Free access to eTG Complete (Electronic Therapeutic Guidelines) for Three Months

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Plenty of medicos on here to make use of this.
eTG (excellent evidence-based antibiotic and other therapeutic guidelines) has been released for free access until 31 July in light of COVID-19.

Includes app and website access. If you’ve previously held an account, access has apparently been reinstated automatically.

Usually costs $378/year for an individual subscription and very much more for entire practices/hospitals.

Obviously very niche guideline/subscription so mods please remove if inappropriate.

Related Stores

tg.org.au
tg.org.au

Comments

  • -2 votes

    These should be made free by the Government.

    Not sure why we have to pay hundreds to have access to therapeutic guidelines vital for patient care

    • +8 votes

      by your logic all ,all medical resources should be free? who would fund the development and work of the authors?

      • +3 votes

        No this is different, therapeutic guidelines is pretty much the gold standard in medical industry. It's an encylopedia of all the current literature collated into one source.

        • +7 votes

          You’re thinking of UpToDate

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            @blergmonkeys: That's not Australian unlike TG

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              @masster: eTG only provides basic guidelines for treatment of a small breadth of diseases. It does not go into depth on anything. I use it everyday for varying conditions that I already have a good grasp of. If it’s something I need to read up on to understand the current literature, I go to google scholar or UpToDate.

              eTG is not a collation of literature. UpToDate is and is vastly better referenced and broader in scale and depth. It is American but the differences in treatment between Australia and America are relatively minor and any good practitioner should be able to adapt it to our system if required.

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                @blergmonkeys: the fact is etg should be funded for health professionals to use in our daily practise…

                • +1 vote

                  @Oliver: Agreed.

                  But we can afford it. It’s really not that expensive when you add the tax deduction and taking into account our earning capacity. An annual subscription for a consultant is about 2-3 hours of wage. The vast majority of junior doctors will have it for free via their institution or training provider.

                  Also there are grants for rural practitioners that can cover this cost.

          • +1 vote

            @blergmonkeys: FYI Uptodate is free if you use a VPN to Norway.

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              @plasmapuff: This is awesome! Thanks mate.

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              @plasmapuff: Only apparently if associated with an institution login:
              "Clinicians in Norway:
              You now have access to UpToDate through your organization. If your organization does not have access to UpToDate, please ask your IT team to send its IP address to Helsebiblioteket. Learn more about what's changed. If you have already registered for an UpToDate account through your organization, you can log in now."

        •  

          It is generally considered the standard of care in Australia. You're much less likely to come into grief by following these guidelines than any others (medicolegally) - in opinion anyway.

    • +8 votes

      “ Therapeutic Guidelines is a not-for-profit organisation that exists to support the work of healthcare practitioners. ”

      It would cost the government the same amount to deliver it to the public for free, 99% of whom don’t need or can’t understand this type of service. Many might even misunderstand it, which could be dangerous.

    • +11 votes

      I disagree if you are referring to general public having access, it would make the Dr. Google like situations worse.
      Other resources and databases are also just as expensive.

    •  

      medical research is not cheap. reviewing (separating good research and bad research) and collating all this information into a single publication to allow quick reference for health professionals is also not cheap. It wouldn't make financial sense for governments to pay for access to these publications for the entire population. why not just provide access to the doctors trained to understand and analyse medical research and then these doctors can pass that information to individuals when they are sick and need it?

      •  

        Yet there are still lots of things missing from etg and also a lot of difference between this and other resources such as up to date.

    •  

      I agree with you. I think essentials like MIMS, uniform guidelines and basic information resources should be provided as free resources for all doctors by the government.

      I understand that it costs to produce but if we want a uniform quality in a universal health care system, then all providers should have equal access to basic common information resources.

  • +13 votes

    They are free for those that need to use it.

    Each state government pays for access to make it available at each hospital for free.

  • +1 vote

    Every place I've worked at my employer has provided the necessary references including this.

  •  

    I have to pay for this. It is worth it, apart from up to date, probably the best resource I use.

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    Never ever paid it until now. All the employers have always provided it. Along with pubmed, cinahl, cochrane etc. They even have private access after validating work email. I don’t know who pays for this may be GP s and independent practitioners? As someone previously mentioned ot should not be available for general public as it will make Dr Google situations bad from worse! I know people who have bought medications in their overseas trips and via the Internet which can be potentially dangerous

  •  

    Thanks OP, Mrs w has this at work, however app access when not there is a nice bonus.

  •  

    Victorian Health Channel provides the access free for any clinician working at a public service.

    As mentioned, all stares provide access free for their hospitals. Universities also often provide access for training clinicians.

    It is good GPs and private service staff are now able to access.

    As for the average community member, a little bit of knowledge around medical expectations can be a bad thing. That being said the eTG is well written and could actually stop the expectation of treatment for some presentations.

  • +4 votes

    Any Alternative Therapeutic Guidelines? My qi requires alignment.

  • +7 votes

    Its always been free if you are eligible to join the state library of Vic. Available online to all Victorians.

  •  

    Super handy, thanks. Got to read up on a few things I've been told by doctors and actually see what research it is based on. As a nerd who likes to read source articles, I got a lot of value from this. Will sign up via State Library of Vic once this expires.

  • +4 votes

    If you already have an account and logged in, where do you subscribe to the complimentary access? I only see the 1 year version for $378. Thanks

  •  

    thanks mine just expired

  •  

    have you tried focusing it. Practice your hand seals to get better at Ninjutsu.

  •  

    thanks for this

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