HELP! Choosing The Right Super

Which super has lower admin, brokerage, investment management fees if I'm after some percent of my super to be invested in one of the Vanguard ETF? (I want to choose for one particular ETF Vanguard). Hostplus ChoicePlus? Sunsuper? ING Super?

Comments

  • +1 vote

    i think hostplus has $79 annual admin fee

    then go for indexed balanced (not choiceplus) at 0.04% investment fee

    it's 37.5% aussie shares 37.5% international shares … remaining is FD/bond/cash

    •  

      I wanted to choose forna specific index fund that I am after. That is why I brought up ChoicePlus

      •  

        WHich is the Vanguard ETF you feel you strongly about that is a must have? VDHG? As for super you'd want an index fund, as active funds have been shown over long term not to be able to match indexes and the fees, which are one of the only variables you can control are much lower.

        Whats the ballpark of the super balance you're moving? As the fees for Choiceplus are much higher (I am with Hostplus myself, have been for over 20yrs).

        IMHO phunkydude's tip is exactly what I'd have said. Or DIY your own via the Intl index share options (hedged or not) and also IMF Aust shares, which is an index product with very low fees. You can even add some div fixed interest on if you need etc

  •  

    Worth remembering that lowest fees /= best bang for buck.

    I believe HostPlus while it is cheapest on market hasn't performed as well as other similar options.

  •  

    FYI. Depending on your age and health you want to cancel death insurance. From memory it's between $500 and $1000, ends up being more costly than management fees.

    •  

      Only cancel death insurance if you are sure you won't die and you have other life insurance policies.

      Also be aware that if you do not nominate the beneficiary with a "binding agreement" every couple of years the super fund trustees will give the money to whomever they choose.

      •  

        Only cancel death insurance if you are sure you won't die and you have other life insurance policies.

        you can die and don't need life insurance if you don't have dependents (wife kids old folks)

        Also be aware that if you do not nominate the beneficiary with a "binding agreement" every couple of years the super fund trustees will give the money to whomever they choose.

        need to re-nominate "every couple of years" ?

        is this blanket statement or specific to certain super fund ?

        •  

          All super funds require you to renew your binding agreement periodically. Most are in the 2-3 year range.

          •  

            @iratepirate: and i guess they hid it somewhere in T&C, never notify us? coz i never got a notice to renew even once

            •  

              @phunkydude: If you disagree with how the trustees wish to distribute the payment then you have to do it in court. If you don't have a recent binding agreement you will lose. Source:- My wife's boyfriend walking off with half her super and death benefit rather than our disabled child.

  •  

    Your question should be reworded, as it is confusing people with the general info.

    "Which super fund has the lowest admin fees and investment management fees for cash and ASX ETF investments only."

    FWIW, I don't know the answer, but would be interested. Probably also want to consider life insurance costs in the decision.

  •  

    Look at http://www.spaceship.com.au

    I work in IT for these guys, but I'm not a money person so I'm just Joe Average when it comes to knowing about this stuff.

    •  

      Ugh, well FWIW they do not look any good. Taking a flat 0.65% or 0.99% of balance each yr is very old school and poor IMHO. Better options out there.

  • +4 votes

    Everything about this thread is terrible.

    Your super is in cash for years? Really? And now you want to move it to a single ETF?
    How much are we talking?

    None of the above is relevant for the OP's question. They want to go to a specific type of investment vehicle. MGMT fees for these are always really high. It's rarely worth it for anything less than 250k.

    • +1 vote

      It's also a really bad idea…

    •  

      Yes, really. I was careless. Not moving now, in a stage to prepare to do once the current issue quiets down
      I haven't figured about the numbers yet. Yes, I want to go for a specific index fund (Vanguard)

      •  

        Just don't. There's (profanity) all benefit. A vanguard index fund essentially replicates what a well balanced super portfolio does but in an exchange tradeable product. To then use a super mechanism to buy that single fund is redundant, and as you've discovered, cost-prohibitive. You will be paying two management fees for no reason. it's not worth it, and i can only assume you've been reading US-based investment advice. r/personalfinance? It's not applicable here in the same way

  • +1 vote

    Australian Super Balanced Fund…. Leave it in cash until the current problems are sorted.

  •  

    QSuper is now open to the public to join, I have liked their fees so far.

  •  

    Vanguard will be opening their own super fund soon. Maybe hold on for that

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