to the counter. It makes the purchase so much more difficult to resist.

      • +2 votes

        I dont think "marketing tricks" and "adopting an animal for life" should be a tactic employed.

        •  

          if it saves the animal's life then maybe they think it's worth a shot y'know. moral proximity often works.

          •  

            @kiteo: Short term maybe, however after a few months the new owner may get tired of the extra care a sick animal requires, and just dump it back at the adoption center.

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