I Am Going to Buy New Camera, (Nikon Versus Canon) !

I had a Nikon D90 for more that 10 Years and now, It was died due to its time life.
Now, I wana buy new camera which is suit for me. I have few model in my mind as:
1- Nikon D7500
2- Nikon D5600
3- Canon 80D
4- Canon 90D

Some of the camera shops suggested me to buy Nikon D7500 which is similar to my old camera but other friends ask me to buy Canon 80D or 90D.

Any bodies could tell me which one s better and worse to buy!!

Or any other suggestion?

Comments

  • how many lense do u have in nikon? are they in reasonable condition?

    are u really keen on dslr?
    prolly stay with nikon if u have lenses thats the pricy part

    • I have only one Nikon Lens which is quiet old.

      I think DSLR cameras have more fun!!

      • old doesn't matter, as long as it works well.
        I also have the D90, and would stick with Nikon (unless you hated the D90)
        I also have 4 lenses, so more reason to stick with Nikon for me. Good thing mine still works well!

      • I had the Nikon D80 and decided it was time to replace it to get video capability, better processor, better resolution, better low light performance. I wanted to stay with Nikon because I have three good Nikkor F-mount lenses and a Speedlite. I decided against the D5600 as it is itself quite old now, and I decided not to get the D7500 and continue to invest in F-mount lenses when the move to mirrorless, with new mounts, is gathering pace. I decided to get the Nikon Z50 mirrorless body with twin lens kit and FTZ adpapter (allows me to use my old Nikkor F-mount lenses with full functionality). Got these for ~$1800 combined. Very happy with my choice, although if I only had one Nikon kit lens I would certainly have looked at Sony and Fujifilm APSC mirrorless cameras.

      • Nah, blondes have more fun.

        Have you considered a bridge camera? Having a fixed lens, they sure beat lugging a bunch of lenses around, and the top brands/models have heaps of features and give excellent results.

        https://au.pcmag.com/digital-cameras/44374/the-best-bridge-c...

    • "Obliterated"? Thats an overstatement mate. If someone wants to do cinematography or just a wanting a mirrorless camera, then sure get a sony alpha. Proper Photography is still dominated by DSLRs, gigantic pool of lens options, rugged body cameras, optical view finders rather than EVF, Much longer battery life, list goes on. Theres a reason why professional photographers like those who work for NatGeo use Hasselblads, 1DXs and 5Ds.

      • If you only have one lense like OP it doesn't really matter which system you go to.

        Most pros are tied into their system due to investment in lenses. Or pros need back up, I believe Canon offers loan programme if their equipment is out of service.

      • Would you care to bet a lunch and a beer on that? I'm happy to pay out if in 3 years from now, Sony is not the #1 with the other two facing bankruptcy, takeover or exiting camera business like Olympus did last month.

        Here is some food for thought:
        - https://www.macrotrends.net/stocks/charts/CAJ/canon/ebitda

        • And that ^^^ was before Covid-19

        • lol, what you're comparing now is exactly what is happening with the car industry in terms of Tesla and other mainstream brands such as BMW, Merc, Audi trying to catch up to EVs. Sure, mirrorless cameras in general are lighter, easier to use, slim and portable. It probably fits more for the general consumer to post photos onto instagram or make YouTube videos. But the purity and clarity of glass in lenses outweigh camera bodies, which this area is dominated by the likes of Zeiss, Canon and Hasselblad and Arri. And my stance on pros using DSLRs still stands (excellent example - Paul Nicklen).

          Olympus has been going down hill since 2011, the company is run by corrupt individuals that've been making fraudulent payment and cooking the books, where in the end, prison sentences were dished out to many corprate staff. So they had it coming to them for a very long time. To say that competitions of sony will be facing bankruptcy is like saying Tesla will be the only mainstream carbrand left in the world is just pure ignorance.
          But I must admit, this has been an interesting debate.

          • @AssBargain: Apples, oranges, cameras and cars… why not extend it into more hasty generalizations (livestock, tourism or airplane maker industries sound equally related). And then reach out for the "pure ignorance" conclusion… pure gold…

            FTR:
            - Nikon itself said their own camera production group needs to earn their own bread, or else… (see my previous link I shared). Nikon has pretty bad last year's report.
            - Sony is the supplier of Sensors for Nikon's high end cameras.
            - Speaking about the quality of glass, Zeiss is the largest supplier of Sony lenses by model numbers. Majority of high end Sony lens is made by Zeiss.
            - Focal length of Sony's full frame cameras allows for easy adaptation of other lenses (e.g. Canon's) - of course with adapters you lose some optical quality or lens automation but if you want to reuse your lens collection you can.

        • Ill take that bet.

          Clarification - facing bankruptcy means they have entered proceedings.

          If one of us manages to remember to call this bet that alone will be worth the price of a luncj and beer.

  • OP, What broke on your D90?

  • Which is your other Nikon lens?
    What kind of pictures did you take with the D90, and do you think that will change with the new camera?
    What is your budget and how important is photography to you?

    • Lens was original form when I bought it. I think it is 18-105mm
      I am taking more adventure + Journey and holiday photos
      I think I could effort upto $1600-1800

      • Get a D7200 and save the extra money. There are only minor differences between that and the D7500 which you will hardly notice. Buy the body only.

  • +6 votes

    Would recommend a mirrorless instead of a DSLR.

    • is it better?

      • Generally smaller bodies. Sony A7 full frame is smaller than SLRs. SLR needs the additional space for the prism and mirror.

        Mirrorless use LCD view finders so it isn't quite as clear as SLR using prism and mirrors. You also do get the millisecond black out when the mirror does its work.

  • I would go to a store and hold the four. Friends of mine swapped devices and found all the buttons were in new spots and this took them a long time to get used to.

    This is also a problem when upgrading from canon entry level to higher levels too.

  • The 80D was my very first camera I ever bought, came with the 18-135 kit lens. Really sturdy build, absolutely love the articulating screen which I now miss on my 5D MKIV. Could've bought it off me couple weeks ago for cheap lol.

    • hahaha,

      I really loved my D90. I think I will go for D7500. It is older that Canon90D and abit expensive but I think it should be a good choice.

  • I started with D90, then D7200(which is similar to D7500) and so on…. LOL. If you like nikon ergonomics and has nikon glasses (like D glasses), stay with D7000 and above series.

  • Sony RX100

  • Im a Canon person and ultimately I dont think it matters.

    Id base it on the lenses you have and what your friends use. Sharing equipment is awesome.

    Also consider mirrorless.

    • I don't like the mirrorless cameras, but it is 100% personal preference.
      100% agree on sharing lenses though, that is the ultimate determining factor.

      My friends have Canons, so I bought one, and my favourite lens to use (A Tamron) is one I bought off one of my friends.

  • Nikons for a bit, recently, have had some better specs in the low and mid tier. But it is so slight of an edge.
    That being said, if you're friends have Canons, get a Canon.

    Lenses are what matters, and they are the expensive bit. Your friends will no doubt let you borrow a lens for a holiday, or be wanting to offload a lens etc.

    You should consider getting a Pentax m42 screw adaptor, it'll let you use a lot of old lenses. They will be all manual, but they can produce interesting effects and some have nice Bokeh.

    EDIT: I forgot to add, Canons are normally better for adaptors than Nikons.

  • Hi, pro photographer here since 1962, and 25 yrs as a cinematographer.
    Please check out dpreview.com, read camera reviews and also guides. Figure out what you want to shoot, what the Canon didn’t do that you want. Forgot the whizz bang gimmicks. Check out Henri Cartier-Bresson - pocket sized cameras - he shot for the moment, the camera was irrelevant.
    My favourite cameras ever: a point and shoot Canon 35mm ML f1:9 fixed lens and wife’s Panasonic LUMIX TZ7. I had many better and classic lovely cameras, why these two? In my pocket, point, press, got the shot, and for personal pleasure. 99% of the time. Not as sharp as my heavy, control featured DSLRs. Far better got the shot scoreboard than a number of highly regarded Canons.
    Current camera since 2015 is a Fuji XE-1 mirrorless, chosen for MY personal Mecca, the ultra sharp shot, because of the sensor they use, and the artifacts it does not induce. Wife’s current point and shoot, a Panasonic TZ110 LUMIX get’s the shot, but the lens way too soft. Sharp? Never. Like my Canon EOS350D, didn’t cut it in the sharpness department.
    Research not just the cameras, but what YOU use them for, what results you want. Read the reviews with that in mind. Then by what you need.
    Good luck and think about the shots you have got that you loved, and those you missed. Buy the camera that will build on that! Most of all have fun, and realise we all spend money on the wrong gear from time to time.

  • Hi there! I recently just went through this dilemma so hopefully my 2 cents can help. I was using a D3100 since 2010 and was looking for an upgrade earlier this year. I was eyeing the Nikon Z6, I still have Nikon glass so i decided to stay in the system but wasn't sure if I should go full frame. Ultimately I decided on getting the Z50 as my glass were for crop sensors and the trade offs in the Z6 just wasn't worth it in my opinion (increased size and weight, expensive XQD cards etc.). Safe to say I have been very happy thus far but I am keen to see Nikon's next iteration which is coming soon so I think it's worth waiting it out to see if the new cameras (supposedly announcing this month) would suit you.